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I have my PC that records TV in a bedroom. I watch recordings on my 360 in the living room and other bedroom (2 extenders...usually only 1 is used at any time).


I have 1 wireless router (Buffalo HP-G54) and one router connected via WDS bridging to a Buffalo G125. This is the only wifi connection, and both routers support "125 burst" mode.


Normally this works fine, but max bandwidth is about 18Mbps, which is *barely* enough for HD recordings. It works, but there is often latency with control input between the 360 and PC when starting the extender (it goes away, but only after about 1-3 minutes of transfers at ~80Kbps). TV usually works fine, but there are dropouts in bandwith from time to time down to 8Mbps or so (and pixellation or pauses) along with occasional disconnects.


I see the newer Powerline kits display >100Mbps speeds now...is this real? I've thought of going with "N" wireless, but from what I hear this isn't optimal either (and 2 N routers would be expensive). I'm basically ready to just get a 50' ethernet cord and live with it. Do you think the Powerline option is worth it?
 

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I find that it works great, the only thing is that with wireless N I'm not sure they are necessary anymore. The adapter stay warm all the time so I think they are always drawing quite a bit of power.
 

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There are a lot of factors that will affect the performance of Powerline, such as wire distance between point A to point B, crossing over CB, etc... I had mixed results with poewrline in my house and would get mixed results depending on what outlets I plugged the powerline kit in. I ended up scrapping and just running Cat6. An alternative that seems to not suffer from some of the limitations of powerline would be MoCA
 

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I've been using powerline networking for a couple of machines for several years at home. The general experience has been good and has gotten better over time. Once established it is very reliable.


Here's what I've said on our forum:
http://yabb.jriver.com/interact/index.php?topic=52632.0


I think industry powerline networking may be a sleeping giant.
 

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I've been using powerline for my HDHomeRun to HTPC connection. I'm able to record 2 HD streams ~ 40Mbps at the same time without any real issues.


All in all it works decently, but there are a few things to note:


1: Depends on the quality and routing of your electric wires: As a previous poster mentioned, it depends on your electrical wiring and how it's connected. Depending on how your wires are routed, it may work great, poorly, or not at all if the outlets aren't on the same "circuit", not sure if that's the right term.


2: Noise is not a friend: If you have many things plugged into the same circuit and those things introduce noise to the electrical line, your performance will suffer. I plugged in a cell phone wall wart on a plug on the other side of the room and my network signal became unusable, my power plug modules have a flashing light, green/yellow/red to let you know. I didn't realized this was the problem since it was plugged in across the room, but once I unplugged it, everything worked fine. I did discover that if you a use decent powerstrip or UPS it can reduce or remove the noise from things like the wall warts. I plugged the cellphone charger in a powerstrip and that has cleared up that particular issue. Other things like Fridge and Microwave may be a greater challenge if they are introducing noise.


3: No X-10: This is a system that relies on the noise present in your powerline, if you use powerline networking this won't work.


4: Surge suppression issue: This to me is a pretty big deal. I live in TX where a thunderstorm isn't uncommon. If a surge occurs these guys are toast since they are plugged directly into the power socket, you can't use a surge protector in conjunction with these devices.


If I could, I'd run cat 6, but that presents issues of it's own.


Mike
 

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It tends to be very hit or miss. Some people have good results. Some people have terrible results. I'd strongly recommend going with MoCA (ethernet over coax). From postings I've seen here and in the Tivo groups, results are almost universally good. I reliably get 50-80 megabits/s real world transfer rates, with no dropouts or lost connections.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fyodor /forum/post/17038324


It tends to be very hit or miss. Some people have good results. Some people have terrible results. I'd strongly recommend going with MoCA (ethernet over coax). From postings I've seen here and in the Tivo groups, results are almost universally good. I reliably get 50-80 megabits/s real world transfer rates, with no dropouts or lost connections.

I would definitely recommend that if you get powerline the first thing you do is run it through the ringer in your house so if it doesn't meet your needs you can return it for a refund. I really like what I am hearing about MoCA, hopefully we will start seeing MoCA switches soon.
 

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I was surprised to see all the recommendations in this thread. In my experiences (I've never done it, but I know others who have), powerline networking doesn't really cut it.


