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I just watch cable TV via a single RCA "composite" connection. I think you need a DVDO or Quadscan to feed your projector a progressive signal via 15-pin VGA cord to see any improvement, but if not I'd like to hear it.


TV via composite is very watchable for me, but of course no where nearly as nice as prog DVD via component. Your cable signal may not be as strong as mine either so maybe your picture is worse.


Kurt


Sanyo XW-15
 

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I have never seen any cable/satellite source (that isn't high def) use component out. Generally, there isn't that much of an improvement over S-video for such a lower quality signal. DVD's often use NTSC component since they are a better source to begin with and it is a more noticeable difference.


Thanks!
 

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Well, there is nothing that says your satellite device CAN'T have a component out; however, you'll probably ony find those types of connections on an HD receiver.


Even at that, your source image (NTSC) is still going to be poor. Worse yet, the satellite's compression of the already low-res signal, is going to produce motion artifacts that are VERY noticeable, especially when you blow it up to screen size.


Basically, what you need is a scaler that can intelligently take the NTSC image and fill-in all the gaps before sending it to your projector.


Other suggestions:

If your local TV station is broadcasting the game, get your signal off the air. It will most likely look better than the Local-in-Local retransmission from your Satellite.


If your local TV station is broadcasting the game AND they also have a digital channel, the clarity will DEFINITELY be better than the satellite. However, you will need an HD set top box with OTA (Over The Air) capability.


If you are like me, and are trying to watch NFL Sunday Ticket on your projector, there is very little you can do to improve the image without the external scaler. Even then, you may not be convinced it is worth the investment.
 

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Analog NTSC broadcasts use composite video to modulate the RF carrier when broadcasting - it doesn't get any better than composite for broadcast. However, when comparing S-video and composite video outputs from my cable box, I have noticed that those cable stations that never were broadcast over the air (FOX News and the like) do look better over S-video. I'm guessing the reason for this is the cable signal doesn't constrain the video bandwidth of such direct satellite signals as much as the RF broadcast of OTA station signals does.


The only interlaced component sources I've ever seen are from DVD players, anyway.


Gary
 

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If you have a PC available for use, the best thing to do is to get a video capture card that is compatible with dScaler, and scale the NTSC with your computer. See the HTPC forum for more details. dScaler is a freeware software program that beats everything for scaling NTSC but is only capatible with a specific chip that is used in many capture cards. You can get a video capture card for $49 and a Radeon video card for about $79, and with any 500 MHz computer should be good to go.
 
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