AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you buy the Toshiba 65H81 HDTV with the line doubler, do you really need the progressive scan DVD. Are there any advantages.


Jerry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,100 Posts
Jerry,


Look at this way. All dvd's are 480p to begin with. With progressive scan dvd player, the output is 480p - no conversion. With non progressive dvd the output is 480i and then add in the line doubler to get back the 480p. You can tell the difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,460 Posts
Sorry but you are wrong.. dvd's are not 480p by nature they are 480i. A progressive scan dvd player does its best to make the 480i as close to 480p as possible but true 480p looks better then any dvd can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
This question has occurred to me also. I think the best policy is to find a dealer who will loan you both types of DVD players and see if you can tell a difference. You could hook up each player (with the same DVD- rent them) to a different component input and switch between them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
I didn't know the new Toshiba had an internal line doubler. What does it convert input resolutions to?


Thank you in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Todd, you are well intentioned but incorrect. Every "Progressive" DVD player out there uses essentially the same deinterlacers (or line doublers) that prgressive TVs and projectors already have inside of them. It is even fairly common that your TV will have a better deinterlacer than inexpensive DVD players (because DVDs only have to deal well with film content, whereas TVs have to deal with bad video edits). Despite the fact that 480p is supported, almost all DVDs are 480i. See the following article:
http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volum...e-10-2000.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,460 Posts
There are a lot of advantages. The biggest is that when the dvd player does it it is all digital preserving all of the picture quality possible. When the TV does it the signal goes from digital to analog to digital again and then again to analog. This often results in a less perfect picture quality. Other advantages are that since progessive scan dvd players are built for one purpose they are often much better at it then tv's where the line doubler is often not a high priority, especially on the lower end tv's. I am very picky about my picture. I have a mits HDTV and the dvd picture looked arlight using the Mits Line doubler. I got a progressive scan dvd player and the difference is extremely noticably. A lot less jagged edges and motion artifacts. I have seen a $6000 pioneer ellite as well and admitteadly the TV's line doubler was very close to what a high end Progressive scan dvd can do but even then I could tell a little bit of a difference. Most tv's will be more like the Mits rather then the Pioneer elite. So unless you have a very high end TV you will see a noticable difference in picture quality by buying a progressive scan dvd player.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,220 Posts
I have the 65" Toshiba widescreen (TW65X81 - the 2000 model) and when I purchased an interlaced scan DVD player, my son brought over his progressive scan dvd player and we watched them side by side. The interlaced player had jagged lines in scanned sceens and the progressive did not. I returned the interlaced DVD player. I then purchased a progressive scan DVD player without 3:2 pulldown. Back it went. I now have a progressive scan DVD player with 3:2 pulldown and I now am happy. I have the JVC 65GD, available for $249 at Best Buy.


I believe the DVDs are 60 frames per second (fps) interlaced. The progressive scan extracts lines from every other frame to make a progressive scan 30 fps picture. Since the original source is a 24 fps movie, the progressive scan with 3:2 pulldown reassembles the original lines to make a 24 fps progressive scan picture.


Rick
 

·
AVS Forum Special Member
Joined
·
11,139 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by Savageone79:
I have a mits HDTV and the dvd picture looked arlight using the Mits Line doubler. I got a progressive scan dvd player and the difference is extremely noticably. A lot less jagged edges and motion artifacts.
Similar experience here with my Philips 64PH9905. With my Toshiba SD-6200 last year I thought deinterlacing its 480i output with the Philips' excellent Genesis circuit looked fairly good. Then, I tried the 6200's progressive output and noticed the most dramatic improvement in 'tough' scenes that contained a lot of jaggies. I outlined this earlier in "Dueling Genesis: Toshiba SD-6200, Philips 64PH9905" . --John

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
I don't think Hokey Smoke or Todd Christopher read the link in Hokey's reply. If they read the whole thing they would realize that there is a difference between "Video" mode & "film" mode deinterlacing. read all the documentation in Hokey's & Jim209's links for the details. Most TVs only do video mode deinterlacing, which only creates a close approximation of original frame structure. This is what Savageone79 was referring to, but what he is unaware of is that most DVDs are from film source & are encoded with the full frame structure available to a progressive DVD player. Almost all Progressive DVD players (except the Pioneer 434) do film mode deinterlacing which is far better because it can create, from film originated material, original complete frames.


The actual movie part of most DVDs have very good flags & rarely cause a progressive DVD player to drop from "Film" mode to "Video Mode". If you would have read HometheaterHiFi's whole article you would know these things.


Please don't give advice if you don't have a thorough understanding of the topic, if it's technical, provide a link & let the respondent make up there own mind.(Like Jim209 did)


With the prices of Progressive players getting very reasonable(I just bought a JVC that had a MSRP of $899 six months ago for $280 last week) I'd definitely get a progressive player!


Also one of the biggest advantages that no one has mentioned yet, is that many TVs will only do anamorphic compression on a progressive source, so you will lose 30% of your vertical resolution on Widescreen material if you have a 4:3 HDTV set and don't use the component digital inputs, which require a progressive source. If you have a widescreen set, this doesn't matter.


Hope this helps,


Mike G
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top