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I've seen some folks post about using hospital-grade receptacles for HT equipment use and wondered if anyone else had suggestions. I'm about to get a bump-out closet built for our HT equipment and am trying to plan out the receptacle(s) in the closet. I've got a dedicated circuit for the closet components.


One other question I have is this -- can I trust the surge protection on those outlets and not do some kind of surge protection component, or should I have both?


Anything else I should consider while we're on the power/receptacle/surge topic?
 

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Jambo - I am no electrician or expert, but here are my thoughts;


* A dedicated circuit is good, make it 20 amp instead of 15 amp


* Put in a double gang outlet box with 2 duplex outlets


* Use hospital grade outlets if you like, they are higher quality


* I would not use GFI outlets, they can trip without much load


* Plug all your equipment into a surge protector/power management

device, (monster, Niles, Panamax.....).


* Remember to include ventilation for the equipment closet if you are

going to put doors on it.


Just my thoughts, Reed.
 

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This is definitely one topic area that will elicit a lot of disagreements.


I just finished installing Hubbell 8300I outlets (hospital grade, isolated ground) in my rack. Got them here for $12.50 a pop (vs. about $35 at other places)...these outlets are also the basis for the PS Audio PowerPort $50 outlet. Sure, could be a waste of money (vs. the $3 spec grade outlets at Home Depot), but in the overall budget, this is chump change, so what the hay. For what it's worth, I had all the outlets for my theater wired as dedicated circuits--3x20A for the amps, 1x15A for the projector, 2x20A for the rack equipment, 1x20A for the powered sub. Lots of people told me I am stupid and wasting money--nothing new here! :)


WARNING: these type of outlets offer NO protection from surges, etc. They are just a "heavy duty" outlet--they are NOT a safety net to protect your equipment. You will still need a surge protector or line conditioner to handle that. After much research, I think Brickwall makes very affordable, tank quality stuff to protect your equipment. Take a look here .
 

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Another consideration might be a rack mount type power conditioner. Furman, Gemini, ETA, and Power Werks make them, to name a few. They usually offer surge/spike protection, RFI/noise filtering, local circuit breaker and have 8-10 outlets. They come in 15 or 20 amp models. Some also have dimmable pop-out lights and power meters.


I'm considering this route myself.


Andy
 

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Quote:
1x15A for the projector, 2x20A for the rack equipment, 1x20A for the powered sub. Lots of people told me I am stupid and wasting money--nothing new here!
Holy moly...that's pretty much 7400 watts of power for amplification (and ancillary components). Thats over 1200 wpc in a 6 channel system. I think you should consider it a wast to have all that electricity and not enough "things" utilizing it all. I'd talk to your wife/other and explain to her that your are: grossly underutilizing your current resources and require a modest investment to realize the full potential of your infrastructure.


Then, go out and buy 5 700 watt RMS monoblocks (you wanna leave some room for them to spike up to 1200 watts). Then invite me over to destroy our ears together.


:p


pc
 

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Patrick...funny you should mention the need to add things to the mix!:)


Due to a weird set of circumstances, it looks like one of my amps (a 300x3) is being changed out for three 300x1 monos...so one shared 1.5kVA power supply becomes three distinct 1.5kVA power supplies, added to the existing four 1.5kVA power supplies (two 300x2 amps). I'm out of dedciated circuits, though...and people said I was nuts for putting 5 20A circuits in the rack! Two amps are going to have to share, I guess. I can think of worse things...
 

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Alex,


I've been considering having an electrician come out and re-work the power for my theater and wondered if I could ask you a couple of questions. Did you have these built in during construction or add them later? If you know, how big of a deal is it to add dedicated lines after the fact? Also, when people are talking about dedicated lines, do they mean a breaker on the shared box for just the theater or are they talking about a truly separate line that has its own hot, common, and ground?


Just making sure I ask for the right thing and wanting to know what I'm going to be looking at effort wise.


