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Just taking tower speakers into account for this question, I've seen some models with PCB boards for the XO's up to a foot in length jam-packed with various caps, coils, etc.. and I've seen similar speakers with comparatively weenie looking XO's barely taking up a fist-sized board directly behind the binding post plate.


Is bigger usually better for a crossover? Larger coils, more/larger caps, etc.. or can a more compact design be just as good? Maybe simpler and smaller can sometimes be better?


It just makes me wonder when I look inside and see some of these things, and the way they're done (even for similar speaker layouts) can be so radically different.


Just curious..
 

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Quote:
Is bigger usually better for a crossover?

Yes, as most manufacturers wouldn't spend the extra money if it didn't change things - and one would assume in most cases the change is for the better.

Quote:
or can a more compact design be just as good?

Yes it can. It all depends on the goal of the manufacturer, and the implementation of the crossover.

Quote:
Maybe simpler and smaller can sometimes be better?

As above, yes some times it is. I know a certain speaker manufacturers that designed 5 way floor standing speakers without any crossover.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gooki /forum/post/16924411


As above, yes some times it is. I know a certain speaker manufacturers that designed 5 way floor standing speakers without any crossover.

But were they any good?
 

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A crossover is there to filter bandwidth to the appropriate driver, allow for things like BSC and tame inheirant driver flaws like breakup. An overly complex crossover can mean that a manufacturer compromised the overall design in order to use off the shelf drivers which are not ideally suited for the job at hand. It also can mean you have a 3+ way design. It can also mean they really wanted a very specific output and they're willing to shell out the extra cost to get it.


Honestly its more usefull to look at what kind of components they've used. If the network is comprised of electrolytic caps and sandstone resistors theres a chance it was cheaped out on. Then again, everything has its uses.



Clear as mud yet?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LHD21 /forum/post/16935954


Honestly its more usefull to look at what kind of components they've used. If the network is comprised of electrolytic caps and sandstone resistors theres a chance it was cheaped out on.

If you see an electrolytic cap in a crossover; even for bypass; that is a crappy crossover. Your observations are correct, though.


A simple 2nd order crossover using big chokes and caps (Solen, etc.) isn't complex but it can work very well, providing the drivers are really uniform. Sometimes a crossover tries to do too much, with extra Klingons to sit on a driver that's too sensitive, to flatten an ugly out-of-band peak, or to try to fashion the response curve into something "better." What happens quite often in a complex crossover is the speaker sensitivity plummets (no good), the load becomes too reactive or capacitive with a goofy phase angle, and it can cause an amplifier to have a coronary.


Cliff's notes...


Pick really good and APPROPRIATE drivers for the application.


Keep the crossover network simple, Stoopid.


Use first-rate crossover components.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli /forum/post/16936402


If you see an electrolytic cap in a crossover; even for bypass; that is a crappy crossover. Your observations are correct, though.


Cliff's notes...


Pick really good and APPROPRIATE drivers for the application.


Keep the crossover network simple, Stoopid.


Use first-rate crossover components.

Yep, Solen poly caps, air core coils, good resistors, 9v alkaline battery is all you need to build a "Class A" crossover.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli /forum/post/16936402


the load becomes too reactive or capacitive with a goofy phase angle,

Did you mean "inductive or capacitive?"... both of which are reactive?
 

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