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Nope. That's the main reason for the IBOC (in-band, on-channel) strategy of the FCC. The radio stations keep their same designated frequencies, with no plan to auction off their traditional portion of the spectrum. In time, if digital receivers become ubiquitous, some broadcasters may turn off their analog modulation, but that seems unlikely during this generation.
 

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It should be noted that IBOC, as a "strategy", was NOT developed or proposed by the FCC. IBOC was designed and promoted by the broadcast industry -- the NAB and major group owners who, not so coincidentally, also own iBiquity. The FCC went along with the flow and approved the technology, although it has yet to promulgate detailed rules.


By developing a digital system that does NOT require the "sunset" of analogue broadcasting (as does HDTV), the industry guaranteed that traditional radio will be around for many years. But they dramatically reduced the incentive for consumers to embrace HD Radio.


I like HD and support it, but the naysayers (and they are many) argue that Eureka 147 would have been a far better solution to introduce digital radio in the U.S.
 

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The only possible migration I could imagine very long term is FM stations switching to mono so they could add another HD channel. Is it possible to slip a bunch of COFDM carriers in that space without interfering with the main carrier?


Eureka 147 hasn't been a real success in the rest of the world. I'm glad we waited for better codecs, although it makes a lot more sense to dedicate a separate digital band than dealing with the potential analog interference problems. I think we'd be having fewer HD radio reception problems if they were in their own band where they could crank up the power.
 

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Scowl,

The idea of FM stations switching to mono would be a pretty good solution.


Consider this:

- Most car radios will not decode stereo after about 30 miles from a 100kw/1,500ft station. 30 miles is also borderline for reliable HD reception, so you wouldn't gain much (if anything) for stereo in the car.


- It's probably not much different for home receivers: By the time HD Radio is un-receivable, the stereo is probably going to be pretty bad.


-You probably don't need to hear emergency broadcasts in stereo.


-In 30 years, any radio that doesn't have HD-Radio probably isn't going to be able to do stereo any way.


I kinda like to compare the adoption of HD Radio to that of Dolby-B noise reduction.


Dolby was just a nice (and somewhat) idea at first, but then became ubiquitous, and any system that didn't have Dolby on it wasn't worth buying.
 

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Well here's an odd question...since over the air tv can be received as audio for some radios or scanners (channel 6 is 87.7 here) what will happen when that switches to hdtv or would anything happen at all ? I thought they were going to free up that bandwith for EMS or something security related.
 

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There is a great article about the various Digital Audio broadcast services worldwide, in the newest edition of the "World Radio and TV Handbook 2007":

http://www.wrth.com/


In some places, they are planning to stop selling DAB receivers. I think it was mentioned that some countries want to end analog radio entirely. Several new schemes are taking over from the existing services. Interesting read. My WRTH 2007 was purchased last night at Borders.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdovell /forum/post/0


Well here's an odd question...since over the air tv can be received as audio for some radios or scanners (channel 6 is 87.7 here) what will happen when that switches to hdtv or would anything happen at all ?

No TV stations will be broadcasting on channel six any more.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattdp /forum/post/0


Scowl,

The idea of FM stations switching to mono would be a pretty good solution.

But would it work technically? I've demonstrated my ignorance of analog electronics way too many times here to figure it out myself. It seems like the station would have have to limit the bandwidth of their main carrier to 19 khz and that means no RDS or any other SCA services.


Whoops, did it again!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdovell /forum/post/0


Well here's an odd question...since over the air tv can be received as audio for some radios or scanners (channel 6 is 87.7 here) what will happen when that switches to hdtv or would anything happen at all ? I thought they were going to free up that bandwith for EMS or something security related.

The reason it worked is because the TV sound was FM just like radio. The sound on digital tv is also digital, so no it won't work.


The eliminated channels will be 52-69
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by milehighmike /forum/post/0


I believe Channel 6 will also be used by two other stations - one in WVa, the other in Anchorage.

You're right. Looking at the list two Alaskan stations will be on lower VHF. KYES will be switching to channel 5 after the transition and KYUK will be switching to channel 3.


A number of stations in West Virginia will be using lower VHF channels after the transition: WDTV will be channel 5, and WOAY will be channel 4.


WEDY will be using channel 6 as will KRMA in Denver, KBSD in Ensign, KS, KTVM in Butte, MT, WRGB in Schenectady, NY, WPVI in Philadelphia, and KWYP in Laramie, WY which is not broadcasting in digital yet.


The list shows about a hundred stations around the country which will be switching to lower VHF channels after analog TV is shut down. So much for freeing up that spectrum.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdovell /forum/post/0


free up that bandwith for EMS or something security related.

Since trunking allows hundreds of different users on the same 5 freqs, and the fact that trunking radios are dirt cheap now, it's really doubtful that by the time the switch is made, that communication center managers will really push to get those freqs.
 

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The theoretical concern is while those five frequencies are more than enough to handle the traffic for a typical day, during a regional emergency trunking systems tend to overload and fail. I guess they're hoping to keep these extra frequencies in reserve.
 

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Quote:
The list shows about a hundred stations around the country which will be switching to lower VHF channels after analog TV is shut down. So much for freeing up that spectrum.

Some of these stations will change to upper VHF or UHF. KRMA, which was planning to stay on its analog channel 6, has filed with the FCC to stay on channel 18, its current digital channel. Other stations, such as WBBM in Chicago, will probably follow suit. Unfortunately, stations in rural areas, such as MT and WY, will probably not vacate lower VHF channels since they want to benefit from the coverage the lower frequencies afford them to reach more viewers. So it looks like IBOC is here to stay for some time.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by milehighmike /forum/post/0


Some of these stations will change to upper VHF or UHF.

Go through the channel election list at the fcc.gov web site and you'll see these hundred or so stations I'm talking about will either continue to use lower-VHF channels or in some cases move to lower-VHF channels from UHF channels.


They're a very small percentage of the stations out there (almost all stations are switching to UHF and upper-VHF) but my perception that lower-VHF would be free of televisions stations after the analog shutdown was totally wrong.
 

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The final channel list is somewhat dated now and does not reflect subsequent filings by TV stations to change channels. But I agree that there will probably be enough stations left on lower VHF channels that the spectrum cannot be freed up for dedication to something else, such as digital radio. And if the spectrum was freed up by forcing the remaining channels to move to high VHF or UHF, Congress may mandate the spectrum be auctioned off, just like channels 52-69 will be, which could be a significant hinderance to radio stations looking at cost benefit/payback scenarios to go with digital only transmissions.
 
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