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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone.


I have a question I couldn't find an answer to.


I have a 32" Samsung 1080i LCD TV (model LNS3241D). It has this effect which is hard to describe... when a scene is very bright like a skyline and the camera is moving from right to left for example, the scene flickers a bit until it's back to a more darker scene. It's quite annoying.


Is this due to the "interlace" lines? Will a "progressive" TV fix this effect?


Also, I don't know but the TV has always appeared way too bright, would that be a 1080 I / P issue or doesn't matter and I still haven't found the proper contract/brightness setting?


Thank you!
 

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What is the video content source you are sending to your 1366x768 LCD progressive scan TV?

Are you able to ajust the backlining on your TV if so both it and the brightnesss should be about 50%?

24fps film based content can have what is know as 24fps Judder which is caused by the film camera not being able to keep up with the motion especially when panning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies.


I'm not sure I understand what you guys mean by my TV is progressive, it's a model from 2006 it says 1080-I not -P.


This effect only happens on HD channels and DVD's, not regular SD channels (satellite).
 

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looks like 720p to me. it ACCEPTS up to 1080i, but anything it displays will be 720p. (well, actually 1366x768, but basically 720p).


what you are describing could be due to cable tv compressing the hd channels.
 

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Look at this website, there are the specificity of your samsung lcd.

http://www.lcdtvbuyingguide.com/sams...-lns3241d.html


* 32 "Samsung LCD TV, HDTV 1366 x 768 Native Resolution.

* TV Scan Lines 480i, 480p, 720p, 1080i

* Component video input (Y, Pb, Pr) (480i/480p/720p/1080i).



So, this lcd but accepts 1080i signals to 720p or more wide exactly 768p (native resolution), I know what happens with this tv with 1080p, 2006 being maybe not accept it, but if indeed it does, would climb to its native resolution .




The thing is, I understand what you're saying, you mean a kind of "vibration" as if those scenes will flash, but it is more remarkable to see the horizon or panning of camera it is as though a lot of wasps and flies were buzzing.
not occur in the whole screen, if not in the bright parts, remote or in the vicinity of mountains, forests or ceilings.



In the late early 2008 I almost bought the Sony 40V3000, had an offer from a shop near home, but one scene in particular stopped me from doing so, the effect you describe happened too often so off bluray / HDDVD, DVD or HD video in any player, I was a 60Hz but 1080p screen, preferring to wait for a 2008 model, since the V3000 is 2007.



However, if the effect you describe is the same that you mention it, I could tell that even in my samsung LN40A650 I have seen this effect (even less in reality), especially in the program INFOCUS HDNet, as do many panning it's getting on roofs in Spanish, French or UK, just to capture horizons or any forest, I apply the Noise Reduction to low and low-intensity failure, does not disappear entirely, when HDNet aired a documentary of the Canyon the red or Yellowstone Park, more or less the same thing happens to pass through the mountains. I understand that the Grand Canyon show that originally in IMAX.



A more recent TV help secure and enhance your multimedia experience, they might think of a plasma, of course if you are thinking to buy a new HDTV, gloss over the problem, I fear it is because that lcd should have high intensity backligth and no way to regulate it, at least I think that in models 2008, 2009, 2010 (probably some 2007) is more usual for a driver's precencia the intensity of the lamps and my lcd 40A650 has the options of off, level low, medium and high, I used to avoid being dazzled by the intensity of the lamps, besides the TV set Film Mode and move the contrast and brightness.



 
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