Thanks,

Robert
 

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If you are going to install hospital grade outlets, it is especially important that you install outlets rated for intensive care rooms, not good condition rooms.
 

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Robert:


I am by no means an expert--I relied on an electrician to do the work, and yes, there were mistakes (e.g., installed a 30A breaker instead of a 15A, later fixed). My HT project was part of finishing off two rooms in the basement--we ended up adding a new HVAC zone (which required a new panle pulled off the existing main panel) and we pulled a 3rd panel off the main just for the HT. I may be way off base here, but my understanding of "dedciated circuit" is where each outlet has its own breaker on the panel (e.g., 1:1 ratio)...all circuits/breakers are same phase, same leg, sharing a common ground. I am sure there are other, more "sound" ways to do this (e.g., pull a new line from the street), but I didn't explore them.


I wish I had had something much more knowledgeable than me during the wiring phase, since my electrician (despite having a great reputation) really wasn't wise to the little things that can make a big difference...start grounding, etc. I called about 5 of the biggest electricians in the city to see if they'd ever done any serious HT work and a I got lot of pregnant pauses...no one had any experience. They just treated the job as a normal one...not anything deeply wrong about that, but since everything else about the project was "different" (double sheetrocking, special HVAC considerations, etc.), I was disappointed...but couldn't find an electrician who instilled any sense of comfort with me. Most hadn't even heard of star grounding!


One thing I would definitely rethink: using outlet boxes that sit on the wall, not in the wall. The latter can look tacky, but you don't have to worry about introducing semi-large holes in your walls, which cuts down on noise transmission...my rack area butts up to the HT room itself, and having 5 gang box holes in the wall facing the HT eats up about 3-4" of the 8" deep wall. Small point, but could be meaningful.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by QQQ
If you are going to install hospital grade outlets, it is especially important that you install outlets rated for intensive care rooms, not good condition rooms.
OK, I'll be the gullible newbie and ask: you're joking, right? Just double checking because I'm never exactly sure when it comes to high-end audio / video and tweaks vs. jokes. :)
 

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You can also find Leviton surge protected hospital receptacles for only $25. Good for ceiling mounted projectors, etc. Look under receptacles, models 8280/8380.

Find them here
 

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You mean a GREEN pen, don't you? :)


Say what you will about a $12.50 outlet vs. a $0.69 outlet, but the $12.50 outlets hold onto the power cord like there's no tomorrow--no chance of these things pulling out from the sag of gravity, etc. I can't say that for the el cheapo outlets I have in my house or the spec grade ones either. Could just be a coincidence, though!
 

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Oh!!!! :eek: That's where I went wrong! I knew I should have been more suspicious when the guy sold it to me for so cheap...but then he threw in these great magic beans and how could I pass that up? You live and you learn.


I agree that quality construction is worth paying for and you're right: given the cost of the overall system, a few extra dollars for a quality outlet seems like a wise decision.


-Robert
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by bart_75243
QQQ,


Thanks. I figured as much but you never know. I thought for the longest time that people were joking about the red pen on the edge of the CD thing.;)


Robert
No, no, no! The red pen is for DVD. The green pen is for CD. ;)


Mike
 

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What the heck are you people talking about the green or red pen. Did I miss that thread where people were making these jokes?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Toxarch
What the heck are you people talking about the green or red pen. Did I miss that thread where people were making these jokes?
Sorry, my fault there. QQQ made a joke about making sure the outlets were rated for intensive care units and I asked if he was joking, alluding to the whole "pen on the CD" thing, which depending on who you talk to is either 1)one of the Audio Emperor's new scams or 2)an amazing audio tweak.


Without starting a flame war, there seems to healthy debate regarding how things like power outlets can affect your sound or video.
 

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Thanks Bart. I understood the part about the plugs. I just never heard the pen part before. Guess I haven't made it over to that part of the forums yet. Most of my time is spent in Constuction and sometimes Projectors and Screens.
 
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