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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The local building inspector just left me with some bad news. He was here for my rough electrical inspection. I have already had my structural framing inspection done and now he informs me that the playwood I removed from the wall was not just a firewall, but for structural integrity (here is a picture of the plywood in question, before it was removed.)


I told him the previous inspector had no problem with it being gone, and that I had already passed structural inspection, and that to add it now would be a MAJOR pain in the butt!


This is the same wall now . I have mounted all of the electrical, a new HVAC supply duct, projector conduit and a new stud wall in front of the old wall, and he is telling me to put the plywood back!!


To his credit, he is getting the engineering dept. to see if there is another alternative involving strapping and blocking. That would, in his words, be "ony a twelve cuss word job!" ;) He was very apologetic for the mix up, and I have to agree with him that since this is an earthquake zone, it needs to be fixed.


Other than that, he had only minor problems with the electrical, like requiring wire nuts on ground wires instead of just twisting them together. Easy stuff to fix.


Hopefully this won't set me back too much! I'm still shooting for a Super Bowl grand opening party!
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by cgblack
...now he informs me that the playwood I removed...
Is that a double wall?

Can you re- install the plywood on the other side?


I bet, even with this little set back, you still make you dead line.

Good luck, jdb
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Actually we looked at that and it won't work since it is an irregular shaped, finished laundry room on the other side.


I know it's only a minor setback in the large scheme of things, but it is none the less annoying.


I think I can get the wood in there, it's just lifting all of the electrical that was attached to the outside wall that is a bummer. Attaching the wood to the header is another thing all together. Only about 2" of clearance in behind the hvac duct.
 

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Well, in that case, if you run out of cuss words, give me a call - I've got a million of 'em.


2" isn't much (just ask my girfriend) but given the right kind of motivation, like say "The Vidikron Vision One front projector" and I bet you could manage to park a boat in that space.


In two minutes flat. jdb
 

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The wood you removed is called OSB (oreinted strand board). When nailed to the wall it creates a shear wall. It probubly had arrows on one side going up and down.


Hopefully they have a suggestion for an alternative solution.


If you have to put it back up and you have tight places to nail

look at using a palm nailer. Its an air tool for driving nails that fits in the palm of your hand. I just spent alot of time with one nailing off all the metal strapping on my new addition. I added 1600 sq ft and had over

$750.00 in metal strapping and tie downs for the earthquake engineering


Good ole California. Earhquake country.



Cy
 

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Would putting in long screws be easier than nailing? Are screws allowed?
 

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Quote:
Hopefully they have a suggestion for an alternative solution.
Being a construction inspector, I cannot think of any reason why you would not be able to use metal strapping for this wall. Seams silly to me but then I'm not that familiar with earthquake codes. But I am familiar with Florida (hurricane) codes and we don't spec osb for interior shear walls, just strapping.


Brian
 

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Earthquakes, hurricanes... sounds like it is time to move here to the lower end of tornado alley. I don't know of any tornado codes that we have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Fortunately, their engineering dept. has calculated that 3 sets of straps in an "X" configuration will be enough to retain the shear strength of the wall. I also do not need to put blocking in behind the straps, just nail them at every stud, and a couple of nails at the top and bottom plates.


Screws are definitely out. I have to use the thick, joist hanger nails that are made of tempered steel for increased shear strength.


Thanks for the palm nailer suggestion. I've been looking for a good excuse to get a compressor anyway ;) and I think this will be the only way to get this done. The fun part will be attaching these 6 straps with tension! Having to reach in behind studs to get to the outside studs, while pulling on the straps definitely sounds like a two person job. I'm going to have to start at the top plate and work down, since there is very little room up in there. The nice thing is I can feed these straps under all the wiring etc. so I don't have to remove everything and start again. Whew!


I knew the stuff on the walls was called OSB, I just referred to it as plywood so the novices would know what i was talking about ;)


Thanks for all the replies, suggestions and general support. It's nice to know that I'm not one my own in this.
 

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I am surprised OSB in a wet wall is allowable. jdb


Aside:


Tell you what, I would suffer a quake any day over a tornado.


The only rule to a quake is that, "what's above your head may fall on your head", where as in a tornado you can be hit with a flying cow from miles away.


Loma Prieta was the last quake I went through. Lived in Santa Cruz. Tore the little place to shreds. I think that the ground can move under your feet at any given moment lends a bit to the concept of "California living", along with the ocean, of course, and the Redwoods, and lets not leave out the deserts, or...well to many things to list. Only thing that's hard to find is "elbow room".


The upshot of a tornado is that they cut a swath of destruction rather then disrupting whole regions. Have yet to be harmed by one.


Knock on wood, jdb
 

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My god, Move to the Pacific Northwest......Nothing like any of that happens out here. I was stationed in Jacksonville North Carolina for a year and a half and no tornadoes, hurricanes, or earthquakes.


Man I lead a sheltered life!!!! :D



Ron
 

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Volcanoes
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Toxarch
Earthquakes, hurricanes... sounds like it is time to move here to the lower end of tornado alley. I don't know of any tornado codes that we have.
See now that would be code number id10t and it goes a little something like this "Hold my beer, I'm gettin' the camcorder!"


Stieferman
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well I've nearly finished fixing the problem. Turns out the straps would end up costing $150, and be just as hard to install, so I cut the OSB in half and put in some blocking. It was able to fit reasonably easily that way. I'm still messing with trying to nail it up top, without having to buy a palm nailer (which I don't even think will fit).


I do have access over top of the heating duct, and I've devised a long distance nailer. It's a 2' steel pipe with a 3' steel rod through it. I use powered fasteners since they have a little collar that keeps them level in the pipe. Works like a charm.


So far it has only been about a half dozen cuss word job! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Probelm solved. Let's hope it passes muster (and inspection!) As with almost evertything I've done, there is a photographic record of it via my signature link below. It's on Page 3 - The MISHAP!!


Thanks again everyone. Now it's insulation time - ughhh!
 
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