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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I heard that the signal coming from your computer has a role to play in overall audio quality and so most people buy a DAC in conjunction with an amp however, my computer is pretty high end and has a Gigabyte 990FXA-UD3 Mobo Is it good enough to just have a RCA splitter? Or do I need a DCA?
 

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Yes, people sometimes buy standalone DACs, but not for the reasons you are apparently thinking. The single biggest source of electromagnetic interference inside a modern computer is going to be the GPU. If you use the HDMI audio output from the GPU, it's not affected. If on the other hand you use a dedicated sound card or onboard audio and try to use the analog output, you'll probably hear a high pitch whining on the output whenever your GPU kicks into full.

There are specialty motherboards (in the event that you are going to use on-board audio) or dedicated sound cards that offer significant shielding, but it doesn't look like your motherboard's on-board audio is one of them.

This (http://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards/RAMPAGE_V_EXTREME/specifications/) is an example of a motherboard with dedicated shielding on the DAC (though it's for the wrong processor).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, people sometimes buy standalone DACs, but not for the reasons you are apparently thinking. The single biggest source of electromagnetic interference inside a modern computer is going to be the GPU. If you use the HDMI audio output from the GPU, it's not affected. If on the other hand you use a dedicated sound card or onboard audio and try to use the analog output, you'll probably hear a high pitch whining on the output whenever your GPU kicks into full.

There are specialty motherboards (in the event that you are going to use on-board audio) or dedicated sound cards that offer significant shielding, but it doesn't look like your motherboard's on-board audio is one of them.

This (http://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards/RAMPAGE_V_EXTREME/specifications/) is an example of a motherboard with dedicated shielding on the DAC (though it's for the wrong processor).
Hearing your explanation makes me think that your scenario is only apparent in cases when the Video and Audio both come from the Motherboard. I have a dedicated graphics card (GTX 970) and you actually have to try to push it to full load so I'm not sure if I would encounter the same problems as one who uses onboard video/low end GPU.

My audio connections go to 5.1 speaker recievers from my motherboard while my video connection goes to the TV from my GTX 970 using a DVI-VGA adapter.
 

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It looks like that MB has a optical output. That's a very good way to get "clean" sound to your receiver if it has a optical input.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It looks like that MB has a optical output. That's a very good way to get "clean" sound to your receiver if it has a optical input.
Not a reciever............an amp and a 2.1 setup.
 

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If you don't notice any issues then stick with what you've got.

That said, in my experience motherboard sound often has poor isolation from noise in the rest of the system and you can do significantly better for not a lot of money. You don't need an esoteric DAC, just a decent USB soundcard from a reputable manufacturer like Asus (Xonar), M-Audio, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you don't notice any issues then stick with what you've got.

That said, in my experience motherboard sound often has poor isolation from noise in the rest of the system and you can do significantly better for not a lot of money. You don't need an esoteric DAC, just a decent USB soundcard from a reputable manufacturer like Asus (Xonar), M-Audio, etc.
I see, any recommendations?
 
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