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Discussion Starter #1
In preparation for my 2 UXL 18's coming in the next few months (I'm in group two so it may take a while), I'm ordering an Inuke 6000 DSP and going to use it to power my SI 18 marty's... they are the D2 Marty's (I originally went with an IPR 3000 using 840 watts per channel along with a mini dsp unbalanced and I'm retiring that to the bedroom subs when I have the chance) so I can't wire them both off of one side etc, I'll have to use the signal limiters. my question is , I swore I heard a while back that the signal limiters on the Inuke weren't working right and sending too much signal. Is that the case or did I get my info wrong and I can use them to send about 1000 watts of power to my martys using this method and not over power them? Sorry for hte dumb question, but I've been looking for the last few hours and can't find info about that statement of the signal limiters acting up so I wanted to make sure first
 

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Discussion Starter #2
that amp will put out about the right power for the driver for ht.


are you planning on sustained duration music blasting?
no, no music at all, just HT... and power I knew it would deliver in spades for the SI HT 18... I was just really wondering about how effective the signal limiters worked... I wanted to make sure it wasn't going to fry my drivers while I use it for my my SI's in prep for my UXL 18s
 

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I deleted my post because I misread yours. the 6000dsp is good power for uxl on ht content. but then I saw the question about limiting for siht drivers. lol
 

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ricci measured the d2 at 3.5 ohms. 1000 watts into 3.5 ohms requires 59.16 volts rms, which is 83.65 volts peak.


the limiter in the inuke, iirc, is peak limiter, so should be set somewhere around there.
I remember some confusion about peak limiters, but I can't recall one not working.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
ricci measured the d2 at 3.5 ohms. 1000 watts into 3.5 ohms requires 59.16 volts rms, which is 83.65 volts peak.


the limiter in the inuke, iirc, is peak limiter, so should be set somewhere around there.
I remember some confusion about peak limiters, but I can't recall one not working.
ahhh, that may be what I'm remembering. I know NotYT is testing the inuke so I'm hoping he may have some insight on the limiter and the voltage to set it at
 

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lol, I was actually just reading that now. please forgive me for being stupid but I didn't see where you listed the voltages needed to estimate the 1000-1100 watt RMS (although it's more that it limits at peak which is about 2000-2200 watts in reality)...
If you have the DSP model, enter your load values and turn the knob until you get the wattage you want.

(Vp / Math.sqrt(2))^2 / R = Wattage

If you want a 2kW limit into a 3.5 ohm load...

2000 = ( Vp / Math.sqrt(2) )^2 / 3.5
Math.sqrt(2) * Math.sqrt(7000) = Vp

Vp = 118V

If you want a 1kW limiter, 84Vp.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If you have the DSP model, enter your load values and turn the knob until you get the wattage you want.

(Vp / Math.sqrt(2))^2 / R = Wattage

If you want a 2kW limit into a 3.5 ohm load...

2000 = ( Vp / Math.sqrt(2) )^2 / 3.5
Math.sqrt(2) * Math.sqrt(7000) = Vp

Vp = 118V

If you want a 1kW limiter, 84Vp.


kewl beans. and just to make sure I'm understanding. that 2000 with Vp of 118V is for PEAK power? meaning for an SI 18 D2 that's what I'd be after (to estimate the equivalent for a 1000 ish watt RMS power load .... pleas correct me if I'm wrong. Math was never my best subject in school
 

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kewl beans. and just to make sure I'm understanding. that 2000 with Vp of 118V is for PEAK power? meaning for an SI 18 D2 that's what I'd be after (to estimate the equivalent for a 1000 ish watt RMS power load .... pleas correct me if I'm wrong. Math was never my best subject in school
I'm not really sure what you mean by peak power. Wattage is based off of RMS voltage. Vp of 118 will allow for 2000 watts of power.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I'm not really sure what you mean by peak power. Wattage is based off of RMS voltage. Vp of 118 will allow for 2000 watts of power.
I must have misunderstood, I was under the assumption that the Inuke 6000 limiter was based off of PEAK wattage, not RMS, but if the calculations you gave for 84v puts out RMS 1000 watts (ish) and 118v puts out 2000 RMS watts then I'll definitely be setting my SI 18's to 84v on the limiter so as not to cook that sucker (on further glancing it looks like I mixed up the voltage with the wattage displayed on screen when you set the limiter, so adjusting to a certain voltage will make for an accurate RMS wattage measurement rather than going by the "watts" displayed on the Inuke software screen)
 

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Limiter settings are based on RMS wattage. There is a complex way to do described by Bossobass with a volt meter. The easier way using the I Nukes is setting the RMS wattage at a give ohm level. The attack and release should also be set for the limiters to work correctly.

I use 5 and 20 ms for attack and release on my amps.:)
 

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Very interesting. I have the 3kdsp and it is driving 2 ht18d4's at a 2ohm load per channel. I understand how to set it ( mine is set at -2.5dbfs 63.7vp 1015w ).

derrick said this: Limiter settings are based on RMS wattage. There is a complex way to do described by Bossobass with a volt meter. The easier way using the I Nukes is setting the RMS wattage at a give ohm level. The attack and release should also be set for the limiters to work correctly.

