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Discussion Starter #1
where can we find the specs for the ISCO II?


Like:


1. Aperture diameter

2. Throw calculator

3. Expansion ratio

4. Light loss


etc. etc. etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
ok,


throw calculator can be downloaded here
http://www.iscousa.com/


But I'm a little confused on which lense I need to select.

I only gives two otions for the G10


Standard or,

Isco optic


then should I also check the 16:9 video attachment box?


confused.


one more assumption... since I read this on the website:

Video Attachment 16:9 II NEW LENS!

For projection in home theatres to get the 16:9 picture (actual "stretch" factor 1.33x) This anamorphic has the exact 16:9 factor and is designed considering the shift of most LCD/DLP projectors. You gain up to 25 % more light on the screen, as the complete panel size is used.



I'm assuming the lense has 8% calculated light loss(33%-25%=8%) . Are these bad assumptions?
 

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The calculator appears to be limited in which projectors it accepts. It does not have the NEC LT100 or LT150, any Plus models, or Proxima DX1.
 

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Are you looking for anamorphic stretch, (1.33->1.78)? If so, the ISCO-2 is what you want. It sits in front of the projector. Light loss is minimal and you gain one third more light by converting the normal 4:3 panel to 16:9.


Since it works on a D-ILA, it should easily work on anything with a smaller lens such as most common DLPs. It would be a slam dunk for an LT-150, (I have one).


The throw distance is the same as your projector, it just expands the width by a third, (1.33x1.33=1.78).


There is a focus on the lens but it will focus over a wide range from about 5' to infinity if I recall.


Hope this helps,

Phil
 

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In all the threads regarding the ISCO or Panamorph lenses I always read about the fact that much time is needed to properly install the lense in front of the projector. It takes a lot of time to get the best picture.


This isn't a problem for those who have their projectors on a fixed position.


I however place my projector on a table every time I use it. I am only interested in such a lense when it is very easy and quick to reinstall.
 

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Phil:

Does the ISCO effect the location of the top and bottom of the original image? In other words when I place it in front of the existing projector will I need to adjust the projector up and down?


Thanks
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Phil Olson
The throw distance is the same as your projector, it just expands the width by a third, (1.33x1.33=1.78).
I think it might be misleading to say that the the throw distance is the same as your projector. If you want to keep your projector in the same place as it is without the lens, and use the same screen, you will have to be able to zoom (make the image smaller) so that all of the vertical pixels fit on the screen. People with 16:9 screens and no anamorphic lens currently have a third of their pixels below or above the screen, but these pixels are dark. With the anamorphic lens, these pixels will be lit up and have to fit on the screen. Many people don't have the zoom range to fit the whole 4:3 image in the middle of their 16:9 screen. This was the reason so many people wanted the panamorph since it doesn't require changing the zoom at all.


- Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Quote:
Originally posted by Chris Satterlee



I think it might be misleading to say that the the throw distance is the same as your projector. If you want to keep your projector in the same place as it is without the lens, and use the same screen, you will have to be able to zoom (make the image smaller) so that all of the vertical pixels fit on the screen.

- Chris
Chris, this is my current problem. Since the distance from my projector to screen is fixed I can't zoom down enough to use horizontal expansion. I'm trying everything I can think of to alleviate this problem. Vertical compression may be my only solution.:mad:


Here's more on the ISCO II
http://www.iscooptic-usa.com/english.../16_9video.htm


I still can't find anthing that tells me the total dimensions of mount and lens, or aperture dimensions.:(
 

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Hey Tryg, how about using YxY or Zoomplayer to alter your image size to fit vertically into your 16:9 screen (assuming you're using HTPC :) ).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
reduce the image size to the projector then use the lense to expand it? ha ha



Hey here's another crazy idea. Use software to rotate the image 90 degrees and fit to screen. Then rotate your projector 90 degrees so the image is now 3:4. Now use the ISCO I with 1.44 expansion to bring the image back to nearly 4:3.

:D
 

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Yeah that is kinda crazy but remember the other advantages of anamorphink lenses: 33% more brightness, less pixelization, smoother image, blah, blah, blah.....
 

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The throw ratio with an ISCO can be calculated with a few specs. You need the original throw distance range, the screens width, and the percentage of change for the ISCO, which is horizontally stretched by 33%. The distance will be shorter with the lens than without.


Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Quote:
Originally posted by Jason Turk
The distance will be shorter with the lens than without.


Thanks!
Jason, are you saying that the lens will make the overall image(vertical) slightly larger than without? or will the vertical stay exactly the same.


if it does slightly change it what is the ratio? 1.02?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Huey
Yeah that is kinda crazy but remember the other advantages of anamorphink lenses: 33% more brightness, less pixelization, smoother image, blah, blah, blah.....
None of those apply to a lens that does horizontal expansion...
 

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Darren,


Horizontal expansion effectively does the same thing as vertical compression does, so all the above improvements do apply.


-Dean.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by luvmytivo



None of those apply to a lens that does horizontal expansion...
How did you figure that???? You are still getting the full resolution of the panel onto the 16:9 screen. The advantages are all the same.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Tryg



Jason, are you saying that the lens will make the overall image(vertical) slightly larger than without? or will the vertical stay exactly the same.


if it does slightly change it what is the ratio? 1.02?
No, it just stretches horizontally. If you can throw your full 4:3 panel onto your 16:9 screen then you are in business with the ISCO II. I think you can, by tilting the lens, affect the vertical image a small percentage, but I am unsure of the exact amount.
 

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Tom...I have both the Sanyo XP21N and the NEC LT150. Neither projector is listed on the lens selector. Is there a lens that will work for both? I am more interested in getting the correct one for Sanyo, but working with the LT150 would be a nice bonus.
 

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Tom,


Did you ever publish review of ISCO II vs Panamorph?
 

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Does anyone have any data on size, weight and perhaps the distance from the front on the optic to the outside surface of a hush box if you push them as close as possible?


Has anyone projected HDTV though the ISCO II using a D-ILA? If so, how did you come by a 'tall and skinny' full panel image to feed to the ISCO?


I have read a ton of posts, but missed these if they appeared earlier.


TIA


Vince
 
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