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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,


I am planning my home theatre room in my basement (currently unfinished). I want to put 8 posters (4 on each side), but I want to put them in RECESSED areas in the wall. I envision a recess of about 4 inches deep, and slightly larger than a standard poster in overall WxH dimensions. See attached image...


The drywall for these location backs to the foundation walls (concrete).


2 questions come to mind!


1) Can I get away with recessing these areas 4 inches or so, leaving the drywall in those areas basically touching the concrete wall? (the studs separate the drywall about 4 inches from the concrete). Is this even allowed by code?


2) Is it a code violation to separate the studs more than the standard 16" from each other in these locations? Otherwise I cannot open up a rectangle of ~27"x40".


Any other options? I know I can achieve this by separating the drywall further in to get more clearance, but I want to avoid losing the extra space.


Thanks in advance for any expert help!

 

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Cool design.


If you're recessing them, I assume the HT wall is at least a bit out from the (existing) wall behind it.


The more important "code" question becomes - have you fireblocked the top of the vertical 'space' between the two walls?


(Ask me how I know..first hand pain & suffering in a big way).


Of course, depends on how 'fussy' your city is. Having a non-fireblocked vertical gap IS against code (section 602.blah blah blah iirc), but most have this in their HT anyway for any decoupled wall built any distance away from an existing wall..


Hope this helps!


- B
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The drywall overall is separated from the basement wall by about 4 inches. Its what the studs separate them at...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gnolivos /forum/post/0


The drywall overall is separated from the basement wall by about 4 inches. Its what the studs separate them at...

Well, I'm only an amateur at "code", but what I understand is..


If you have a "normal" wall - ie: adjacent to the existing one, and there is no "gap" between it and the existing, then there is no need for vertical fire stop.


Of course, I could be completely and totally wrong, but I think you are OK.


- B
 

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Make the wall out of 2x6(or pull it a bit away from the concrete wall). Then frame a 'Window' with a proper 'header' and double the studs on each side (aka 'jackstuds') and then you can exceed the 16" on center concept. That 'window' could be done out of 2x4s (in the 2x6 wall) or 2x3s ( in a 2x4 wall)... and you can then insert a recessed panel of drywall within that 'window'.


And don't ignore the fireblocking concepts mentioned by others....
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks APJ.


See if I have the conept right in the attached pic.


If I understood this right, then with a 1/2" drywall, the back of the recessed area would be exactly 1 1/2" away from the concrete. Is it advisable to have drywall this close to the concrete wall? I really want to go with this idea, should look really nice, especially with halogen lighting from top!


Quote:
Originally Posted by APJ /forum/post/0


Make the wall out of 2x6(or pull it a bit away from the concrete wall). Then frame a 'Window' with a proper 'header' and double the studs on each side (aka 'jackstuds') and then you can exceed the 16" on center concept. That 'window' could be done out of 2x4s (in the 2x6 wall) or 2x3s ( in a 2x4 wall)... and you can then insert a recessed panel of drywall within that 'window'.


And don't ignore the fireblocking concepts mentioned by others....

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gnolivos /forum/post/0


Thanks APJ.


See if I have the conept right in the attached pic.


If I understood this right, then with a 1/2" drywall, the back of the recessed area would be exactly 1 1/2" away from the concrete. Is it advisable to have drywall this close to the concrete wall? I really want to go with this idea, should look really nice, especially with halogen lighting from top!

The 2x4s should be against the concrete wall and you drywall over them. that will only give you about a 2in recess.
 

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Hi, I am just wondering about the gap you are talking about. My entire basement (done when I moved in) has decoupled walls from the concrete. It is very common here in Edmonton from what I have seen. And there is nothing at the top of it. You can reach your hand down from above the tbar ceiling if you want to. This is a bad thing??
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So you see it differently than I do... I thought APJ meant as in my pic above...


A 2" recess is not going to be enough. APJ, can you chime in?!

Quote:
Originally Posted by w84no1 /forum/post/0


The 2x4s should be against the concrete wall and you drywall over them. that will only give you about a 2in recess.
 

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Here's how I'd fame it, as the wall is not load supporting.


The poster recess would have a backer board, oversized to cover the studs from behind. 2x4" framing, pulled out from the concrete. I'd use 3/4" ply or particle board and rout the edges so the edges that are on the stud are only 1/4" thick. I wouldn't secure the studs at the sides of the recess initially, but I would secure the recess' top and bottom plate to the side studs. Then I'd pull the assembly out and secure the backer board. The reinsert, and secure the side studs to the top and bottom plate. A piece of plywood temporaily secured over the front of the recess would keep the studs in postion and square, until the backer board is glued and nailed in place.


I would make sure that code allows you to have no insulation behind the recess. If such is the case, some foam insulation sheet could be glued behind the recess back. Don't use the blue foam as it needs a drywall covering over it. I *beleive* the white polystyrene board doesn't need a layer of drywall over it, but I would check this out for your locale.


The short studs inder the recess are located wherever the drywall edges end up. I'd try to keep 16" on center stud spacing on the lower wall. The drywall would go in panels, 4' wide. Then the recess openings would be cut out.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeoOiler /forum/post/0


Hi, I am just wondering about the gap you are talking about. My entire basement (done when I moved in) has decoupled walls from the concrete. It is very common here in Edmonton from what I have seen. And there is nothing at the top of it. You can reach your hand down from above the tbar ceiling if you want to. This is a bad thing??

If you can reach over the top of the tbar ceiling BEHIND the finished wall (ie. between the wall and the concrete outer wall), then as far as I know it's a bad thing. That space between the studs and the concrete wall makes a PERFECT chimney, and if there's ever an electrical short in one of your outlets (or a cord connected to the outlet) the resulting fire will funnel up the back of the wall, into the joist cavity above and from there to the next floor up. My understanding is that's what fireblock is for - to forestall the fire from getting to the next floor.


Around here code requires a 3/4" plywood plate over the top plate of your wall reaching out to the sill on the outside of the foundation wall. I can't speak for Edmonton because I haven't lived there since December '95, and even then I hadn't done enough construction to know the difference.



-drin
 

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Tedd had my proposal described the way I intended. Kind of an oversize opening... for a future 'window' frame that you could measure, create a snug fit, provide baking/insulation - keeping it off of the concrete wall - AND THEN slide it into the 2x6 wall studs to secure it 'from in the room'. Keep the 2x4 and 2x6 flush to the inside of the room and then you've got a cavity/window that 3-1/2" deep into the wall (and you can adjust that up or down by ripping the 2x4's or adding strips of 1/2" ply/MDF, etc)


Fire blocking - some locations permit fiberglass insulation at the top of the transition from wall to ceiling (to preventing airflow/drafting/chimney flame propogation). Dont' skim p and I'm really no expert here....


Finally, if your thinking about 'halogen' - embeded in that 'poster window' - be careful with the heat, & consider those that are appropriately dimmable.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by drin /forum/post/0


Around here code requires a 3/4" plywood plate over the top plate of your wall reaching out to the sill on the outside of the foundation wall. I can't speak for Edmonton because I haven't lived there since December '95, and even then I hadn't done enough construction to know the difference.



-drin

Here they were fine with a strip of drywall fastened to the ceiling joists. The secret is to put the strips up before framing the walls. Snug to the sill and extended out to the inner edge of where the top plate will sit. Along two walls you will have to put in cross blocking between the 2 joists to attach the drywall strips and the wall framing.
 

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Maybe it will look like this guy's?








I love this look.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yes, that's the idea. I think it gives it a great look.
 
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