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I post some shots in the other thread and comments were that it was too bright and needed calibaration. I was going to wait on HD DVE before I calibrated, but the replies I received made me use my AVIA disc. For movies the settings seem fine, but for games the colors aren't as good as they should be. Is the caibration from AVIA outdated totaly? I'll put my flame suit on before I say this but, " I prefer the "vivid" settings for 90% of my games. Tony Hawk P8 is a great example. The blue and red title screen is bland on "custom" settings. On "vivid", the colors seem spot on. I'll post the pics up in the other thread with new settings tonight for comment. Does anyone else prefer a brighter setting then "recomended?"
 

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I've been very pleased with AVIA and the results it's given me. However, there is no right or wrong calibration setting. Just set it to what you're most pleased with and go with that.
 

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The 360 and other HD content is dark when calibrating with avia via the 360. I used the test pattern in NHL 07 to adjust the brightness after I got the colors with avia. I have been happy with this.
 

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That's an inherent problem with calibration and PQ. Sometimes you may prefer a nonstandard picture to the correct way the images are supposed to be displayed. I say go with what makes you happy.
 

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Your games and SD DVD have two different color spaces. If you calibrate for one, the other will be off. If you're going to use the 360 for watching DVDs, your best bet is to save the settings you got with Avia in one of your TV's modes, then do what cdub998 did and calibrate for games using the test pattern in a game and save it to a different mode. Then just switch modes depending on what you're doing.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricM407 /forum/post/0


Your games and SD DVD have two different color spaces. If you calibrate for one, the other will be off. If you're going to use the 360 for watching DVDs, your best bet is to save the settings you got with Avia in one of your TV's modes, then do what cdub998 did and calibrate for games using the test pattern in a game and save it to a different mode. Then just switch modes depending on what you're doing.

Agreed. I have a setting for my Xbox 360 (and things like Pixar movies) and a setting for "film" DVD viewing.
 

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AVIA sucks it is not even 16x9 it is 4x3 and looks like crap but it does work for what it does


I have used it and yes it does halp you calibrate your TV but the fact is most TV's that are 4x3 when it goes to 16x9 mode or a 16x9 tv when it goes from 480i to 480p the settings are different so if you calibrate a display and then watch a DVD it wout be the same since it was calibrated for a 480i signal not anything else


use SQV or DVE DVE has a HD DVD version now and that is what I would use since it is HD
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lynesjc /forum/post/0


I've been very pleased with AVIA and the results it's given me. However, there is no right or wrong calibration setting.

Actually, there is. Its called the CCC (Certified Calibration Controls) program and it was co-developed by the ISF (Imaging Science Foundation). But I don't really worry about my picture being "correct". As long as I am getting the most possible detail out of my display and the colors aren't noticeably off, who cares if the picture is "correct"? I know there are many videophiles out there that want their display perfect, but I don't understand why.
 

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Yeah, I'm aware of that. I just didn't want to bore the OP with 6500k color temp, and ISF standards discussion and that sort of thing.


I guess I should've said while there are objective standards of what your settings should be, what really matters most is what you subjectively like.


Still, your point is a fair one.
 

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Unlike movies, I don't know that video game makers actually use a standard. So, I think it's fair to say that DVDs are mastered based on calibration standards; but I don't know that it's true for video games.


Does anyone know if video game makers use any kind of standard? My intuition has been that they are more market-driven, i.e. choose colors based on what will look cool on most people's tvs. But that's just a guess.


Another way to ask the question: When video game designers are using Maya (or whatever software) to design the appearance of objects in games, are their monitors calibrated? If so, to what standard?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsroberti /forum/post/0


Unlike movies, I don't know that video game makers actually use a standard. So, I think it's fair to say that DVDs are mastered based on calibration standards; but I don't know that it's true for video games.


Does anyone know if video game makers use any kind of standard? My intuition has been that they are more market-driven, i.e. choose colors based on what will look cool on most people's tvs. But that's just a guess.


Another way to ask the question: When video game designers are using Maya (or whatever software) to design the appearance of objects in games, are their monitors calibrated? If so, to what standard?

Most likely D65 standards. I think its a pretty universal standard.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lynesjc /forum/post/0


Yeah, I'm aware of that. I just didn't want to bore the OP with 6500k color temp, and ISF standards discussion and that sort of thing.


I guess I should've said while there are objective standards of what your settings should be, what really matters most is what you subjectively like.


Still, your point is a fair one.

Exactly. There are indeed "correct" settings for your picture, but if it doesn't bother you, who cares if its correct?
 

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it bothers me just knowing that it isnt correct if I know it is wrong then why wouldn't I want to fix it?


and yes they do use monitors that are calibrated to the D65 standard


also they work on a LCD but have a CRT that is used for making color correction I have seen this first hand and prople have told me that is what most places do
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by leftkidney /forum/post/0


it bothers me just knowing that it isnt correct if I know it is wrong then why wouldn't I want to fix it?


and yes they do use monitors that are calibrated to the D65 standard


also they work on a LCD but have a CRT that is used for making color correction I have seen this first hand and prople have told me that is what most places do

Is it right because somone says so, even if your eyes and brain tell you you prefer it wrong?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by assasyn /forum/post/0


Is it right because somone says so, even if your eyes and brain tell you you prefer it wrong?

Maybe eyes and brain say it's wrong because it's actually wrong. If you calibrate with some DVD and like the way your movies look, then switch to a game and don't like the way it looks, it's probably not because you prefer something that's wrong. It IS wrong (technically not calibrated properly), and that's why you don't like it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricM407 /forum/post/0


Your games and SD DVD have two different color spaces. If you calibrate for one, the other will be off. If you're going to use the 360 for watching DVDs, your best bet is to save the settings you got with Avia in one of your TV's modes, then do what cdub998 did and calibrate for games using the test pattern in a game and save it to a different mode. Then just switch modes depending on what you're doing.


Sorry to bump the thread, but I'm in a similar situation. However, my HDTV only allows for one customizable user setting. Since I am using the 360 for games, SD DVDs, and HD DVDs, does that mean I will have to change the settings each time I want to play a game or watch a SD DVD? Or is there sometime I'm missing here, and a way to get around this?
 

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The correctly calibrated set will be closer to what the director of the movie/show intended for you to see. That's really what calibration is all about. When the dvd sends a red pixel, does your display show an orange, yellow, or red one? But I guess it's all relative. We watch based on a true story movies that probably do accurately depict what really happen. You've got to add a little spice otherwise the movie's not gonna sell. I guess you could say the same for an uncalibrated set.
 

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Let me rephrase my question. Since I can only have 1 custom preset for each input on my tv - and because I use the same input for 360 games, sd dvds, and hd dvds - should I just not worry about using Avia, and just use my best judgment for calibrating?


It almost seems like it would be a waste of money to buy Avia, since I'd have to change the settings everytime I wanted to change my activity.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbutle4 /forum/post/0


Let me rephrase my question. Since I can only have 1 custom preset for each input on my tv - and because I use the same input for 360 games, sd dvds, and hd dvds - should I just not worry about using Avia, and just use my best judgment for calibrating?

I doubt AVIA will be much help to you for this.
 
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