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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In preperation for the installaton of my TWC HDTV box tonight I went out to buy some interconnect cables. I was shocked to find quality component cables going for $50 and up (retail R.S. and C.C.). When I looked at cables that were labled shielded component cables and cables that were labled shielded video/audio cables I could not tell any difference except that the componet cables had little plastic rings colored red, blue and green. Both sets were coax with RCA connectors. I bought one $50 cable labled shielded component video (3 attached cables) and one $19 cable labled shielded video with right and left stereo (again 3 attached cables). When I got home I hooked them up one at a time to my DVD player's component output and then input to the the component connection on my Toshiba 65H81. Ladies and gentlemen I nor the 5 people I surveyed could tell a difference in the cables. Yet, there is a $30 difference in the cables retail price. I think these cables are the very same they are only labled/marketed differently. I would hope to an oscilliscope they are different, but to the human eye they are not. I would also hope if you had a long run to make the more expesive cable would be worth it, but I doubt it.

I think there is an industry consipiracy here to sell expensive cables to the people who don't know any better. Of course the sales people at both stores said the audio/video cable would not work on a component video connection. They were either flat out wrong, or flat out lying. My .02 cents
 

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Usually with Video/2 audio cables

The audio leads are not shielded


Component cables are all shielded


For short runs just about any cable WILL work

You could probably use WET CLOTHESLINE and some signal would get to your set.


But it does not mean that its right


The high freq. croma components will go away and get noisy.



Also.....

Settle down

Relax......

There is no conspiracy

Only high priced cables



If you want the best bang for your buck

Make your own

Go to home depot and get some rg6 and "F" connectors

Make yourself some cables

Go to radioshack and get some "F" to "rca" adaptors.

Plug in your cables

and enjoy
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm relaxed as well as calm. The conspiracy comment was said tongue in cheek. I simply wanted to make people aware that for short runs of 20 feet or less you don't need to purchase the expensive stuff. And you can talk about shielding and noise all day long, but it really comes down to what it looks like for the money. If uninformed people are being told you have to have component cables for a component connection that is what they'll buy. The truth is there is a lot more available for cheaper. Even as you said making it your self.
 

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I have always bought the least expensive cables at Target (mostly GE) and Radio Shack. I have never had a problem, nor have I heard or seen a difference. The only expensive wiring I have purchased was for my bipolar Paradigms... the cables were included when I purchased the speakers and made it infinitely easier for hookups. They even added the banana plugs for me....

It is crazy to pay more than $50 for cables when you cannot see or hear the difference. Of course people go out and spend $10,000 on tube amps... go figure.
 

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I tried this little experiment myself when I received my Dish6000. When all was initially hooked up I had a set of cables with the 1video/2audio setup leftover. When I got my DVD player I used the component cable that came with it. Although, they are a little short for my setup. I have just procrastinated on getting a longer set. So I had this extra set that was longer than the component cable for my DVD and I went ahead and replaced it. I put in Gladiator to see if everything was OK. Well, I watched the beginning of the movie with the fire and blood blue in color. It was quit strange. I don't know if my cable run to close to some power leads, but it looks like I definitely need a set of good shielded component cables. I friend told me to go to Meijers and buy some Acoustic Research for $20-30.


Jeff
 

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It just goes to show, marketing is everything.


There is actually one company for which it's entire existance is based solely on marketing hype when it comes to cables (Monster Cables).


Now I'm not saying they don't have the best cables. They probably do (I've seen their construction, they certainly do put into the product the the extra money you shell out). The only thing is, it is ususally not needed in most intances.


Those people who claim they can see a difference are those who claim to have higher than "norm" esoteric quality of senses that allows only themselves to see the difference. Whatever. If they want to spend extra money for over-hyped cables, go for it.


I have found that most cables from just about anywhere are adequet. But on the other hand I HAVE seen some really bad cables from the likes of Wal-Mart and Target. There IS the other end of the spectrum too.


Rick
 

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Quote:
If you want the best bang for your buck

Make your own

Go to home depot and get some rg6 and "F" connectors

Make yourself some cables

Go to radioshack and get some "F" to "rca" adaptors.

Plug in your cables

and enjoy
This is what I did and to my suprise I was able to tell the difference, things look sharper now...


I bought the DST 3000 receiver and used the component cables that came with the unit. Now this cables are not bad, they work and I didn't see any problems at all. as a matter of fact, I was amazed at the PQ of HD net. then I decided to build my own cables using RG6, just like woowoo is saying above and I still can't beleive that my PQ is better and sharper, needless to say I am very happy.
 

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HD component and high resolution RGB do require good cables. The bandwidth and the impedance of the cable must match the application. The shielded CAT5 RGB cable thread in the digital projector forum has a lot of good info on this subject.
 

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About a year ago I purchased a printer for my computer. After rebates the printer cost $49 at CC. Then I went over to the cable dept and saw the 1284 printer cable for $29. I choked and bought just the printer. Then I went to the local electronics store and purchased a 1284 cable for $4. Never have had a printer problem.


The printer prices are highly competetive so they make their money in cables. People tend to shop around for any electronics product and then just buy the cables required.


No doubt the $80 component cables are well made. Hovever, I bought the $19.99 12' double shielded gold plated GE component cable from Target.


