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Someone just told me that composite video connections are only capable of 250 lines of resolution. I thought that the advantage of upgrading to S- or component video was the color-signal seperation, not increased lines-of-resolution capacity. Does anyone know which it is?
 

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IMO, a composite input should be able to provide 330 lines per picture height (the broadcast NTSC standard), or about 440 lines across a 4:3 screen. A DVD or laserdisc could deliver somewhat more b&w resolution (check numerous DVD FAQ sites for discussion). S-video, with the color and luminance separate, delivers clearer pictures since the two types of signals aren't 'combed' together.


While component inputs won't provide more b&w resolution, they can provide much better color resolution. In their "The Perfect Vision" (July/August 2000) article, "Exploding Seven Deadly Video Myths," Alen Koebel and Greg Rogers point out that component outputs from DVD players can deliver color bandwidths of up to 3 MHz, which equates to some 320 possible color changes across a screen width. By contrast, filtering often reduces S-video bandwidth to some 0.5 MHz, equal to about 50 changes. In smaller screen areas, they point out, S-video signals can't change quickly enough and may not appear at all. They suggest using the test pattern title 20, chapter 2, of the Video Essentials DVD to easily contrast S-video/component differences. (There may be an Avia equivalent; the VE title has small red-cyan and

blue-yellow stripe patterns at 0.5, 1, and 1.5 MHz. S-video may appear very dim or with no color at 1.5 MHz. Suspect it'll be more obvious on larger-screen sets, too.) -- John


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STOP DVI/HDCP AND DFAST




[This message has been edited by John Mason (edited 06-11-2001).]
 
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