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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have only come across 2, the terk tv55 and the channelmaster. Is one better than the other? It will be installed in the attic. Thanks.
 

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Actually - there is no one "BEST antenna" for all circumstances. There are lots of factors that come into play - what channels you need to receive, how strong is their signal where you will be receiving it, how directional (for multipath ) .


Do some checking on the following sites about what they recommend - www.antennaweb.org www.titantv.com


Also, putting an antenna in an attic cuts down on the amount of signal you have to work with - it is much better to put most antennas outside on the roof (and don't let your HOA tell you that you can't - see my sig.)


------------------


You CAN put antennas on your owned and/or controlled property...

http://www.fcc.gov/csb/facts/otard.html
 

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1CAMP,


You should also keep in mind that you don't necessarily need an HDTV antenna. A regular UHF/VHF antenna works very well for me. Depending on whether any of the digital stations in your area are VHF, you might evan be able to get away with a simple UHF antenna.
 

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To clarify a popular misconception:


There is no such thing as an "HDTV antenna". This is a marketing term and very misleading.


Antennas do one thing - receive radio-frequency signals (RF) on different bands. Those signals can be AM radio stations, FM stations, analog TV signals, cell phones, cordless phones, shortwave broadcasts, and (of course) digital television.


DTV signals travel on radio waves in the same spectrum as analog TV signals (channels 2-69). In many cases, conventional TV antennas will do the job for DTV reception.


In other cases, they may not. Multipath and low signal levels call for antennas with more gain and the ability to reject unwanted multipath signals. This doesn't mean the antennas have to be expensive - just designed to be efficient.


For further reading on tests of antennas that work for DTV reception, go to
www.projectorexpert.com


and look under the "DTV Articles" section.


KC


PS - The Terk TV55 is not a consistent performer for UHF DTV signals.
 

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Yea, what he said

Also remember that even though a station (say channel 5 VHF)

Comes on with a DTV transmitter (Say channel 28 UHF)

At the end of the transition they have the option on weather or not to return to their old channel (5 VHF Now dtv).

If I were to put up an antenna

I would cover both bands


PS the DTV band is ch 2-59

Ch 60-68 will go to the highest bidder

------------------

Studio Broadcast Engineer

KET


[This message has been edited by woowoo (edited 07-11-2001).]


[This message has been edited by woowoo (edited 07-11-2001).]
 

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Woowoo, you commented that at the end of the transition, they have the right to return to their old channel. Southern Wisconsin's CBS CH-3 will be broadcasting DTV on CH-50. They also mentioned that they might consider returning to CH-3 after the transition. Why would they want to go from a UHF channel 50 back to a VHF CH-3 with all the problems that low-frequency VHF channels carry with them, like atmospheric skip, noise etc? I was hoping that someday all TV broadcasting would be on UHF frequencies.
 

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1CAMP:


I have the Terk 55. But, I can't say that I recommend it. Do a search in the HDTV Hardware forum for this and you'll find plenty of negative comments on it. For me, it works to pick up a VHF channel. But, it proved to be a pain to aim it in my attic. Also, it costs $100. As someone above said, you don't necessarily need to spend that kind of money. The popular (here at least) Radio Shack double bow tie works great at getting the UHF channels. I got mine for $19 including tax. The guy at Radio Shack said that it is being discontinued.


It's ugly and in the attic. But the signal is beautiful (and it didn't cost a fortune). I also had to aim it. I used trial and error until I got all of the stations dialed in with one spot. All of the transmitters that I hit are in roughly the same location or on a line from where I am. If you are not, then you might need to consider an antenna and a rotor.


Again, I wasn't happy with the Terk since it wouldn't pull in all 4 of the stations that I wanted it to (and the fact that it cost $100). I was also under the impression that it was supposed to work in any direction ("omni-directional"). But I found it to be very sensitive to where I aimed it.


Best of luck.


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-Jason


[This message has been edited by JasonATL (edited 07-11-2001).]
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Allen A:
Woowoo, you commented that at the end of the transition, they have the right to return to their old channel. Southern Wisconsin's CBS CH-3 will be broadcasting DTV on CH-50. They also mentioned that they might consider returning to CH-3 after the transition. Why would they want to go from a UHF channel 50 back to a VHF CH-3 with all the problems that low-frequency VHF channels carry with them, like atmospheric skip, noise etc? I was hoping that someday all TV broadcasting would be on UHF frequencies.
Well - part of it is that VHF doesn't require as much power to get equivalent distance (= cheaper to operate). The power bill is a significent part of any TV stations expenses.



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You CAN put antennas on your owned and/or controlled property...

http://www.fcc.gov/csb/facts/otard.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thanks for the info people. i think i'm just gonna play around with a few and see what happens.
 

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The ChannelMaster 4251 Parabolic is the most powerful UHF antenna.
 
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