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Oh I forget: You can share a projector between your normal place of living and your holiday house. Only the screen and the speakers are needed twice.
Yes, a projector is much more portable than a 100" flat panel and that's great. But, as you say, you've got to either have two or more screens or move one to different locations and install it.

If you're moving from one neighborhood or city to another, which people do more and more nowadays, moving the screen and installing in a new abode is a one-time task. If you're moving a great distance, good luck preventing damage to the huge, expensive panel. But it's all doable.

Because a 100" panel will likely still be well under 100 lbs, the major problem will be getting the thing around corners, down or up stairs, etc. For example, in our home's case, I'd likely have to remove some drywall to get the thing into position and then re-install drywall, seam and paint it. My wife and I don't relish the thought, but for a one-shot deal we'd do it. OTOH, if large panels are made at least somewhat flexible, that would be a horse of a different color.

Also, because a panel's image will likely be brighter and more view-able in pretty bright light, we might install it upstairs rather than in the basement and use it as an everyday, all-in-one replacement for our 70". Then no "remodeling" necessary. In this case, to get the immersive effect of a large apparent image for movies, the chairs would have to be dragged closer to the screen. In our case, for a 100" wide panel, our two sets of eyes would want to be about 80 inches from the center-point of the panel. Most people would sit farther back than this even for a 65" TV, so unless the chairs/sofa can be easily slid around, a permanent room arrangement for that viewing distance is going to look a bit weird and cramped.

(Our present viewing distance of 96" from our 119"-diagonal Dalite HP 2.8-gain pull-down screen also looks a bit cramped, furniture-wise, but the viewing experience is fantastic. Whenever guests first see our HT, usually they sit down before anything's projected onto the screen. Almost invariably, as soon as they sit down they say something like "this is too close for me". But shortly after a movie starts they also invariably say "this is just like being in the theater! Fantastic!".)
 

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Some claim watching/playing on a VR headset is better than a projector, but I do not personally think so.
Watching movies with VR glasses is something I can't stand the thought of for many reasons, one being that movie watching in many ways is an inherently social thing to me. There is an intangible energy shared among an audience watching a good movie together. Imagining a future where people go to the movies or get together at home to watch a film, only to strap on a pair of VR headsets and disappear into their own world, really would remove all of the magic of cinema entirely.
 

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Screen size has a lot to do with it...As does the ability to watch widescreen movies without letterboxes. But I also find 16ftL or so in a dark room very soothing to watch. With flat panels I have to add bias lighting to avoid eye strain with long sessions at night as it can be tough to tame the brightness of most LED panels.
Agreed that's why OLED rules ;)

Having said that I love my 10 feet wide StewartFilm Screen FireHawk G3 and my new projector JVC RS600 :D

Their is something like feeling you are at the movies with better image and sound :eek: In addition, you don't have to put up with obnoxious audience, sticky floors, stinky food and so on...:laugh:
 

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LG won't be producing OLED panels at sizes that will compete with projectors in HTs anytime soon, based on their current and planned production plants and what sizes they will be prioritizing in the coming years.

The day flat panel technology is available in sizes and prices that can compete with projectors in home theaters, projector technology will also have evolved to a point where it will likely hold it's own quite well. The tech that is in Dolby Cinemas right now could have trickled down to the HT realm by then. For larger installations, projection will probably remain the most cost effective and practical option with regards to setup.

Bottom line is that we'll have more options in the future, and I can imagine TV panel technologies entering the small to medium sized space, which will be cool. Whatever the reality is in ten years in 2027, as long as it's not VR headsets we're watching I'll be happy.
 

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IMHO VR headsets are for young people,I tried one once made this old man dizzy & nauseous! Harkness I too seen Jaws in theaters many times,drove 3 nights in a row,50miles one way to see it multiple times,but I was 22,loved that movie!
 

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As others have mentioned, for me it's the difference between going to the movies and watching TV. I'm fortunate enough to have a dedicated theater room. I also have a 52" TV with 5.1 sound in the family room. (Unlike the theater, the family room is not light- or sound-controlled.) Sometimes we watch movies up there, but it's never the same.
 

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LG won't be producing OLED panels at sizes that will compete with projectors in HTs anytime soon, based on their current and planned production plants and what sizes they will be prioritizing in the coming years.

The day flat panel technology is available in sizes and prices that can compete with projectors in home theaters, projector technology will also have evolved to a point where it will likely hold it's own quite well. The tech that is in Dolby Cinemas right now could have trickled down to the HT realm by then. For larger installations, projection will probably remain the most cost effective and practical option with regards to setup.

