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I just built a new sub (dual SI D4 HT18s) to replace the one I built about 9 months ago (single Dayton HF 15"). I wired the coils of each sub in series and the subs themselves in parallel. I switched the speakon connectors so that the negative cable in plugged into the 2+ holes (the positive side is still connected to the 1+). I have an rca to xlr connecting my receiver to channel A input (just like before) and the speakon connected to the channel A output. I have the inuke set to bridge mode in the software (had to do it through the front panel since I misplaced the usb cable for connecting to a computer). I am getting no sound whatsoever. Also the input lights on the front panel aren't coming on at all. What am I doing wrong?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I just removed the speakon mount from the back of my sub and noticed that the positive cable was soldered to the wrong terminal. I'll switch the speakon wiring and report back. Not sure why the input lights weren't even coming on before though
 

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If you have 2 separate enclosures ( I have a similar set-up )each sub needs to be wired in series 8ohm per sub. the speakon +1,+2 set the amp to bridged mode the amp will see 4ohm per channel.
Another way using the same subs wire each one in parallel 2ohm per sub the speakon now have to be wired +1,-1 select either bi-amp or dual mono.
 

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It's one enclosure. I switched the speakon connector to match the speakon mount and it still didn't do anything. Then I switched the speakon connector on the amp side to 1+/1- and changed the settings to dual mono and now the input lights are coming on but still no sound

 

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The way you have it wired the amp is seeing a 2ohm load it will not do that in bridged mode 4ohm is max. You would be okay leaving the subs wired as you have them but switch the speakon to +1,-1 and use one channel and run it stereo bi-amp or dual mono.If you had this running before for any length of time it is possible your amp did not like it very much. I hate to assume but you are only using one side of the amp for the subs?
 

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The way you have it wired the amp is seeing a 2ohm load it will not do that in bridged mode 4ohm is max. You would be okay leaving the subs wired as you have them but switch the speakon to +1,-1 and use one channel and run it stereo bi-amp or dual mono.If you had this running before for any length of time it is possible your amp did not like it very much. I hate to assume but you are only using one side of the amp for the subs?
They're D4s so it's a 4ohm load. I ended up getting them working. I ran a bass sweep from YouTube and even with only one light coming on the house sounded like it was going to collapse lol
 

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Glad you got it working but the way the wiring goes if you take the 2 d4's and wire the coils in series you wind up with two 8 ohm subs now you take both of these and wire them in parallel you effectively have one 4ohm sub. If you are using the bridged mode of the amp the amp sees half of that 2ohm. I have read in bridged mode either 8 or 4 not 2 if you want to run a 2 ohm load it has to be bi-amp stereo or dual mono. It is your amp I am just telling you what I have read about the amp it even says on the owners manual bridged mode at 4ohms. Good Luck
 

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nw, the subs are wired for 4 ohms net. hooking that up the inuke3000 in bridge mode is ok and will present a 4 ohm load.
 

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Maybe I am wrong 2 d4 each coil wired in series 8ohm per sub, 2 8ohm subs wired in parallel 4ohm. If the amp is in bridged mode the amp sees half which is 2 correct?
 

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Maybe I am wrong 2 d4 each coil wired in series 8ohm per sub, 2 8ohm subs wired in parallel 4ohm. If the amp is in bridged mode the amp sees half which is 2 correct?
Not correct. How you wire the amp does not change the impedance of the load.

If the load is 4 ohms, that's what the amp sees.

Going to bridged mode generally doubles the lowest impedance you can run on a single channel.

ie, an amp that can run at 2ohm stereo will only be able to run at 4 ohms bridged.
 

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Now I am lost I understand series and parallel wiring not a problem I guess I am clueless on what it means to bridge an amplifier? If I took one D4 sub wired the coils in series I made it an 8ohm driver if I did the opposite it is a 2ohm driver, series add parallel subtracts. Does bridging the amp have more to do with output voltage?
 

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I was looking up what happens when you bridge an amplifier.

Bridging an amp cuts the resistance load (measured in ohms) in half, which can cause it to overheat. Be sure to check your manual (or the manufacturer’s website) to see whether or not your amp can function at half the ohms it currently uses.

