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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As in turning on your components well in advance to watch a movie. Just like a car on a cold day, it wouldn't be smart to drag race it the minute you start it up. But not sure how relevant it is to amp/pre/receiver/speakers.


Whats your take on this.

Does one component need it more than the others amp/pre/receiver/speakers?
 

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A CRT projector works best once it has been running for about 20 minutes - some say more. Class A power amps also need about 30 minutes warm up time for them to start to sound at its best. But it is unlikely you will find a pure Class A power amp in a home theatre.


For myself, I don't even use that rule. I fire everything up and start watching. Most pre/pro and even receivers have a standby mode so they are already kind of powered up.
 

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I just flip everything on and start watching within 2 minutes. My amps are on a triggered switch from the pre/pro, so I guess that's a kindof standby mode.
 

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Bean it is best to leave all components on, always for best performance. Everything will be at "idle" when not watching a movie, or listening to music so it will not draw much current.


From "The Ultimate Test CD" : "If you have solid state equipment, consider leaving it on all the time. It will not use up much electricity, or be dangerous, and won't wear out from being on. In fact more stress is put on the equipment when it's turned on, than from leaving it on. Why should you do this? Because many audiophiles and engineers claim it takes 24 hours for the electronics to warm up and sound best."


Try this: turn your system on and play a favorite piece of music-one your know well. Leave your system on for 24 hours and play the same piece again. If you hear no difference, don't bother leaving it on. But if the music sounds warmer, fuller, less harsh and more natural, don't shut it off!
 

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Warm up period I will go for. 24 hour warm up, sounds like BS to me. I'll believe the "leave it on 24/7" theory when I see scientific proof. Next someone will say to play pink noise 24/7 when not watching movies or listening to music.
 

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Bean,


What kind of gear do you have?


Some gear gets pretty hot when on for long durations. My old Rotel Pre Pro got pretty hot. My current pre/pro Bryston SP 1.7 gets very hot after 1 hr as the chassis is used as a heat sink for the power supplies. I was at an audio store recently and Audio Refinement power amps are pretty hot to the touch when they are on but idle'ng. So heat and electrical consumption is another factor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the feedback.


hometheaterguy: I know people who leave their gear on. Cycling off and on may not be good but for me - nah, too risky. I lost some good gear that way (power outage? I wasnt home so who knows could've been lightning) - once bitten twice shy.


Toxarch and EC: good to see others dont really worry about it. I try not to get up to reference levels immediately as a rule. I sometimes break that rule when listening to a good song. My gear is nothing fancy mid level receiver/monoblocks/speakers also HTPC abut not directly to the amps, yet. EC: I'm not worried about the heat I have good a/c.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well so far I heard 2 min and 24hrs. I think I will measure the temp on the stuff I can get to and see how long it takes to get it up to temp at idle. Hopefully it wont take long and then I will feel good about using that as a baseline.
 

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I'm with hometheaterguy on this one. I should think that were you to turn it off 30 minutes to 1 hour would be about right period of warm up. It takes my tube amp an hour to get right ( which is why I keep them in standby all of the time ). But as it is video you may not pay full attention to the audio so it may not matter to you. The difference is significant but it will not go from unlistenable to nirvana.


Alan
 

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Thanks Alan. I know commercial theaters always leave their amps and processors on. As far as the heat issue, that is the minority in this case. If adequate ventilation, or better yet a cooling system (AC) is built for the amp rack as is in a computer room keeping them on wouldn't hurt a bit. Maybe this guy from Stereophile is right, maybe it does make the sound better. Or maybe I do not want to turn on my 6 power amps, prepro, DVD player, and PJ twice a day.

The question you posed is subjective mainly. The best thing to do is do that test I mentioned at the last paragraph from my first post.
 

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Dunno if you are any safer having equipment off in the event of a lightening strike. Good question though. Unplugged equipment, sure. If the components are grounded to earth you get some protection against voltage surges and built-up static charges. Using a line conditioner provides further protection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by hometheaterguy
Dunno if you are any safer having equipment off in the event of a lightening strike. Good question though. Unplugged equipment, sure. If the components are grounded to earth you get some protection against voltage surges and built-up static charges. Using a line conditioner provides further protection.
Yah, you're right. I think a direct lightning hit will overcome any protection devices. I used to be religous about unplugging after my incident. Now I forget and get lazy about it (its a PITA for sure). I will unplug when I know of lightning strikes/bad weather approaching.


