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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am redoing our basement...my wife's ex husband has the cat5 cable dropping out of the drop ceiling along the wall onto the floor.


I just set up a home theater system, ran my wires in the wall, attached the speakers on the wall...it looks clean, but this 1 wire, is falling out of the ceiling, just looks tacky.


While I was out, I looked at ethernet wall jacks, and noticed that, there isn't any wall jacks where the cable can just plug into...mount it, and plug in from the other side (like a satellite speaker wall plate would...banana plugs on both sides, and voila).


I know how to run the wire inside the wall, my question is...how do I attach the ethernet cable to the backside of the ethernet face plate, so I can have a small 3' section running to the computer, rather than having this ugly wire hanging from the ceiling down to the computer?


Everything I've read has me stripping the cat 5 cable, and attaching like colors to the plate...but I've also read that sometimes the colors on the plate don't match the colors in the ethernet cable.
 

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I would purchase the following:

Carlon Single Gang, Low Voltage, Old Work

Leviton QuickPort Category5e Jack


And one of the Leviton Single-Port Keystone wall-plates to fit the above Cat5e Keystone jack. I couldnt find the wall plate on the HomeDepot site, but it would look like:




As you said, some of the Keystone Jacks have varying color coding - this is for different cabling connections (ie. crossover). For a standard connection simply use the "B" color coding, which should follow the following:


PIN 1 Orange/White

PIN 2 Orange

PIN 3 Green/White

PIN 4 Blue

PIN 5 Blue/White

PIN 6 Green

PIN 7 Brown/White

PIN 8 Brown


NOTE: You should also be able to read this off of a pre-terminated cable that you probably already own.
 

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There are two wiring standards for CAT cable: 568A and 568B. See which standard the other end of the cable is using and connect this end the same. If you use the Leviton jacks which are readily available at the big box home improvement stores, the pins are color-coded with both standards, so it's really easy to hook up. You don't need to strip the individual wires. They are connected with insulation displacement connectors (IDC), so you place the wire in the slot and use the tool to push the wire into the connector. If the tool doesn't automatically trim the wire, you'll need to trim it by hand. I think the Leviton jacks include a small tool to use.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_5_cable

http://www.swhowto.com/CAT5_Ch2.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I picked up an RCA terminating wall plate...the guy at Lowes said attach color to color, tighten screw and voila...only problem is, the colors on the wires are different from the colors on the cat5 cable.


My cat5 has blue, white/blue, pink, white/pink, brown, white/brown and green, white/green. The wall plate has: dark blue, regular blue, red, green, yellow, white, brown, orange ...


attached the wires, plugged the other end into the router, and a network cable into the connection on the wall plate, only to no avail.


Starting to think I'm better off getting a tooless jack, and a wall plate with the opening for the jack rather than an all in 1 wall plate, with the jack already connected.


This is very similar to what I have.

http://www.ji.com.au/products/US4580/
 

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That's for phones that use RJ45. Do as suggested and get a wall plate and keystone jack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ok, I got the jack and the wall plate...levitron or something at home depot.


Now, how do I know if my Cat5 is type A or B? Also, with this jack, they gave me a little grey tool...do I need to strip the wires? Do they need to stay crossed?


Sorry for the questions, first time messing around with this type of project.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdiehm /forum/post/18189606


Ok, I got the jack and the wall plate...levitron or something at home depot.


Now, how do I know if my Cat5 is type A or B? Also, with this jack, they gave me a little grey tool...do I need to strip the wires? Do they need to stay crossed?


Sorry for the questions, first time messing around with this type of project.

As ESKAY said in his earlier post, "See which standard the other end of the cable is using and connect this end the same."


However, its MOST LIKELY going to be the "B" standard on both ends. Every pre-made CAT5e cable I have ever seen uses the B standard. That is essentially exactly what you are doing - you are just making an extension of that pre-made CAT5e cable.


As far as the grey tool.. you could read the instructions that came with the package
but they simply tell you to use the tool to press the UNSTRIPPED wire into each of the slots provided. There will likely be some excess wire hanging off the end of the connector, you can and should trim this as close to the connector as possible. This is to mainly to prevent any occurnace of the wires shorting each other, thus causing your cable not to work.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdiehm /forum/post/18189606


Now, how do I know if my Cat5 is type A or B? Also, with this jack, they gave me a little grey tool...do I need to strip the wires? Do they need to stay crossed?

Go to the wiki page I linked. See the two standards on the right hand side? You should be able to see through the RJ45 on the existing cable to see the wire colors. It's best to keep the wire pairs twisted as close to the actual IDC as possible.


Check this out:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sHy8mtW9eak


This is using an impact tool, but you'll be using the plastic tool included with the jack. Same purpose, but one takes more muscle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
All done...everything works.


Talked to a buddy and he said I could wire a type A wire using the type B diagram as long as I use a Type B cable from the jack to the computer.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdiehm /forum/post/18196707


All done...everything works.


Talked to a buddy and he said I could wire a type A wire using the type B diagram as long as I use a Type B cable from the jack to the computer.

There is no type A or B cable, only the way the wires are placed on the connector.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by duvetyne /forum/post/18197744


There is no type A or B cable, only the way the wires are placed on the connector.

So it really doesn't matter which connection diagram you use (A or B) onto the jack?


If someone wires a Type A Cat5 cable, with a Type B diagram (other end plugged into a router or whatever it may be)...would that matter?


Example:


568 A cable from router to new wall outlet. Wire that jack using the B diagram...and then use a B cable from that jack to a computer.


Would it make a difference? Not sure if I'm asking clearly or not. He's saying it doesn't matter because the wire from jack to computer has the right color pins as what the jack has (using the B diagram)...but does it matter if the other end of that source wire which is plugged into a router or internet source, has the connector wired in the A format?
 

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They way you are wording it makes it confusing for everyone... you said, "If someone wires a Type A Cat5 cable, with a Type B diagram"


As duvetyne stated, there is NO A or B "cable"... Cat5e cable is Cat5e cable. The way you wire it, using the A or B standard is what makes it a A/B cable.


Im assuming you could have a total of 6 connection terminations of some sort or another - 1 male that plugs into the router, one male that would plug into a wall jack nearby, the female wall jack itself, and the same on the other side that would plug into the laptop. As long as every end/connection point in your cable from router to laptop is wired exactly the same you will have a pass-through cable which is essentially what the majority of the pre-made cables are.... you just have a longer version with some portion of it in the wall.


One reason for the differences in the A/B standard are to make a cross-over cable. This type of cable utilizes one end that is connected using the A standard, and the other end with the B standard. What this does is connect the TRANSMIT pins of one network device with the RECEIVE pins of the other device. The reason for doing so is to connect 2 computers directly together w/o an intermediatary device such as a router or switch between the devices.


Technically speaking, in most cases (all that I know of) when you are connecting a laptop to a router it doesnt matter if you use a pass-through or crossover cable because the router is "smart enough" to determine the wiring and route the signals accordingly.
 

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As long as each segment is wired with the same standard, you'll be okay. Your whole house could be wired using 568A, but all of your patch cables are 568B. Doesn't matter. Pin-1 on one end is still wired to Pin-1 on the other end, Pin-2 to Pin-2, etc.
 
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