AVS Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If all I want to do is send a composite video signal from one source to four locations can I use RG-6 and an f-type to RCA coupler on the cable terminations?


If I want to use S-video instead of composite is it as inexpensive?


I have one S-video source and want it in four locations. How do I terminate the cable? Can I use RG-6?


Should I just stick with composite?


Who makes a distribution amplifier just for composite video and no audio?



I am basically trying to distribute the video output of the record zone on my Lexicon MC-12 to 4 rooms? I would rather use S-video, but if it is cheaper and easier I will use composite.


At my home I have DirecTV, Cable, and (the third source I am trying to distribute). I plan on using a DirecTV receiver in 2-3 rooms, cableTV via the televisions tuner, and I would like to be able to view the record output of the Lexicon in all of the rooms. Right now cable and DirecTV is just distributed via a basic splitter outside the house. I don't know if I could benefit from one of those channelmaster modulator things as I don't know how they work. Please help me with understanding the most cost-effective and user-friendly solution.



Thanks,


Anthony
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
Anthony,


I am doing basically the same thing you want to accomplish. I use a Channel Plus model 3025 "all-in-one" multi-room video distribution system to accomplish this. It allows you to distribute 2 composite video sources (plus audio if desired) plus a CATV or antenna signal to 5 locations. It also allows for remote control from all 5 locations (with optional IR receivers). I have a Directv receiver on one input, the "room 2 out" of my Onkyo receiver on the other input and CATV on the RF input. I modulate the 2 inputs to channel 84 and 86. So from any of the 5 TV locations in my house I can watch (and remote control) CATV, Directv, or any source connected to my Onkyo receiver (DVD, VHS, etc).


I recommend using direct s-video (or composite) connections for for large TVs where you can see the difference. For most smaller TVs (32" or under) the modulated channels looks as good as my cable and almost as good as Directv. Several vendors sell the Channel Plus 3025 for less than $130. For the money there is no better solution. Let me know if you have any specific questions. Good luck.


Jay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok, so when you tune to ch. 84 you receive the output of the direcTV receiver (right?), and when you tune to 86 you get the output of the Onkyo (right???). Now I assume that when you use IR to change the DirecTV channel it changes the image in all 5 rooms as well as the source. In other words if you wanted a separate direcTV receiver you run a separate cable from the Satelite?


For the Onkyo are you just running a video signal and the audio is distributed another way???





Thanks, ARe you using RG-6 for this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
I think you've got a good handle on how it works. The answer to your questions are all yes. For the Onkyo I am using audio and video. In fact I have a second Directv stb (stb #2) connected to my Onkyo and the 2nd room out selector is normally set to stb #2. So channel 84 is stb #1 and channel 86 is (usually) stb #2. The distance from my modulator to stb #1 is only about 6' so I use normal AV cables. The distance from the modulator to my Onkyo is about 35' and I use RG-6 with F to RCA adapters. Since the modulator is mono you only need to run 2 cables (1 audio, 1 video).


The stb's I am using to distribute video are UltimateTV boxes. These work very well for this because they have 3 video outputs (1 s-video, 2 composite) and 3 audio outputs (2 analog, 1 digital) that are all active at the same time. This allows me to directly connect 2 TVs and feed the modulator at the same time without having to use ditribution amplifiers. In my HT room I am able to watch either stb on my RPTV using a direct connection (no modulator). Let me know if you have any more questions.


Jay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
You will get a better picture if you go the S-Video route, but it is slightly more expensive.


S-Video requires 2 pairs of conductors whereas composite video requres a single pair.


So for S-Video you need to run either 2 strands of RG6, or a single strand of S-Video cable (available at better electronics stores) or for short runs just about any type of shielded 4 conductor wire.


There are S-video distribution amplifiers you can find on-line that work the same way as the more commonly found composite video distribution amplifiers, but they are more expensive.


The hardest thing about S-video is building the connectors - I found it was hard to find do-it-yourself S-video connectors. A useful product I found was Leviton S-Video keystone jacks - they make an S-video jack that you can plug into a standard Leviton structure media wall plate.


In my installation I was selective. I am slinging composite video all over the place in my house, but between key sources that I want to be higher quality that composite (Between my HTPC and my HDTV for instance) I went with S-Video.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,991 Posts
I concur with Dan, that s-video terminations are a pain with RG6. But to make it simpler, you can use the F-Type to RCA plugs, and then buy one of the two RCA to s-video adapters. I unfortunately don't have the direct link, but I recall they aren't inexpensive. About $40 I believe.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top