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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted this in the HTPC area also, but maybe it's better here. I guess the subject says it all, or most of it at least. I am going to "TRY" an indoor attic antenna for my HD via HiPix and need to know if and how to ground it. I realize that if I run it outdoors that a ground is needed, but what about an inside installation?? It will be mounted in my attic and the coax will run outside the house, down the siding, into the basement via a low cut hole in the side of the house (boy is my wife going to love this!!). Should I run some sort of metal along side the coax and split it when the coax enters the basement running the metal "rod" down in the ground?? That's my only thought on this.... Any help????



Thanks in advance,

Michael




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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Is there any danger of the obvious?? Lightning?? Remember, I'm going to have to run the coax down the "outside" of the house from the attic down two floors to the basement. Does that play in the cards here?


Michael


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No, the coax is shielded in rubber. As long as no metal appears outside your home, it is safe to just run the wire,


Lee
 

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Although I agree there is no need to ground this antenna, I must point out that voltages so high they can jump through several miles of air are not going to be dissuaded by a few mm of rubber.



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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I do have a Pnanmax coax surge protector. I'll hook it up through it. That should at least protect my equipment, right????



Mike


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I thought the purpose for grounding was NOT protection from lightning but to drain stray voltages that can accumulate on the antenna and to protect your equipment from these stray voltages?


Am I wrong?


Rick
 

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If you get a direct hit by lightning, the surge protector and your equipment will be vaporized (or at least be converted into a smoking pile of junk).


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Correct.


As I indicated, nothing (reasonable) can protect from a direct lightning strike. But grounding can prevent the build-up and consequent arching over of static charges as might occur with an outside antenna. I don't think static charges are a problem with indoor antennas regardless of how the wiring is routed. This is just my gut feeling.


Outdoor antennas should be grounded not only for the static charge issue but also in case of a direct hit. Although your equipment will be fried regardless, if the antenna was not properly grounded, a strike would cause much more extensive damage and injury.



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