Bottom line is that we'll have more options in the future, and I can imagine TV panel technologies entering the small to medium sized space, which will be cool. Whatever the reality is in ten years in 2027, as long as it's not VR headsets we're watching I'll be happy.
I did some "mild research" into this, and it looks like about 2035 - 2045 at least for SUPER big and affordable with good specs, according to some of the people in that field, so it's still a LONG ways off guys. You may get a 100" or so for around 10k much sooner than that, but 110"+ going to take a LONG time. They have a lot of problems to solve. Remember not to believe the people that do press releases or stock valuations, always listen to the CEO's as well as the top scientists and engineers opinions.

First they have to completely change the MFR process and MFR things at an almost quantum level, then they have to get that cost down. So it could even take longer than 15-25 years, but probably around then.
 

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Front projection is like going out to the movies, which represents a special event.

A TV of any size is like staying home and watching TV, which is a mundane, everyday occurrence.

I can't ever see myself not owning at least one of each.
 

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Front projection is like going out to the movies, which represents a special event.

A TV of any size is like staying home and watching TV, which is a mundane, everyday occurrence.

I can't ever see myself not owning at least one of each.
Agreed, there is a sense of awe and "magic" with front projection. The thought of light being cast across the room from behind you manifesting itself on screen as an image is something quite special. It also makes watching movies feel more like an event as the screen just sits there completely white and blank before it starts, but then the lights go out and the projector switches on, and the once blank screen is turned into a window into another world.

That projection by its very nature requires you to turn off the lights and thus pay full attention to the movie just adds to the feeling of it being a more special event as well. With light emitting panels, turning off the light is merely an option. Because of all of this, watching movies becomes elevated to something a bit more special with a projector.

A personal note to add is that I feel the image you get from light reflecting off a surface produces a slightly more analog and cinematic look than TVs.
 

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Screen size is the main attribute.

The filmic look is another (since I watch mostly movies, and grew up watching movies in the movie theaters). I also really like what a flat panel can do for some movies too. Though when I was into flat panels for some reason I was much more distracted in a videophile-like way, chasing a certain image quality. Once I moved to projection I just started enjoying the content much more. I've watched vastly more movies on my projection set up than I ever did on my plasma.

Another is the flexibility to alter the image size, via zooming/masking, to get the best combination of immersion and picture quality depending on the source.

I might have said "watching movies in the dark" as well, since that to me is a huge part of being immersed in a movie. But I would (and did) watch a flat panel in the dark as well.

Another bonus: along with the image size is the commensurate size of the surround sound. Big speaker set ups matched with much smaller flat panels always created a mismatch between the picture and sound for me. With the big screen image, I can enjoy the fuller bigger sound of larger, more full range speakers, and it feels "right" for the image.
I quoted Rich as I can’t agree more with his reasoning for all the above.

To that I might add screen size is not as important to me as immersion and varying screen size not as important as varying immersion. When I walk into a commercial theater I am free to sit in any seat, any row I feel like and that makes a profound difference in that given movie experience. With projection it is very easy and nice to vary immersion to suit my wishes and also my guests. With a flat panel TV all you can do is move your chair. This ability is also the key to CIH presentation along with other more appropriate forms of presentation other than CIW that is wrong in so many ways.

As to the feeling of film like or some call it cinema like. It is partly the darkness around you and the image not competing but it is also a very real vision and perceptual change, some described as softer on your eyes. In a bright room our eyes can’t adjust over the wide range of aperture they can in a dark room. When an image fades to black our iris open to the max and seek out that tiny bit of illuminate to create vision. Just like stars are in the noonday sky and we can’t see them because of the competing light of daytime.

There is so much talk about how projectors will never have the brightness for HDR and such. There is no need for it. Our eyes have the ability of adjusting 22f stops. That is the doubling of a light 22 consecutive times. Our eyes have evolved to be able to see CR on a dark moonless night with only the light of a couple stars to the blazing sun light of clear skies at high noon. Front projection allows closer duplication of that than a flat panel in a lighted room ever could.

The thing I have always liked best about front projection though is when properly done with a Lambertian screen surface free of any artifacts, the screen disappears and the illusion that is the image is if you are looking thru an open window. 3D tricks are not needed because the director of the cinematography allows for 3D qualities with how he manages depth of field in the shot. I have never got past that with any kind of flat panel screen. There is always a surface there that the image presented on.
 

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Size was the first attribute that drew me in. When projectors finally got down to where I could get a decent one for around $3K I was giddy with the fact that I could watch movies at home on a huge screen. The second one was a few years after that when I added a lens and was able to do CIH, that was almost as good of an upgrade as the original projector.
 
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