I had looked into a "brickwall" surge protector but they aint cheap.
 

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The line conditioner folks swear they will pay for damage done to your coveted electronics, but I have seen scenarios when it was otherwise. A friend of mine that lives close lost multiple components in a storm and was using a Monster unit. They gave him red tape and only compensated him a third of the value of his components. I guess unplugging is safest in a real bad storm.
 

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There are differences between a line conditioner and a surge protector. True there are devices that claim to do both but there are devices like SurgeX or Furman that do surge protection correctly ( very high voltages, say 60,000 joules ) but offer only minimal line conditioning and Exactpower, http://www.exactpower.com that are purely line conditioners ( clean up dirty AC signals and small surges from compressors and refrigerator motors ).


But there is a difference between a power surge, even large ones, and a direct lighting strike. One can be dealt with and the other is a catastrophic event that nothing, in all probability, can deal with. The latter is why we have home owners insurance while the former can be dealt with with a quality surge protector. I would purchase SurgeX to protect my equipment from damage but I would also purchase the Exactpower line conditioner to obtain the improved performance line conditioning offers.


I have always felt that the insurance claims by some manufacturers were actuarial games. They know most people will not put in a claim and then there is the fine print that absolves them form responsibility. Perhaps in a few cases they pay out and their insurance pays- but somehow I do not think that it happens often.


Alan
 

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Alan, what are your feelings on using a UPS AND a line conditioner? I have heard from some a UPS induces noise and some say it filters it.
 

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I am not a fan of UPS except on computers and telephone systems- where their functionality is needed. They do not provide a great deal of line conditioning in my opinion ( yes they claim to ) and they are noisy. They do provide some surge protection for similar reasons that generators do ( a home with a generator installed will kick in when the electric company power is lost. It stays in the circuit until power is restored and so the power surge that comes when power is restored does not reach your equipment because the generator is in the circuit not the the power from the grid. )


I was an audiophile-before I became tired of the egos. I am all for the search for perfect sound but I hated the snobbery. Line conditioning has been touted by audiophiles for a long time but some of the claims may be overstated. I think the exactpower piece works but I would always suggest testing it in your system to see if it works. Surge protection is a necessity-if it is done correctly. To many products are little more than marketing.


I am not a fan of UPS as anything other than an uninterpretable power supply. I would not count on it for surge protection nor line conditioning although it will do a little of both.


Rowland came up with a neat idea yours ago where they had some sort of rechargeable battery that could store tremendous amounts of energy. Connected to this device and you did have a pure source of filtered power. I cannot recollect why it failed as a product. Perhaps it was too expensive.

Maybe someone here can relate the tale.


Alan
 

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Thanks man, that was the most informative rebuttal I have heard on the UPS/Conditioner mystery. I wish you could have added it to prior threads on the subject. It will be asked again.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by audiblesolutions
Rowland came up with a neat idea yours ago where they had some sort of rechargeable battery that could store tremendous amounts of energy. Connected to this device and you did have a pure source of filtered power. I cannot recollect why it failed as a product. Perhaps it was too expensive.

Maybe someone here can relate the tale.


Alan
Mission ( the speaker company) back in the 80's used to make turntables and preamps and poweramps. One of their pre-amplfiers was also battery powered. A few other manufacturers did the same recently. I think one was a outboard DAC. IMHO, these battery devices fail in terms of sales because of PITA factor, after a certain period of time, the battery will have to be replaced. And I can't see this being a reliable hassle free long term solution. A well designed power supply / stage should minimize noise. Unforturnately it is here where most designs scrimp or are comprimised. What parts do the "modders" usually mod first on a component? Yep, you guessed it - the power supplies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by audiblesolutions
There are differences between a line conditioner and a surge protector. True there are devices that claim to do both but there are devices like SurgeX or Furman that do surge protection correctly ( very high voltages, say 60,000 joules ) but offer only minimal line conditioning and Exactpower, http://www.exactpower.com that are purely line conditioners ( clean up dirty AC signals and small surges from compressors and refrigerator motors ).
Have you heard of this product for surge protection? Brickwall .
 

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I do not know this firm but series mode surge protection is what you find with SurgeX and this is the correct way to deal with surges. I will check it further this evening but Brickwall seems like an other candidate for selection if you require surge protection.


Alan
 
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