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I currently own a RCA F38310 and was wondering if there were a cheap way to switch component video, since this set has only one input for component......


Secondly,


If Directv and Dish merge, my satelite receiver and HDTV decoder is built in? Will this mean that will render my existing equipment obsolete?


Lastly,


If I had a normal sat receiver that had component output... could I feed that through the set and decode the HDTV? or does the receiver(external satelite) have to do that?


Thanks.
 

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On your first question, there are indeed component switching boxes out there, though I think the best route to take is to get an audio processor/receiver with high-bandwidth component switching (at least 35 MHz is what I have found reference to). Now, you can actually ignore the bandwidth requirement if the only sources you're switching are outputting a maximum of 480p (DVD, most next-gen video games, etc.), but if you have sources where you are going to want 540p, 720p, 1080i or 1080p then it's pretty important to verify the bandwidth. If the store or manufacturer won't tell you the bandwidth, then assume the "worst." As I said, I prefer the receiver/prepro solution myself because it has the added benefit of handling the source selection for both your video and your audio; there are several models out there with 35+ MHz bandwidth in a relatively affordable (about $350 and up) price range and the good ones usually have 3 in/1 out component and even more inputs for S-Video/composite. The only disadvantage that I can tell to the prepro/receiver route is that only a very few will "upconvert" the signals from composite->S-Video->component so you would still need to switch inputs on the television for these three types of source (not that big of a disadvantage in my mind).


On the second question, there hasn't been any real official word but I would bet the farm that your DirecTV HD receivers (be they integrated or outboard) are going to continue working until or unless they change the actual delivery technology for satellite HD (regular channels should continue to work fine, regardless); the receiver will continue to work for OTA in any case. This is the only real disadvantage to the integrated TV/receiver solution.


On your last question, it's just a simple no. Signals fed into the component output are not run through the TV's internal HDTV decoding hardware. Therefore, if you have another HD source (like DishNetwork, for example), you would have to have the full Dish HD setup outboard of the television; this would decode the HDTV signals and send them via component output to your TV. :)


Aaron
 

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Why be cheap on a component switcher and loose the picture you would gain by using a pass thru device. I paid total of $685 for a InlineInc IN3504 military grade pass thru switcher for 4 to 1 component input.



When I hooked up our sponsers silver serpent cables both of my Sony DVD mega changers I haven't lost any whatsoever video loss of any or all 2 of the 3 phono input connection. If I want 4 Sony or any brand mega changers, I can hook them up and still not have *any* degradation of video signal. my 2¢.:)
 

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Why be cheap on a switcher? Well, probably because in some households spending $685 on a component switcher can cause one to lose access to the credit cards and checkbook. :D


-Aaron
 

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So can $3000 plus receivers that only have 2 or 3 component out, it's too bad you can't afford quality equipment like this cripple can. You can go where you please and shop where you want, for you have a car, but I don't.


I don't have to pay monthly car payments full coverage insurance and the fees plus maintainance that goes with it besides gasoline every week. That is one of the reasons I can afford PQ pass thru equipment.
 

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I catch your drift, though it should be noted that receivers with two or three component inputs (can't see why most people would want two or three outs) can be had at much more reasonable prices than you describe, in the $300-400 range. For example, the JVC RX-8020VBK is a receiver with DD-EX, DTS-ES and DPL(II) processing that has 2-in/1-out component switching (this should be enough for most applications when you have a TV with a built-in HDTV decoder) at 35 MHz bandwidth for $400, which could probably be found for a bit less since that price is from a non-discount place. In my mind, that ain't too shabby at all, and it's the first one I found after five minutes of looking.


I would further submit that when you are looking at a relatively small screen (less than 40 inches), the quality benefit you are going to derive from using the higher-end equipment may not be significant enough to justify spending a lot more money. Of course, this is going to vary according to how close you sit to the television, exactly which television it is, etc.


Then again, I can be something of a penny-pincher on some things while at the same time being extravagant in others. For me, this would be a place to pinch a few (i.e. I'm going on Tuesday to pick up a GameCube and a few games despite already having a PS2 with many that I don't have enough time to play; I can spend with the best of them). :D


-Aaron
 

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FWIW,


Denon did a test on their first generation component switching receivers that were speced 27MHz bandwidth. The resolution loss was VERY difficult to see on a high quality display (I think they ran 720p to a Princenton Graphics monitor). I believe it was Denon Dave who reported the test on the forum. Those component connectors weren't actually labeled HD-ready but they still did HD very well.


I think good switching is great but there are definite limitations to what a direct view display can actually resolve (lucky if you get 1000 horizontal pixels). I think 99% of the receivers with component switching will work fine.


I definitely wouldn't pay close to $700 for a seperate switcher


-Mr. Wigggles
 

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I certainly wouldn't doubt it, Wiggles. I'm not nearly educated enough on the details of component wires, resistances, tolerances, etc. to offer a truly educated decision. My only education comes from research on the web. Personally, I would probably take the chance (assuming the sound quality was acceptable) with a less-expensive receiver and just return it if the video switching didn't satisfy me; of course, I don't buy much electronics over the web since I'm one of those look-the-home-theater-guy-in-the-eye types. :)


-Aaron


PS-

It's worth noting that even composite/S-Video switching can be bad on a receiver where there isn't a bandwidth concern, just because of poor isolation/separation/shielding of the pass-through. Since receivers don't often get reviewed (with serious measurements) on the basis of their switching of high-end video signals (this is usually considered a "bonus" feature with sound being [rightly] the focus), I think it's one of those YMMV situations.
 

