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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure if this is the right area and if it is not...please move or delete my post.


Im pretty new to HDTV tv and or viewing HD...i went from a 27 Inch Magnavox that was on its last leg (NEVER had a problem with it) to a 52 Inch Sharp Aquos HDTV...I really enjoy the HD part of viewing...however, when i view 720 format or 1080I or 1080P I see NO difference between them...NONE...ZIP...


Is this 1080I or 1080P over rated? i know i wear bi-focals and they were tuned up for the new millenium....someone enlighten me...thank you....just clarify it...I love it ALLLLLLL...


Gilbert
 

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If the distance to the dispay is to far away i relation to the displays size. The improvment of going from 720P to 1080P isnt very large.


Also what title you watching also impacts.
 

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Source has some to do with it too. There is great 720p and bad 1080p.


Also, I am amazed at the people who tell me that NFL games on ESPN (compressed 720p) look better than Blu-ray and HD DVD. They like the bright colors I guess.


And finally, people here like to freeze frames and stand a coupe feet away from their 1080p sets. Then they obsess about any little motion artifact that they see.
Its a guy thing, you know "mine's bigger than yours (TV and resolution)".
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by namrats /forum/post/14266965


a 52 Inch Sharp Aquos HDTV...I really enjoy the HD part of viewing...however, when i view 720 format or 1080I or 1080P I see NO difference between them...NONE...ZIP...

You did not state what model of Sharp was purchased. Many of these sets have 1400 or less horizontal pixel elements therefore you would probably see no difference between 1280 and 1920 sources.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Everdog /forum/post/14268069


Source has some to do with it too. There is great 720p and bad 1080p.


Also, I am amazed at the people who tell me that NFL games on ESPN (compressed 720p) look better than Blu-ray and HD DVD.

I'm not. Movies are probably the worst format to present HD- there are too many variables from movie to movie, and the higher framerate of live sports makes HD look more lifelike than the 24fps of films.


I'm not saying that I agree that ESPNHD looks better than HDM, but I can understand why someone would think that.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Everdog /forum/post/14268069


Source has some to do with it too. There is great 720p and bad 1080p.


Also, I am amazed at the people who tell me that NFL games on ESPN (compressed 720p) look better than Blu-ray and HD DVD. They like the bright colors I guess.


And finally, people here like to freeze frames and stand a coupe feet away from their 1080p sets. Then they obsess about any little motion artifact that they see.
Its a guy thing, you know "mine's bigger than yours (TV and resolution)".


Fox HD (720p) NFL games look awful. I think the 1080i NBC and CBS look better, at least when they're not going soft or blocking up.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian81 /forum/post/14269156


Fox HD (720p) NFL games look awful. I think the 1080i NBC and CBS look better, at least when they're not going soft or blocking up.

I agree, and cable companies can make them look even worse by compressing the signal even more.


Now something like Sunrise Earth can look amazing. Since there is little movement, the 1080i signal looks as good as 1080p.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My Sharp is a costco model LC C5262U ....my media room (wife calls it that) is 20X20 and we sit about 12-15 from it...and we usually try to fill the screen...i feel "cheated" if i dont fill out ALL of the 52inches of that beautiful screen...I love watching the golf and Nascar stuff (on occasion)...i dare say that even THE NEWS looks great....

Gilbert
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by namrats /forum/post/14269878


My Sharp is a costco model LC C5262U ....my media room (wife calls it that) is 20X20 and we sit about 12-15 from it...and we usually try to fill the screen...i feel "cheated" if i dont fill out ALL of the 52inches of that beautiful screen...I love watching the golf and Nascar stuff (on occasion)...i dare say that even THE NEWS looks great....

Gilbert

At 12+ feet you're going to have a hard time seeing a difference with a 52" screen.


~9 feet or less is likely where you'll start noticing I would think (depending on your eyesight w/ glasses on).


Also, this is assuming the content you are playing is actually good enough to show a difference. However, there is definitely a difference when the planets align and you have it all set up -- I wouldn't recommend anything but 1080p for TVs over 40", below that it depends... and Projectors are 1080p or bust!


Regardless, it should be apparent that it's HD rather than SD, even at 15'.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by namrats /forum/post/14266965


Not sure if this is the right area and if it is not...please move or delete my post.


Im pretty new to HDTV tv and or viewing HD...i went from a 27 Inch Magnavox that was on its last leg (NEVER had a problem with it) to a 52 Inch Sharp Aquos HDTV...I really enjoy the HD part of viewing...however, when i view 720 format or 1080I or 1080P I see NO difference between them...NONE...ZIP...


Is this 1080I or 1080P over rated? i know i wear bi-focals and they were tuned up for the new millenium....someone enlighten me...thank you....just clarify it...I love it ALLLLLLL...


Gilbert

Hi and welcome to AVS.



What source of HD are you using? Cable/Sat/Telco/OTA?


What is the make and model number for the HD "box" you are using to feed your HDTV?
 

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I just went from a Sony 50" LCD RPTV (KDF50E2000) which has a native resolution of 720 p to a 46" Sony LCD (KDL46S4100) that can go up to 1080p.


It was mostly because I began to notice that Blu-ray disc titles I have always seem to look so much better on displays in stores.


I know part of it was due to the silk screen effect of the 720p Sony. The screen always looked "dirty" and that may have been a factor. We sit about 8 feet from the screen in the living room. The 1080p Sony really does produce a much better result.


