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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
if so, is there a noticeable difference?

Or do we need to stick up our ear to notice the difference?

If there were a noticeable difference, then I would like a receiver that has AES/EBU output (front left / right)

but I would like the receiver to have the ability to uncouple to function as pre-amp, as the AES/ EBU would be going to power speaker. So far, I can't find any

I did find Rotel Rc-1570 that has a bal. output of AES/ EBU. But their stupid input does NOT support AES / EBU

so I would appreciate any idea on any receiver that can function as a pre-amp, that comes with AES / EBU digital input and bal. output
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
In theory yes. Of course your source needs to have it as well. My DAC has XLR AES/EBU
well my source is either this guy:


http://tascam.com/product/cd-500b/

or this guy

http://denonpro.com/products/view/dn-700c#.VRJOai6Nrs1

the truth is, I am not happy w/ neither one. The 1st one is made in china, and the 2nd one is made in taiwan, and they claim to be professional series

My pre-amp is most likely the Emotica XMC 1

https://emotiva.com/products/pres-and-pros/xmc-1

but if there isn't any noticeable difference btwn. Toslink vs. AES3, then I might as well keep my Pansonic CD player w/ Toslink, and just buy a Rotel RC-1570

http://www.rotel.com/NA/Products/ProductDetails.htm?Id=515&Tab=1&Pic=2

that's why I post that question.

So, how much difference are we talking about?
 

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The advantage of using balanced connections is that the wire is less likely to pick up hum over distance. It is used in the pro audio world because cables can be quite long. It is not generally used in home audio because cables are relatively short and because the system generally wants higher voltages to drive it. It is a rare home audio system that benefits from it. It is also a rare home audio system that has any downside to using it.

It is popular with audiophiles because they think using it will affect the sound in some way. That, of course, is nonsense. Basically it won't help anything and it won't hurt anything in most home audio systems.
 

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The advantage of using balanced connections is that the wire is less likely to pick up hum over distance. It is used in the pro audio world because cables can be quite long. It is not generally used in home audio because cables are relatively short and because the system generally wants higher voltages to drive it. It is a rare home audio system that benefits from it. It is also a rare home audio system that has any downside to using it.

It is popular with audiophiles because they think using it will affect the sound in some way. That, of course, is nonsense. Basically it won't help anything and it won't hurt anything in most home audio systems.
You're clueless.

He's talking about digital audio connection, ie from CD transport to DAC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh70/happyhopping/scan.jpg

I clarify what I try to say from the above diagram.

I was also told from another source that balanced XLR is more quiet, less hum.

Currently, I have my PC sound blaster card connects to the above M-audio M3-8 on the unbalanced connection, on some rare occasion, there is humming sound.

And the distance of the unbalance cable from my sound card to the speaker is only a few feet.

So even at short distance, I would prefer balanced XLR connection for my upcoming setup.

Now, the better question is, I already have a Toslink CD player, if the sound coming out of AES/EBU (top Cd player) is not making a big difference vs. Toslink, then I'll keep my CD player, and use a Emotiva to the M-Audio.

Or I can even save the $ on the Emotiva, and get a Rotel RC-1570 instead. That's why I post the question.
 
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