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So I'm curious if this "problem" is a myth or not, because I don't see this effect AT ALL on my new LED LCD TV... But this was a key benefit that the saleaman explained to a buddy of mine which ultimately convinced him to buy a Plasma TV over LCD... Because, according to him, Plasmas do not "suffer" from this effect (that I haven't seen)


Pixellation effect...

Ok, so we've all see compressed video where the details a blurred by rectangular pixels (just check out youtube
)... and this salesguy told my buddy that Plasma TV "never" have this problem... and ALL LCD Technology has this problem... Smoke on a video game, or on an older movie will look "pixellated"... So that it looks like there are several different layers of shading in the smoke (same problem in dark scenes). I can account for this problem on my "older" LCD TV upstairs in the bedroom... But I do not see this effect AT ALL on my new LCD TV...


Also, other than limitations of colors, my understanding is that the SOURCE video is a bigger contributor to this than the display. For example, when you watch a TV show and it's nice and clear at the 1080i signal from your provider, but then the scene fades away, you can see those "blocky pixels" as the screen fades. This exists on Plasmas and LCDs to the same level which suggests the source video compression is the problem.


For further comparison... I noticed the effect to be worse on a Samsung Plasma TV when compared to a Vizio LCD TV right next to it.... They were both similar sizes, connected via HDMI and receiving the same video signal at the store... The scene was a man and woman, in a kitchen and you could see the "rectangular pixellation" on the peoples skin texture, on their clothing as the lighting changed from a well lit area of color to a darker area of the same color. Both TVs had the pixellation effect, but it was worse on the Plasma...


I'm not doubting that the settings of the Plasma were a little off and could have been calibrated to releive the effect and be equivilent to the signal displayed by the LCD...


My question here is more about wether or not this is really a problem aymore with the newer LCD TV that are avialable now??? I provided the examples above as evidence that this is more likely an effect of the video source compression rather than a limitation of current technology.


Was the sales guy full of crap... becase I do not see this effect at all on my TV.. I play video games and watch movies and TV... the only time I see the pixellation effect is from sources of high video compression (satellite TV, DVD upconversion...), but I NEVER see it in a game or on BluRay...
 

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When you talk about smoke in a video game, i wonder if you mean dithering, which i haven't seen in a long time. For edges, even if you had it set at 1080p, there would still be jagged edges.
 

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It's source related. Plasmas generally have a "softer" picture which tends to disguise it.

Plasmas also have a more visible panel pixel structure which can cause a similar effect if the sharpness is turned up too far, more noticeable on the 720 models than on 1080 sets.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedJamaX /forum/post/20904812


So I'm curious if this "problem" is a myth or not, because I don't see this effect AT ALL on my new LED LCD TV... But this was a key benefit that the saleaman explained to a buddy of mine which ultimately convinced him to buy a Plasma TV over LCD... Because, according to him, Plasmas do not "suffer" from this effect (that I haven't seen)


Pixellation effect...

Ok, so we've all see compressed video where the details a blurred by rectangular pixels (just check out youtube
)... and this salesguy told my buddy that Plasma TV "never" have this problem... and ALL LCD Technology has this problem... Smoke on a video game, or on an older movie will look "pixellated"... So that it looks like there are several different layers of shading in the smoke (same problem in dark scenes). I can account for this problem on my "older" LCD TV upstairs in the bedroom... But I do not see this effect AT ALL on my new LCD TV...


Also, other than limitations of colors, my understanding is that the SOURCE video is a bigger contributor to this than the display. For example, when you watch a TV show and it's nice and clear at the 1080i signal from your provider, but then the scene fades away, you can see those "blocky pixels" as the screen fades. This exists on Plasmas and LCDs to the same level which suggests the source video compression is the problem.


For further comparison... I noticed the effect to be worse on a Samsung Plasma TV when compared to a Vizio LCD TV right next to it.... They were both similar sizes, connected via HDMI and receiving the same video signal at the store... The scene was a man and woman, in a kitchen and you could see the "rectangular pixellation" on the peoples skin texture, on their clothing as the lighting changed from a well lit area of color to a darker area of the same color. Both TVs had the pixellation effect, but it was worse on the Plasma...


I'm not doubting that the settings of the Plasma were a little off and could have been calibrated to releive the effect and be equivilent to the signal displayed by the LCD...


My question here is more about wether or not this is really a problem aymore with the newer LCD TV that are avialable now??? I provided the examples above as evidence that this is more likely an effect of the video source compression rather than a limitation of current technology.


Was the sales guy full of crap... becase I do not see this effect at all on my TV.. I play video games and watch movies and TV... the only time I see the pixellation effect is from sources of high video compression (satellite TV, DVD upconversion...), but I NEVER see it in a game or on BluRay...


I Definitely see this in my UN60D7000. Especially on cable movies that have gray scenes. I dont see that on my plasma. There is no problem if the source is 1080p, but the rectangular pixellation is there and clearly visible . I was watching "Chicago" the other day on cable and it was very very apparent.
 
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