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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,


I tried searching the forums because I swore I saw this topic before I registered, and now I cannot find it.


Anyways, I just bought a new house and didn't have a lot of time to plan anything so I did 2 runs of Cat 5e into each room coming from a central point in the basement.


I want to know if I can redirect IR signals over the ethernet?


What I want to accomplish, for example, is to have ceiling speakers in the living room, and the A/V reciever in the basement. I have my remote, I point it at an IR input device that is hooked up to one of the Cat5e cables and then outputs into the basement pointing at my reciever. So I can control the system from where ever I have the IR input device.


Hopefully this makes sense, I am still learning, the forums are awesome, I just wish I could find this old post...


If someone could help me out I would appreciate it.


Thanks!
 

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I'm running IR over cat 5 from Russound inwall volume controls/IR receivers to a connecting block at my av equipment, works great. If you need any more specific info let me know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hello,


Thanks for the response.


What product are you using over cat 5 from Russound? I checked their website and all the IR products appear to come with wiring of their own.


Thanks again!
 

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All of the different companies that make IR equipment(niles,russound,xantech,etc) normally spec that you use 18/2 shielded, but cat 5 works just as well. Just make sure you have a ground in each pair or you may get interference.

TVtech1, xantech just came out with a tcp/ip version of the xtralink ir system. I don't know if it is shipping yet though.
 

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I was thinking of a similar system for the rear and side speakers in 7.1 surround my mom used to be in telecom and told me I could use sheilded cat5e , never seen it but she said its real so i guess but would this be sufficient to block interferrence if so would one pair work for the SUB


I know numbers are off with the sub in the mix
 

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Cat 5 can't carry the low frequencies needed for a sub. The placement of a sub in a room is usually not important so just place it as close to the equipment as you need to in order to use the proper cabling. You can use RG6 for the sub run. Cat5 will work for higher frequency speakers (to a point). Not a "great" solution but if you don't really care about quality sound, cat 5 may work.
 

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Quote:
Cat 5 can't carry the low frequencies needed for a sub
This is nonesense, of course a pair of copper wires can conduct low frequency AC....even th elowest frequency...DC!

Quote:
The placement of a sub in a room is usually not important so just place it as close to the equipment as you need to in order to use the proper cabling
The actual physical placement of the sub is very important.
 

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TonyBDA - That's what I thought until I read the details on a number of audiophile sites. Essentially, the wavelength of the subs is "usually" so large that placement is irrelevent according to them. The proper phase is important and direction it points in is important. You could argue that placing it near a wall might increase the base effect but I assume most people in these forums have high end gear and that the "acoustic" properties of the wall would be detrimental to the effect (There is no "wall classification for THX). Unless your room is greater than 20 feet deep, the wave is usually longer than the room itself (from what I have read). Sorry, I have no exact references (because this is not a flame I carry) but rather my relaying what I learned some 10 years ago.
 

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A wavelength of 27hz is exactly 21'. Any frequency above that(basically all that you can hear)will have a shorter wavelength(63hz is 9') and the potential for an intersection to create multiple standing waves in one spot, so yes it is critical to place the sub in the correct position. There are ways around it, with extra equipment and a good bit of time to equalize it, but it is easier to move a sub 5'.
 

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Wavelength of 27hz = 36444444.44444445 feet, the higher the frequency, the shorter the wavelength. A formula for wavelength is:


wavelength(meters) = 300 / frequency in MHz


or you can use the website calculator at:
http://www.csgnetwork.com/freqwavelengthcalc.html
 

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You are correct that the wavelength of 27 Hz is 36444444.44444445 feet, if it is an electromagnetic wave(ie. radiowave). The wavelength of a 27 Hz sound wave, which is a mechanical wave that travels at 1130 feet per second is 42 feet. If you use the elctromagnetic formula for sound, Your sound would be traveling at just under 700 miles a second and not 1130 feet per second. I was incorrect in my above post about it being 21', that is where the standing wave would be.

wavelength(feet)=1130/frequency in hz
 

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Sorry about that. I've spent most of my working life dealing with electronics and when I saw 'wavelength' I jumped with out considering the context.
 
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