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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read this in response to a video game question about burn in on a rear projection set. It sounds a little off. comments?


"Well for the first question, it will only burn into the TV if you have a HDTV....or a certain model called "Rear Projection CRT". They have the power to actually burn an image onto the plastic which the images is projected on. The "Rear Projection DLP" wont burn in any images

(hopefully) dues to teh fact that they mainly use plasma as a display layering.


But understand, a normal porjection tv that uses large cathode tubes to project the image on a big screen wont burn anything. But if you have one of those High Priced R.P.CRT tvs....then i must say, if you have that type of money, then im sure you can afford another one"
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by TomM
"burn an image onto the plastic which the images is projected on."
you've got to be kidding me.... cancel your subscription to this magazine. burn in on RPTV's is where the you get uneven phosphor burn in on the actual CRT's. do a search if you want to learn more about it.
 

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First of all here's my definition of 'burn-in'. Burn in is a visible difference in appearence between areas of the display which have been used more to display picture compared to areas which have been used less. Areas of statis display such as instrument dials on games, crawlers on news channels and logo bugs can cause this difference in aging of the display device.


I know that any CRT based display can do it, my wife 'branded' one of the shopping network screen formats on a direct view and we burned the windows tool bar onto an LCD monitor at work during software development and testing.


What's required is to minimize the difference in this aging process across the screen by varying content and format to use all of the screen as uniformly as possible. I don't have any experience with DLP but basicly if the output technology has a visible aging effect it could be 'burned-in'.


Hope this helps.


TerryB
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
OK, thanks, I thought as much. It wasn't a magazine, but an Xbox forum. Also,


"The "Rear Projection DLP" wont burn in any images (hopefully) dues to teh fact that they mainly use plasma as a display layering."


this doesn't sound right either. I thought DLP used mirrors on a microchip along with a spinning color wheel, not Plasma. I would usually not waste my time, but I don't like to see any more mis-information than there already is regarding HD sets.


Thanks again
 

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I used to worry about burn-in on my HDTV after watching so many 2.35:1 movies on DVD... but you know what? I have yet to see any burn.


Of course, it might be because my set is ISF'd and thus not spitting thousands of degrees of WHITE out onto the screen as it was when it was shipped from the factory.


Go figure.


-- Robert
 

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When i saw this subject I thought it was about the other type of burn in, where you slightly age the components in order to get a more acurate adjustment. For example when you get a new tv and you do a quick adjustment then let it run for 150 hours then do the intense job.
 

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As noted above, a DLP uses no phosphors (just mirrors and a wheel) and can't be burned.


How about a 3 panel LCD? Is it possible to burn that?
 

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LCDs are not susceptible to burn in. They can experience a burn-in like effect if a static image is kept on for hours. However, shutting off the display for a bit makes the effect complete reverse itself. Ergo, no burn in.


Mark
 
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