This is what I have always thought so is this wrong?
 

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I was looking up what happens when you bridge an amplifier.

Bridging an amp cuts the resistance load (measured in ohms) in half, which can cause it to overheat. Be sure to check your manual (or the manufacturer’s website) to see whether or not your amp can function at half the ohms it currently uses.

This is what I have always thought so is this wrong?
That's only if you change the load, for example.

you have two 4ohm speakers, each wired on their own channel. The amp will see 4 ohm load per channel.

If you run the amp bridged, and then run the speakers in parallel, it will then be a two ohm load, this is because of how the load is configured.

You could also run them in series, and then they'd be an 8 ohm load.

Another example....

you have amp in stereo mode, 1 channel with a 4 ohm speaker. You then convert this to bridged mode, it's still a 4 ohm load.
 

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So what was wrong? These questions come up a lot so it helps to have closure so we can help the next guy. Even if it was a dumb mistake we can add it to the list of things we ask the next guy.

You should be able to run those two right up to the edge of the red lights. You should turn on the limiter at -.5db (not -5db) just for protection.
 

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So what was wrong? These questions come up a lot so it helps to have closure so we can help the next guy. Even if it was a dumb mistake we can add it to the list of things we ask the next guy.

You should be able to run those two right up to the edge of the red lights. You should turn on the limiter at -.5db (not -5db) just for protection.
The limiter is actually always in place, even at 0db.
 

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That's only if you change the load, for example.

you have two 4ohm speakers, each wired on their own channel. The amp will see 4 ohm load per channel.

If you run the amp bridged, and then run the speakers in parallel, it will then be a two ohm load, this is because of how the load is configured.

You could also run them in series, and then they'd be an 8 ohm load.

Another example....

you have amp in stereo mode, 1 channel with a 4 ohm speaker. You then convert this to bridged mode, it's still a 4 ohm load.[/QUOTE

I hate being a pain but humor me please if you have 2 D4 subs wire them in series then the load changes to 8ohms per sub. Now if you take the same 2 subs that were just wired in series and now connect them in parallel connected to one channel of the amp what do you have? What you wrote is how I understand I do not understand how you can take two D4 subs wire the coils in series then connect the subs in parallel and still come up with a 4ohm load all on one channel ?
Back when I was in car stereo we would take to 8ohm subs wire them in parallel then bridge the amp the amp would then see a 2ohm load. If you do absolutely nothing I agree a 4 or 8ohm speaker just using one channel nothing has changed it is still either 4 or 8 but if you do a combo of series parallel it will be different. Okay I will be quiet I am done.
 

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That's only if you change the load, for example.

you have two 4ohm speakers, each wired on their own channel. The amp will see 4 ohm load per channel.

If you run the amp bridged, and then run the speakers in parallel, it will then be a two ohm load, this is because of how the load is configured.

You could also run them in series, and then they'd be an 8 ohm load.

Another example....

you have amp in stereo mode, 1 channel with a 4 ohm speaker. You then convert this to bridged mode, it's still a 4 ohm load.
I hate being a pain but humor me please if you have 2 D4 subs wire them in series then the load changes to 8ohms per sub. Now if you take the same 2 subs that were just wired in series and now connect them in parallel connected to one channel of the amp what do you have? What you wrote is how I understand I do not understand how you can take two D4 subs wire the coils in series then connect the subs in parallel and still come up with a 4ohm load all on one channel ?
Back when I was in car stereo we would take to 8ohm subs wire them in parallel then bridge the amp the amp would then see a 2ohm load. If you do absolutely nothing I agree a 4 or 8ohm speaker just using one channel nothing has changed it is still either 4 or 8 but if you do a combo of series parallel it will be different. Okay I will be quiet I am done.
a d4 sub wired in series at 8 ohms. If you wire two of these in parallel, this gives you a 4 ohm load.

What you're saying you did in car audio is incorrect. If you wire two 8 ohm subs in parallel, you have a 4 ohm load, not a 2 ohm load.
 
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