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Ok i`m still a little new to this and i`m experimenting. I may or may not need RF but read and hopefully I can get a straight answer.


Now my equipment is not in a closed in area but more of a closet that will not have a direct point angle for the remote. Its more of a direct side angle. Will IR do? Or RF the only way to go?


I`m confused by emitters and extenders can someone give me a little break down how that works? Can I get 4 of these and jsut place them in view and all will be good with a IR remote? What else do I need
 

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Think of your IR remote as a flashlight. Some flashlights are weak, and some are strong. Most put out a pretty wide beam that bounces around the walls and other stuff in your room, so when you shine the flashlight you get light even in areas that it isn't pointing at directly. But if the flashlight is weak you don't get MUCH light there.


You don't see the light your IR remote puts out, but it is there. The commands it sends are done by blinking that light pretty fast. If the device being controlled can see the blinking light it will accept the command, even if the light it sees was bounced off a wall, the floor, or something else. All of your devices see the light at the same time, of course, but each command is encoded for a particular type or brand of device so the other devices just ignore it.


Some programmable remotes like the Prontos feature a strong light that works with many devices even if you are not directly pointing it at them. The remotes that come with most devices, on the other hand, are pretty weak and only work if you point them directly at the device.


For your stuff that's around the corner you may find that the IR remote works best if you don't point it directly at them, but rather at a nearby wall or floor that you can bounce the light off of. But unless your remote has a strong light that likely won't be all that reliable.


A repeater or extender is just an IR sensor that also has one or more lights for output -- usually at the end of individual wires. The output lights simply duplicate what the sensor sees. These lights are usually not all that strong since the expectation is that you will place them close to the devices to be controlled. The IR repeater itself has to be positioned so as to be able to see the light from your IR remote.


A radio (RF) remote works the same way except that the signal from the remote to the repeater is by radio, which means it can go through walls for modest distances. The repeater converts the radio signals to IR light output for its output light(s). The RF repeater can be in the cabinet or closet with your devices -- i.e., it doesn't have to see the remote's light, only hear its radio signal. The IR output lights from the RF repeater are, once again, placed close to the devices. All lights repeat the same signal so it doesn't matter which lights are near which devices. One light might be enough for multiple devices for example.

--Bob
 
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