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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am installing an HT system and using in-wall speakers. The in-wall subwoofer will be installed in the sheetrock under a built-in cabinet housing the receiver/cable box, etc. The subwoofer space is an unfinished stud wall cavity 27" W X 22" H X 32"D. There is sheet rock on the outsides of the subwoofer cavity walls. The floor is concrete under the speaker.


1) Should I partition or baffle this space to make it smaller or is bigger better for the bass sound? I plan on a 10" sub. 2) Should I put some fiberglass insulation around the inside of the cavity?


I'm new at this so any suggestions would be appreciated.

 

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What about putting a regular sub in the wall like that? I have a closet that I would like to place them in, firing out into the room. Is that possible?
 

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Use an in-wall sub that has an optional enclosure that mounts to the studs. If the wall is still open it's the only way to go.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by topr /forum/post/18194584


Use an in-wall sub that has an optional enclosure that mounts to the studs. If the wall is still open it's the only way to go.

It's the only way to go, period.


peleliu, what model sub are you using? If it does not have an separate enclosure that mounts to the studs, you'll get all kinds of vibration plus sound will bleed all over the place. You can't just cut a woofer into a wall and have it work well, sheetrock is NOT a good cabinet material, plus speaker enclosures (especially subwoofers) need to be sealed very tight.


Sounds like the sub maybe doesn't have enough volume behind it, if the vertical is cut off by a built-in for the electronics. Or is this deeper than just 3.5" stud depth? We need more info to better help you.


Pictures?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by head_unit /forum/post/18194996


Sounds like the sub maybe doesn't have enough volume behind it, if the vertical is cut off by a built-in for the electronics. Or is this deeper than just 3.5" stud depth? We need more info to better help you.

Pictures?

The space for the subwoofer is large. I'm thinking it is too large. See my original post for dimensions of space. See picture below. There will be a built-in cabinet above the subwoofer. The bottom of the cabinet will be about 22" from the floor. This will leave the space below it for the subwoofer.


I haven't picked out the subwoofer yet. I am looking for an inexpensive one that I can power with a separate amp. I'm not an audiophile so I will compromise on sound for an in-wall installation. Any recommendations?


 

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One way to save a few bucks is forgo the expensive sub woofer amp and power it with a pro audio amp and let your receiver's eq take care of the anomalies the room and placement may introduce. It's not the optimum way but plenty good enough for most folks. As far as a sub there are quite a few...what's your budget for a whole setup, amp, enclosure (backbox), and sub.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by topr /forum/post/18196295


One way to save a few bucks is forgo the expensive sub woofer amp and power it with a pro audio amp and let your receiver's eq take care of the anomalies the room and placement may introduce. It's not the optimum way but plenty good enough for most folks. As far as a sub there are quite a few...what's your budget for a whole setup, amp, enclosure (backbox), and sub.

My budget is around $350. Are there any complete setups in this range? What do you recommend? What are some of the pro audio amps you would recommend? I don't know what using these involves?

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by peleliu /forum/post/18194204


I am installing an HT system and using in-wall speakers. The in-wall subwoofer will be installed in the sheetrock under a built-in cabinet housing the receiver/cable box, etc. The subwoofer space is an unfinished stud wall cavity 27" W X 22" H X 32"D. There is sheet rock on the outsides of the subwoofer cavity walls. The floor is concrete under the speaker.


1) Should I partition or baffle this space to make it smaller or is bigger better for the bass sound? I plan on a 10" sub. 2) Should I put some fiberglass insulation around the inside of the cavity?


I'm new at this so any suggestions would be appreciated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by peleliu /forum/post/18196742


My budget is around $350. Are there any complete setups in this range? What do you recommend? What are some of the pro audio amps you would recommend? I don't know what using these involves?


Don't even consider installing a raw driver in a sheetrock enclosure. You won't have "compromised" sound. You'll have very BAD sound. I would not even use a sub rather than trying to force a bass driver into a sheetrock enclosure. This article will explain why:
http://www.cepro.com/article/how_to_...er_systems/D1/

You either need to enclose it or set it up as an infinite baffle, (IB).


If you want to enclose it, you need a driver designed for a sealed enclosure. The enclosure itself needs to be designed to the specific dimensions required for best response from the driver. It needs to be made from relatively inert material, (1" MDF works well), and it needs to be braced and sealed. Also, a sealed enclosure needs a stronger amplifier, and may need some EQ to boost the lowest notes in order to get flat, useful response.


If you want to build an infinite baffle, you need a driver designed for that application. Then the baffle needs to be designed to seal the back wave from the front wave.


If you want to build either of these types of systems, I suggest you head over to the DIY forum and ask for some design guidance there:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forum...prune=30&f=155


Also, if you're interested in an IB sub, you can check out this link:
http://ibsubwoofers.proboards.com/index.cgi


Otherwise, I predict you will be extremely dissatisfied with your efforts installing a driver in a sheetrock enclosure.


Good luck.


Craig


PS. Another suggestion is to used a purpose-built in-wall sub with an integral enclosure. They are generally priced above your budget, but they will provide much better bass response and reduced sound transmission. Here are a few examples:
http://www.velodyne.com/products/pro...9&sid=498w738w
http://www.earthquakesound.com/thor10_inwall.htm
http://www.atlantictechnology.com/default.asp?NodeId=55
 

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I would just buy a regular sealed or ported sub sized within the specs/space you have in the built in cabinet Have the trim carpenter/cabinet person build a door frame with center wood panel removed. Instead of a center wood panal on the door use grill cloth or other acoustically transparent cloth.


If the sub ever needs to be removed you just pull it out for repair or replacement.


I have a similar situation in which I have dual subs, one "hiding" in a coat closet and on in my AV/media rack room. Both subs front fire right into my living room/theater.. I used speaker grills for the in-wall sub look.


Here are some pictures of my setup (scroll down thread for pictures) http://forum.edesignaudio.com/showth...650-72511.html You may even look at some of elemntal designs subs for your application. I ended up going with one of their DIY 650kits. If all goes well with one I will buy and build another. I think they could also handle you issue of the sub being powered separatly. They do quite a bit of custom type stuff or you may jsut think about A3-300 which would fit in yoru space.


I have such a large space to fill I am going with something with more punch to it the the M&K subs I have now.


Either of our situations are less than pefect but its what I have to deal with.


Hope this helps

John
 

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MrMeaner's suggestion is a good one... with a few caveats...


First, ensure that any sub you consider using in this type of application, (in an enclosed space, behind a cloth paneled door), has it's driver mounted on the front face of it's enclosure. Also, any ports, slots or passive radiators should be on the same face as the driver, and all drivers/ports should be faced towards the cloth covered opening.


Second, stuff insulation around and behind the sub to fill the unoccupied space in the enclosed opening. This will help isolate the sub from the rest of the entertainment center, and it will reduce vibrations in the enclosed space. However, ensure enough air flow behind the sub amp to allow for cooling of the amp.


Third, place the sub on an isolation pad, (SubeDude or similar), to reduce the sub's coupling to the bottom of the ET center.


Fourth, place the sub as close to the opening as possible, so you don't get any "horn" effects or diffraction from the edges of the enclosed space.


This placement of a sub is not ideal, but the above suggestions will minimize the potential "issues". You may still have boomy, muddy bass, but that may be due more to the suboptimal placement of the sub within the room, than it's placement within the ET center.


Craig
 
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