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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've looked around for this info, but cant seem to find the definitive word.


As I understand it, the DVR985 does an inverse telecine (29.97 -> 24fps)

on material that it detects as sourced from film - aka film detection.


If so, does the DVR95 burn the MPEG2 as a resulting 24fps video?


In other words, is the MPEG2 encoder stage after, or before, the film detection/deinterlacing

stage?


i.e. is the film detection/de-interlacing/inverse telecine circuitry considered

part of the "recorder" or is it considered part of the "progressive scan DVD player" ?


Finally, how good is the deinterlacing? Unfortunately, it was not tested as part of

the excellent Progressive Scan DVD Shootout (available here )?


thank you.


- VV
 

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It uses Faroudja FLI2200 to deinterlace (so it's supposed to be pretty good). People did complain that the output image (not the one being burnt onto the DVD) is a tad soft.


The FLI2200 outputs progressive output at 29.97p (i.e., it recreates a new 3:2 sequence), which supposedly gets flagged correctly into the DVD.


That basically means that even if the source was video or film, a progressive DVD player (even a lousy one) should have a great progressive picture out of the unit (which will be consistantly viewed as "film mode" regardless of its true origins).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hmm ... while I think I understand what you mean, I am puzzled

by one of your comments. You say:


---


That basically means that even if the source was video or film, a progressive DVD

player (even a lousy one) should have a great progressive picture out of the unit (which will be consistantly viewed as "film mode" regardless of its true origins).


---


But, if the origin was not film (e.g. NTSC video) it could not have done any sort

of reverse pulldown, so we would still have a 29.97 *video* image - even

if deinterlaced, right? So, it wouldnt really be "film mode" (since it was never on film).


Unless you are using the term "film mode" to apply to a non interlaced 29.97 fps picture.

In which case, my original question still applies:


Is the burned MPEG2 stream stored as 24fps or 29.97fps? The reason 24fps would be

the "right thing" is that you'd be able to fit more data on the DVD and it would compress

better since there are 6 frames less per second to compress/encode.
 

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Again, regardless of whether the deinterlacer finds 3:2 pulldown or not, it reencodes everything back to 29.97.


If it finds 3:2, it basically reconstructs the frame in progressive (so there's no bad flagging problems).


If it doesn't, DCDi kicks in and basically does video mode deinterlacing. It reencodes the output back to 29.97.


From the progressive player's point of view, it's all "film mode" because the reencoding will always encode in 3:2 pulldown sequence (regardless of what kind of source it had). This means, no bad editing and no problems even if this is the worst progressive player on earth...


AFAIK, regular DVD players have 24fps and flags to mark the 3:2 pulldown. I think that the recorder encodes in 29.97fps (because video mode deinterlacing can't be switched down to 24fps).
 

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I very much doubt that the player deinterlaces the signal before recording. It is much, much, much more likely that it always records the interlaced signal as interlaced on the disc, and applies the deinterlacing only on output. Designing a player that actually recognized film sources and recorded them using the repeat-first-field flags and so forth would be much more expensive.


Don
 
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