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Although the two of you say your *not* educated in electronics, but I as the son of college educated electrician am, I do know about what a pass thru switcher needs to be. I would gladly pay $685 again. You said what would need that many for?



I have 2 Sony DVD mega changers, 1 DVD RCA RC6000P Progressive Scan single, thats 3

and in August I am selling my CX-850 200 to buy 2 of the new CX-875 300 + 1 Mega Changers that are Progressive Scan while keeping the CX-860 filled 300 DVP.



I am now using 3 out of 4, when WebTV finally bites the dust I will buy a computer and and component adapter for a HTPC that makes 4. You were saying why spend $685 for a switcher, first of all it weighs 4 pounds. Military grade computer switcher I converted it by using bnc to phono jacks, some of the devices are probably being used in Afghanistan.



The U.S. Military paid InlineInc to make their battle worthy computer switcher to be used in all types of weather it has dual voltages of 110 or 220, and doesn't degrade the signal. I knew what had to be in it for it to pass the signals thru without any video signal degredation.



I might be crippled in the legs but my edjucated by my father, I actually took over duties when he got older. I also took courses in electronics at our Vo-Tech school in Forks Township. If you know what the device has to have and your not in a position to build it yourself you buy it. This piece of military grade hardware is just the ticket to allow 4 devices used with component out to be connected with the Silver Serpents.



I have connected to one hell of a beautiful picture on a now 1 year old HDTV F-38310 and 1 year old IN3504 miltary grade converted component switching. You say $685 is too much, but their are high end cables that go for about $500 a meter (3 feet). I know the pure silver plated over High Oxygen Free Copper cables with good shielding do the trick at $99 a meter. You get what you pay for if you have the knowledge of what your buying will be he best for what your needs are.:)
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by MrWigggles
FWIW,


Denon did a test on their first generation component switching receivers that were speced 27MHz bandwidth. The resolution loss was VERY difficult to see on a high quality display (I think they ran 720p to a Princenton Graphics monitor). I believe it was Denon Dave who reported the test on the forum. Those component connectors weren't actually labeled HD-ready but they still did HD very well.


I think good switching is great but there are definite limitations to what a direct view display can actually resolve (lucky if you get 1000 horizontal pixels). I think 99% of the receivers with component switching will work fine.


I definitely wouldn't pay close to $700 for a seperate switcher


-Mr. Wigggles
Hi Mr Wiggles, my pre list the following specs for component switching but I opted not to use it and bought the extra cables yesterday. Ill have HD directv on Monday and will be passing 1080i and didn’t want to play games. I had loss of quality in older receivers passing svideo so I had a bad taste about video switching in general, maybe I should have tried it first? My Tv has two component inputs so if I get another component source ill be forced to use it anyway.


Component Green-110 MHz -3 dB

Component Red-90 MHz -3 dB

Component Blue-80 MHz -3 dB


regards

Shaun
 

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hob,


Its your money.


I don't know how silver serpents outperform good and much cheaper Belden but I'm sure you are just about to tell me.


Shaun,


110 MHz is plenty for a -3dB rating.


The only test pattern you'll be able to get for yourself will be through a test DVD such as AVIA played with a progressive DVD player. Look for any signal degredation between going the direct route versus going through the receiver's switcher. The 200 TVL pattern is a good one to use.


Bare in mind that a direct views screen resolution is essentially about 960X540 when showing 1080i sources. That resolution is not much higher than progressive scan DVD so the 480p test should be a reasonable test.


For s-video switching, the only degredation that i've seen is when using the s-video output of the receiver that has On-Screen-Display of the receiver imbedded. Typically the straight switched output is cleaner.


-Mr. Wigggles
 

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For $685.00 I'd rather pay someone to pull out one set of plugs and put in another each time I want to change inputs. Geez ... the whole reason I need a switcher is for the Xbox ($200) my DVD player ($200) and my set top box ($450) ... or about the cost of an expensive switcher.
 

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I'm pretty new to all of this, and I'm bringing this info from a gaming forum, but appraently, JVC makes a prety cheap component switcher (~$75). It's called the JVC JX-S111, I looked for it, found it on etronics.com for 74.99. Probably not for those who want perfect pass through, but if you're just looking for something to switch the component, and are only dealing with 480p, it might work fine. I'm thinkging about getting one to switch between my Xbox, PS2, and gamecube, since my receiver only has two component ins, and my DVD player needs one of them.


Anyway, just thought I'd point out that someone does make a cheap one. Good luck.
 

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I am seriously looking into this JVC switcher. Any stories on how this thing performs. I am a little frightened by its low cost. My HD sources is going to have a dedicated input but I will have to switch between my HTPC and DVD player.
 

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You don't have to spend $685 for decent video switching.


Check out THIS THREAD for info.


The manual JVC JX-S111 can be found at etronics for $75. I have a high definition digital cable box (1080i), a progressive scan DVD player (480p), and an interlaced DVD player (480i) running through my JX-S111, and I see no signal degradation. 720p sources may show some losses through it. Do a search on this forum for more info on the JX-S111, it has been heavily reviewed.


People have also been successful using standard composite audio/video switches -- they claim that they don't see any effects.


The Inday RGB4X referenced in the referenced thread above looks interesting at $180 -- but you may need to get a second switch for digital audio. The JX-S111 can be used to switch coaxial digital audio.




Joe
 
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