Rick R
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by JoeFloyd
HD component and high resolution RGB do require good cables. The bandwidth and the impedance of the cable must match the application. The shielded CAT5 RGB cable thread in the digital projector forum has a lot of good info on this subject.
You are contradicting yourself here. Yes, a good impedance match is essential for HDTV analog video. But CAT5 cable is 110ohms balanced. How does that work with a 75ohm video system?


I read alot in these forums about CAT5 cable baing mis-used. Just because it's rated at 100 of even 350mhz for Ethernet data doesn't mean it's automatically a superior cable for any application. Cables are transmission lines, even the cord on your table lamp is a transmission line. Of course at 60hz and for the purpose of heating the bulb filament, it doesn't really matter.


It's all in the application.
 

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CAT5 for RBG Signals???


Now I have heard of everything. I thought CAT5 only had two sets of twisted pair (UNSHIELDED!!!) wires and is designed to handle balanced (out-of-phase) signals.


Now how does one get 3 75ohm unbalanced (single-ended) video signals down an ethernet CAT5 cable? Are people really doing this? If so, that is a good laugh!!! I would be amazed if this works at all.


Wow.


Rick
 

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OK I looked at the threads. My mistake. CAT5 has 4 twisted pair and CAT5E IS a shielded CAT5 cable. IT's been a while since I messed around with ethernet.


I guess it goes to show. If you fool around with something long enough you can make it work. Whether it is ideal or not, that is another question.


As in all situations, it is up to the user to decide if it is for him or not.


Rick
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by wirehead_rick
CAT5 for RBG Signals???


Now I have heard of everything. I thought CAT5 only had two sets of twisted pair (UNSHIELDED!!!) wires and is designed to handle balanced (out-of-phase) signals.


Now how does one get 3 75ohm unbalanced (single-ended) video signals down an ethernet CAT5 cable? Are people really doing this? If so, that is a good laugh!!! I would be amazed if this works at all.


Wow.


Rick
Cat5 cable, as it is intended for Networking Uses is 4 pair (8 wires). You can buy Cat5 in sheilded or unsheilded configurations, however it provides ONE SHIELDING for all pairs not pairs individually. If it takes two wires to make one cable you should be able to make AT LEAST 4 with one RUN/PIECE of Cat5 (even more if the cable share a common ground).

Quote:
I thought CAT5 only had two sets of twisted pair (UNSHIELDED!!!)
My father always told me, "that's what you get for thinking". In other words pick your words carefully if you THINK something as opposed to KNOWING something.
 

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Is 6M long enough? And only $69.95. Check this site out, they have lots of stuff for audio/video distribution.
 

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The one thing I'll give monster credit for, is their connectors. I absolutely love the connectors on their higher up component cables. Now I'll admit, at a certain point, you cant tell a difference. Plus I got a good deal on these. Anyway, the difference in connectors is, they're rubber coated (not metal sand paper like, believe it or not, another set of cables I had), and it has vertical slits in it so the plug scales open then then grabs onto the jack. This beats having to muscle a fixed size plug onto a jack. If the jack isn't really sturdy, and you're shoving this tight fitting plug onto it, and you break the jack (from pushing it in too far), this could be bad...


Another thing I like from them that I haven't seen anywhere else, is their S-Video or Component cables for PS2. I have the S-Video set and they're really nice quality.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by tivolovit
........My father always told me, "that's what you get for thinking". In other words pick your words carefully if you THINK something as opposed to KNOWING something.
Maybe you should read the entire thread before you think you KNOW what was written :rolleyes:


Rick
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by tivolovit




Cat5 cable, as it is intended for Networking Uses is 4 pair (8 wires). You can buy Cat5 in sheilded or unsheilded configurations, however it provides ONE SHIELDING for all pairs not pairs individually. If it takes two wires to make one cable you should be able to make AT LEAST 4 with one RUN/PIECE of Cat5 (even more if the cable share a common ground).



My father always told me, "that's what you get for thinking". In other words pick your words carefully if you THINK something as opposed to KNOWING something.

It has nothing to do with shielding. CAT5 cable is not intended for 75ohm video signals. It's the wrong impedance and wrong type of construction, twisted pair versus coaxial.


Now they do make adapters that convert video and audio to CAT5 and these are OK as they match the impedance and use a differential driver. But even these boxes are not for high quality video. They are intended for putting up security cameras in buildings where there is lot's of CAT5 but no easy accees to run coax.
 

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It's important to remember that a coat hanger will work to get the signal from your STB to your set (at least work as far as seeing an image) so long as you don't touch one of them to another (direct short!).


When referring to audio frequencies, it's highly debateable from the engineering point of view whether line transmission theory is applicable. (Transmission theory goes beyond simple circuit behavior to such things as "skin effect", damping loss, etc...). However, video frequency information is a little different. You can indeed lose information in the upper freequency range using cables with inadequate dielectric and/or mis-matched impedance.


Should such cables cost lots of $$$? Probably not. Most RG-6 75 Ohm cable is entirely suitable for use in video applications, and it's very cheap - you can make a set for about $6 in parts, and it will perform just as well as a $250 Monster cable as far as an oscilloscope is concerned.


Higher-priced cables, IMO, are a combination of "little niceties" such as Monster's proprietary grip-type RCA connections, and marketing drivel. From an engineer's point of view, there's little reason to purchase a single-strand silver cable with liquid dielectric and platinum connectors, but cable companies have proven time and again that there is a market for such things....
 
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