I hope if you decide to go through with it, that you have better luck! For some, it may be the only option.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dbone1026 /forum/post/17038350


I would definitely recommend that if you get powerline the first thing you do is run it through the ringer in your house so if it doesn't meet your needs you can return it for a refund. I really like what I am hearing about MoCA, hopefully we will start seeing MoCA switches soon.

Actually, if you're comfortable with a little basic router configuration, you can purchase an Actiontec/fios router on ebay for 30-35 bucks and turn it into a MoCA bridge/switch. I have two working as bridges.

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1145636
 

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Just catching up on some reading after vacation and came across this post. Set up a buddy with powerline, which I've had good luck with, but it kept hiccuping in his house.


Went with MoCA ( http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833122243 ) and it's working great! Early adoption and pretty idiot proof...even I got it running no prob.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jriver /forum/post/17038158


I've been using powerline networking for a couple of machines for several years at home. The general experience has been good and has gotten better over time. Once established it is very reliable.


Here's what I've said on our forum:
http://yabb.jriver.com/interact/index.php?topic=52632.0


I think industry powerline networking may be a sleeping giant.

Yup, my experience is that it seems just as fast as being wired direct to your router. For some reason it seems to be a pretty unpopular solution.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffkro /forum/post/17068242


Yup, my experience is that it seems just as fast as being wired direct to your router. For some reason it seems to be a pretty unpopular solution.

A lot of us geeks & nerds have beaucoup surge suppressors, which treat all powerline signals as Noise and try to take them to ground. So these things just plain don't work.


In commercial buildings they don't typically work for a different reason: too much noise on the powerlines, especially fluorescent light fixtures.


I wish they'd work at my house, but they absolutely do not.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laserfan /forum/post/17069038


A lot of us geeks & nerds have beaucoup surge suppressors, which treat all powerline signals as Noise and try to take them to ground. So these things just plain don't work.


In commercial buildings they don't typically work for a different reason: too much noise on the powerlines, especially fluorescent light fixtures.


I wish they'd work at my house, but they absolutely do not.

Another benefit of MoCA over powerline. We had our basement finished and since the wiring was on a different CB powerline did not work for the main house to the basement. With MoCA this would not be an issue since the coax throughout the house all comes from the same source.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dbone1026 /forum/post/17069357


Another benefit of MoCA over powerline. We had our basement finished and since the wiring was on a different CB powerline did not work for the main house to the basement. With MoCA this would not be an issue since the coax throughout the house all comes from the same source.

Why didn't you run cat 5 while the basement was being refinished. Nothing is as good as having a network cable running from you router to your pc. Wireless or powerline is just the simple solution for pre-cat 5 homes or for laptop/mobile computing.


Did I read somewhere that wired networks are up to like 1 gigabyte/sec, that's pretty damned fast.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffkro /forum/post/17069390


Why didn't you run cat 5 while the basement was being refinished. Nothing is as good as having a network cable running from you router to your pc. Wireless or powerline is just the simple solution for pre-cat 5 homes or for laptop/mobile computing.


Did I read somewhere that wired networks are up to like 1 gigabyte/sec, that's pretty damned fast.

The basement was finished for my mom to live in, so wasn't really thinking I would need to stream my media down there (This was also done over 2 years ago before I had headed down this dark path of media streaming!!!). I ended up running Cat6 after the fact once I determined that powerline would not work. If I ever need more connections in the basement I at least know now I can go with MoCA instead of busting through walls to run more Cat6.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dbone1026 /forum/post/17069424


The basement was finished for my mom to live in, so wasn't really thinking I would need to stream my media down there (This was also done over 2 years ago before I had headed down this dark path of media streaming!!!). I ended up running Cat6 after the fact once I determined that powerline would not work. If I ever need more connections in the basement I at least know now I can go with MoCA instead of busting through walls to run more Cat6.

Damn Cat6 now, see people thought they were really doing something when they ran CAT5 all over their house during the construction phase and now look.
I swear there is no way to future proof your houses wiring. They need to install zippers on the walls.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffkro /forum/post/17069458


Damn Cat6 now, see people thought they were really doing something when they ran CAT5 all over their house during the construction phase and now look.
I swear there is no way to future proof your houses wiring. They need to install zippers on the walls.

Haha, yeah when I bought our house 5 years ago it was new construction and I had the builder run one lonely cat5 wire. I figured, why would I need anything more, wireless would handle everything
 
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