I use 5 and 20 ms for attack and release on my amps.

Can you explain the attack and release method to clarify for me please?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Lol. Now I'm even more confused. That other thread LTD02 and notnyt linked to states that's its based off peak wattage and now we have people saying its off rms
 

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There's no such thing as RMS watts and peak watts for an AC signal. You have to use the RMS voltage of an AC signal to calculate power. Don't confuse RMS voltage and peak voltage with marketing "peak wattage" specs. They have nothing to do with each other.

Remember that the signal is alternating current. Sometimes that wave is at a high voltage level, sometimes it drops down to 0 volts. DC current has constant voltage all the time. So with DC voltage, power in watts is just volts times amps, because voltage is constant. But with AC, voltage is not constant, so you need to know what the average voltage is. So RMS is the mean (average) voltage of the AC wave. So power for an AC signal is RMS volts times watts.

1000 watts into 3.5 ohms requires 59.16 volts rms, which is 83.65 volts peak
So using that example, the AC wave varies from 0 volts up to 83.65 volts. The average voltage is 59.16 volts, which is the number you use for calculating power in watts. Thus 59.16 volts into 3.5 ohms is 16.9 amps, and 16.9 amps * 59.16 volts is 1000 watts.

Alternate reading on the matter:
http://www.nuffieldfoundation.org/practical-physics/explaining-rms-voltage-and-current
 

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Discussion Starter #17
There's no such thing as RMS watts and peak watts for an AC signal. You have to use the RMS voltage of an AC signal to calculate power. Don't confuse RMS voltage and peak voltage with marketing "peak wattage" specs. They have nothing to do with each other.

Remember that the signal is alternating current. Sometimes that wave is at a high voltage level, sometimes it drops down to 0 volts. DC current has constant voltage all the time. So with DC voltage, power in watts is just volts times amps, because voltage is constant. But with AC, voltage is not constant, so you need to know what the average voltage is. So RMS is the mean (average) voltage of the AC wave. So power for an AC signal is RMS volts times watts.


So using that example, the AC wave varies from 0 volts up to 83.65 volts. The average voltage is 59.16 volts, which is the number you use for calculating power in watts. Thus 59.16 volts into 3.5 ohms is 16.9 amps, and 16.9 amps * 59.16 volts is 1000 watts.

Alternate reading on the matter:
http://www.nuffieldfoundation.org/practical-physics/explaining-rms-voltage-and-current
thanks for the explanation. that makes more sense. that still begs the question, what voltage to set on the inuke 6000, peak voltage or RMS voltage since NotNYT mentioned setting it at 84 volts for 1000 watts, while RMS is at 59.16 volts
 

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Limiter settings are based on RMS wattage. There is a complex way to do described by Bossobass with a volt meter. The easier way using the I Nukes is setting the RMS wattage at a give ohm level. The attack and release should also be set for the limiters to work correctly.

I use 5 and 20 ms for attack and release on my amps.:)
No, the limiter settings are based on voltage.


thanks for the explanation. that makes more sense. that still begs the question, what voltage to set on the inuke 6000, peak voltage or RMS voltage since NotNYT mentioned setting it at 84 volts for 1000 watts, while RMS is at 59.16 volts
It's a voltage limiter, not a wattage limiter. It limits by peak voltage. Using known parameters, you can calculate the max wattage. I did the math for you before. The DSP interface will list wattage based on the specified load and voltage. This is just for display to give you an idea of the power levels. The entered load values are irrelevant as is the displayed wattage. It's just an aid, and is not factored into the limiting. It only cares about peak voltage.
 

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Will the INuke 6000 'fully' power 2 UXLs, meaning, if turned all the way up - is that as much power as the UXLs are recommended to take? FYI.. I am planning two, large ported/ full size marty enclosures, tuned to ~16hz (and I'll figure out the limiter work around that is posted in various places).

I am in on the 1st round of UXL group buys, and want to decide on an Amp soon.

If the iNuke 6000 can't push these two the limit, then I might go for a Clone FP14000... a bit more expensive, but don't want to let the UXLs rest at all ;-)

Kevin
 

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Discussion Starter #20
No, the limiter settings are based on voltage.




It's a voltage limiter, not a wattage limiter. It limits by peak voltage. Using known parameters, you can calculate the max wattage. I did the math for you before. The DSP interface will list wattage based on the specified load and voltage. This is just for display to give you an idea of the power levels. The entered load values are irrelevant as is the displayed wattage. It's just an aid, and is not factored into the limiting. It only cares about peak voltage.
thanks, that's what I was wanting to verrify, especially after reading Derrick's comment about RMS... so that means to get 1000 watts RMS I'd be aiming for about 84 volts by my calculations. much appreciated on your help
 
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