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Discussion Starter #1
just a quick question...I am trying to calibrate my speakers and based on AVIA you need to set the volume to 75db. is that zero volume???? how would I know what that volume level is?
 

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You need to measure with a sound pressure level (SPL) meter. Typically the SPL meter is setup at your listening location. There are several threads that discuss the procedure. One of the most popular meters is Radio Shack's analog version. I believe it is around $20.

75 db is a reference used to set output levels from each speaker. This level gives realistic sound reproduction based on typical recorded levels. I believe the sub is usually set to 80 db, but those more familiar with the setup procedure should comment.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have an SPL meter and I understand how to set it up but my issue is the AVIA disc says set you amps volume level to about 75db and I was wondering what would that be?
 

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My receiver instructions suggest setting the speaker locations first, then setting the level. This compensates for speakers that are different distances from your listening position.

After that you should set the volume control on your receiver or preamp to an easy to remember level such as "00" as indicated on your receiver's display. With this setting you are not concerned about db level, it is only a point at which you can always start when adjusting your playback listening level. This way you can always set the volume control to your calibrated level if that is the level you choose to listen when playing DVD's.

You calibrate each speaker by going into the receiver's setup menu and choosing "speaker level". From this menu you will raise or lower the level of each speaker one at a time to reach the 75 db level on your SPL meter. The method to raise or lower the level depends on the manufacturer and model of the receiver. My instructions tell me to rotate my volume control to set the level. After you leave the speaker level setup, your receiver will remember the adjustments made.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
JTA: That exactly what I wanted to know...I beleive the Radio Shack SPL meter on goes by increments of 10 but that is no problem.


I assume I would need to do the same for the my subwoofer as well?
 

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All speakers that show up in your menu should be calibrated.

The Radio Shack meter should also be set to "C" weighting and SLOW response and choose the range that will allow 75 db to be indicated. I don't remember what increments are available. Memory is not what it used to be.
 

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Put the avia test disk on for the left front speaker. Using your remote adjust the master volume until the SPL meter reads 75 db. On my reciever it is around 60 on others it was 00 on another it was -10 there really is no correlation between that number on the receiver and the Db. Once you have determiend that the Left front speaker is at 75 Db tTHEN go into the setupmenu and adjust each speaker to match the front left.
 

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After you use a SPL meter and a test disk to find your 75dB volume setting, some receivers will allow you to then reset your volume control to this being the "0" volume setting. You would have to read your manual to find out how to do this.


Oh, and you would want to use your meter to set your speaker level settings first. If you set the overall volume to 0 first, then tweaked all of your speaker volume settings, the final result might be a 75dB setting that is off a dB or two on your volume control from where you started.


The receiver cannot possible know beforehand what the volume setting needs to be for your system to be producing a 75dB sound level. Your speakers and your room can affect this by several dB. So there is no factory setting that would prove to be reliable - although they might assume you have speakers with 90dB sensitivity in a medium sized room, and thus come pretty close.
 

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any DB can't be 0 on a sound meter by definition, but food for thought, the Radio shack one's are good about 1 in 3 in the sense of having any type of consistancy, and if you are going tha troute, I found using the digital one is better, althout twice the cost, it seems to not only give numbers, but also has allot more accuracy. I tried the analog and loaned it to people and we all had the problem of getting a reading, and then playing the same stuff and getting 10 to 12 db different reading with repeated control levels and sources.


75db is THX reference, and what most disks whether THX or not, use as the sound level that is exactly the same as a theater, but there are arguments that that doesn't adjust in anyway to your room, and so 75db could be 3 times as loud in your actual room because of many factors. Whatever you do, you just want every speaker to sound the same DB from the primary seating position and whatever that is, at any DB level is fine.


I have not used that on my last 3 devices, but if I do it again I will go the expert with the gear and the multiple mikes, and the computer programs, instead of me with that radio shack deal. Where I live there is a company that does a test and survey for free with calibration, and for 125 with calibration and 175 without will do all the setup for you by source even. My friend I referred said they did a very good job, and given the challenges of our rooms and equipment, I am pondering that right now because I finally got my amp situation handled and in a good way.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I set my volume to -25 which is just a bit lower than the volume we would usually listen at and I calibrated. The reason I went with the lower volume is because the SPL meter only does 70db or 80db an not 75 so I figured I'll just calibrate at a bit lower volume so I can end up with a little more output. I am really happy with the way it sounds.
 

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CodeEcks,

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but if you are usung an Radio Shack meter, your meter should be able to read 75dB. I believe that the 70dB and 80dB settings are range settings and represent the middle of that range. That is, when set to the 70dB setting, the meter should have a range of 60dB to 80dB. Likewise, at the 80dB setting, your meter should be able to read 70dB to 90dB.


-Steve
 

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Well if I understand correctly then that when the meter is set to 70db. the needle needs to read +5 for me to be at 75db. is that correct? and if it is at 80 then it needs to read -5 to be at 75db.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by CodeEcks
Well if I understand correctly then that when the meter is set to 70db. the needle needs to read +5 for me to be at 75db. is that correct? and if it is at 80 then it needs to read -5 to be at 75db.
correct.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Tom_Bombadil
After you use a SPL meter and a test disk to find your 75dB volume setting, some receivers will allow you to then reset your volume control to this being the "0" volume setting. You would have to read your manual to find out how to do this.


Oh, and you would want to use your meter to set your speaker level settings first. If you set the overall volume to 0 first, then tweaked all of your speaker volume settings, the final result might be a 75dB setting that is off a dB or two on your volume control from where you started.


The receiver cannot possible know beforehand what the volume setting needs to be for your system to be producing a 75dB sound level. Your speakers and your room can affect this by several dB. So there is no factory setting that would prove to be reliable - although they might assume you have speakers with 90dB sensitivity in a medium sized room, and thus come pretty close.
My receiver was almost dead-on. It automatically puts the volume at 82 absolute value (or 0 relative value) when hitting the test tone button. You are then supposed to calibrate to 75 db at that volume. Most of my speakers were only 1 or 2 db off (or exactly correct) in order to be 75 db at my listening position, with the internal test tones, at that pre-set volume level.


I have the onkyo tx-sr701 (a THX select receiver).
 
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