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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have bought and tested at least 5 various indoor antennas to receive HD signals from approximately 18 miles away. I'm in the PHL area, but live over in NJ. The towers that broadcast the signal are at approx. 313 degrees from my location up in Roxborough, PA.


But due to my lower level apartment, I am unable to even put an antenna outside so I've tried all of the Radio shack antennas. The only one of those that worked half way decent was a $30 ampllified unit. But then I bought the RCA model from Best Buy that has a built in 45db amplifier. This one gives me 60% signals for all the networks. Sometimes it dips lower, depending on weather.

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage....=1122653825071


Here's my question -
Should the actual loop on the indoor antenna be aimed broadside in the direction of the towers, or should the loop be turned so that its edge is facing the towers? I've tried different aiming techniques and I think I have the best I can get, but this sometimes compromises signal quality on one channel vs. another (even though they are both broadcast from the same tower cluster!). KYW Philly comes in pretty strong all the time, while WPVI is often the weakest. WCAU and WTXF are usually ok, too, but not as strong as KYW.
 

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My signal strength is probably up to 1/1000th of your signal strength (since my HD stations are under transitional rules) and i also live in a ground floor suite and pickup signals from an indoor antenna about 10km away.

Since you are most likely picking up a reflected signal you may end up not necessarily pointing your antenna out the window or at the source and may get the signal bouncing off your interior walls. If you have metal blinds you will get better reception with them raised to allow more of the signal indoors.

I have tested various antennas and found the two, made in the USA, antennas from Winegard - the SS-3000 and the SS-2000 work real good. The larger area of the antenna picks up more of the reflected signal and you will have less dropped signals vs. the smaller loop antennas.

I also tested the small RCA & Phillip amplified antennas and found they dropped the signal often.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PHL /forum/post/12949252


Here's my question -
Should the actual loop on the indoor antenna be aimed broadside in the direction of the towers, or should the loop be turned so that its edge is facing the towers? I've tried different aiming techniques and I think I have the best I can get, but this sometimes compromises signal quality on one channel vs. another (even though they are both broadcast from the same tower cluster!).

The open face of the loop should be facing in the directions of the broadcast towers. Exactly which model indoor antennas have you tried besides the RCA ANT525? Did you try different locations such as placing the antenna in the window or high up in the room? You may need to step up to 2 bay bowtie that you can place in the window or facing towards the broadcast towers such as a Channel Master 4220 or AntennasDirect DB-2. However, you would need to add a VHF antenna with this because in February, 2009, WPVI-DT ABC 6 will switch it's digital channel to VHF 6.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies. In reality, having my loop facing the rough heading of 313 degrees gets the best reception for all the channels, even though WPVI is the weakest. I hadn't considered the bouncing of signals in the apartment. My distribution panel/closet is not near a window, though, so the antenna is basically inside the middle of the apartment with numerous walls and obstructions between it and the outside. I guess I'm just lucky to even be getting a signal at all. My windows all face East anyway, so I don't know that I'd get a better signal moving it closer to one of them.


The other ones I tried were every indoor model that Radio shack sells, including the one with the built in rotor that moves it for you with a little remote. That one was actually the biggest disappointment.
 

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Might have better luck with an ATSC tuner, using one of the newer chips, that work best with weak signals in multipath areas. Some tuners (see home PC forum) work with PCs; others have threads here. There's a chance your set already has one of these improved 5th/6th-generation chips. My Silver Sensor antenna, in heavily multipathed mid-town NYC, worked sometimes by pointing it at multipath reflections >90 degrees from broadcast sites. -- John
 
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