Contrast that to the 42" LG LCD I have in the bedroom which is a 720p. Because we sit about 12 feet from that, I'm hard pressed to call it anything but really sharp.


All I'm doing is just confirming my real world experience with what others have posted. A smaller 720p screen size from a greater distance can look just as good as a larger screen size 1080p from a closer distance.


By the numbers on paper, a 1080p should theoretically beat a 720p---but it doesn't always work out that way.
 

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Sitting too far away from your HDTV is the equivalent of squinting. You're not seeing everything that's there to be seen.
 

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Depends on what you're comparing between 720p and 1080i/p. Posts in the HD programming forum (and others) have been describing 1080i's greater detail from the earliest days of HD. A 1080p Aquos should reveal differences but a 1024X768 display isn't suitable for accurate comparisons--just as sitting too far away isn't.


Live sports often offers good 720p/1080i comparisons. Contrast the faces and other details in crowds or the lettering in signs; 1080i, with twice the format resolution of 720p, generally delivers more details. But in recent years 720p has become crisper because 1080i/p cameras, with oversampling/downconversion, boost the final effective resolution of 720p sources. 720p cameras, still used, deliver an often obvious reduced effective resolution.


Filtering of 1080i/p images, beyond that required for the limiting resolution (see link), reduces 1080i/p live/recorded detail. Oversampling/downconversion for 1080i/p should boost its limiting/effective resolution as well, although live OTA HD (MPEG-2 in the U.S.) likely couldn't handle such boosted detail coupled with motion.


Movies, because they're often deliberately filtered within cameras, aren't the best sources for 720p/1080i/p resolution comparisons. An earlier analysis of telecined film showed that 800--1100 lines per HD picture width maximum horizontal resolution was typical. Blu-ray or earlier HD discs based on downconverted 4k scans of film used for digital intermediate production, or from ~3k/4k digital-cinema cameras, should provide crisper images than older telecines, although similar spectrum analysis is needed for confirmation. But planned camera filtering would negate such oversampling/downconversion for boosted effective resolution. For example, while the TNT presentation of the CIA-history miniseries, "The Company," last year was shot with the ~3k German Arri digital camera, the director/DP filtered down images to give them an older 'historical' look. -- John
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart /forum/post/14270619


Hi and welcome to AVS.



What source of HD are you using? Cable/Sat/Telco/OTA?


What is the make and model number for the HD "box" you are using to feed your HDTV?


Hello Lee Stewart:

When i got the new TV I up graded from my 8yr old Direct Tv box to a NEW / latest version that picks up HD(TIVO free)....I am using Direct TV to feed the new tv...i have not upgraded my Home Theater receiver yet (to be ONKYO sr805)...strangely enough volume of the sound from the tv is not the same on all the channels...yes i am a little hard of hearing(too much war and rock and roll).


Gilbert
 

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namrats,

Suspect, if you view DirecTV's continuing HDLite channels, downconverted to 1280X1080 from 1920X1080, you wouldn't see much difference with 1280X720p HD channels. But the newer MPEG4-delivered 1080 channels, without downconversion, should look crisper than 720p. -- John
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason /forum/post/14273937


namrats,

Suspect, if you view DirecTV's continuing HDLite channels, downconverted to 1280X1080 from 1920X1080, you wouldn't see much difference with 1280X720p HD channels. But the newer MPEG4-delivered 1080 channels, without downconversion, should look crisper than 720p. -- John

Are you saying that in some cases i could hear louder channels based on the delivery used?

Gilbert
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart /forum/post/14270619


Hi and welcome to AVS.



What source of HD are you using? Cable/Sat/Telco/OTA?


What is the make and model number for the HD "box" you are using to feed your HDTV?

i looked it up and the model number is H20...probably a generic model for all Direct Tv products...not sure who made it for them...ill check the back of it later.


Gilbert
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by namrats /forum/post/14274124


Are you saying that in some cases i could hear louder channels based on the delivery used?

Gilbert

That is the case even without different delivery mechanisms. While there are standards for the level of sound transmitted, there are ways to make something sound louder without the level being different. This is for example, is deployed in commercials to get your interest.


Some settop boxes or TVs may have a setting to equalize ("normalize") the levels. I know our Comcast box does. So you may want to look for that to mitigate this issue to some extent.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian81 /forum/post/14269156


Fox HD (720p) NFL games look awful. I think the 1080i NBC and CBS look better, at least when they're not going soft or blocking up.

Say that in the HDTV programming section. They will laugh you off the forum. NBC looks awful. I have yet to see a game without macroblocking or other visible artifacting. It's a common complaint. I bet your Fox game was a widescreen SD. Most of their 720p games don't look too bad at all.


OP, 52" is a bit small to tell the difference between 1080i/p and 720p unless you are sitting within a few (like 2!) feet of the display. The guys with larger screens will tell you that.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by allargon /forum/post/14274913



OP, 52" is a bit small to tell the difference between 1080i/p and 720p unless you are sitting within a few (like 2!) feet of the display. The guys with larger screens will tell you that.

LOL LOL


Remember 10 years ago, when every one scrutinizing 480i DVDs on their 32" and 36" CRT TVs like their Sony Trinitrons and Mitsubishis.


That was cutting edge.


And now 52" Displays are too small to tell the difference on a resolution difference of 360 lines?
 
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