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Discussion Starter #1
I just posted this over in the >$3500 Digital Projector forum, so I thought it might also go here. (This is for moving an anamorphic lens back and forth)

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If you're handy, you can build your own motorized Isco "sled" for around $40 + parts, using a linear actuator like this:

http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.as...-1439&catname=


That particular one is an AC model, but I used a 24VDC model instead of that.


They're very easy to wire, using a cheap DPDT switch for polarity reversal to change direction.

I replaced the aluminum Isco base with polypropylene and it slides very smoothly on another piece of poly underneath. The built-in limit switches stop the unit very accurately each time.

My DC actuator cost $90, but I'm sure there must be less expensive ones out there somewhere. Tough part is finding one with adequate "throw" distance.

The model I used is like this:

http://makeashorterlink.com/?B44A21527


It's very quiet, but kind of slow.

Cheers

David


Here's a picture:
 

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Not bad. Seems like it would do the job. It would be smoother moving if you would use some linear bearings on a rod or some linear slides. That way, it might move faster depending on the actuator, since there would be less drag.

For cost reasons, I would reccomend linear bearings on a rod. Thompson bearing has some ball bushing ones called Super 8, Super 12.... that I have used before on work projects. They are not too expensive, just harder for an average joe to get ahold of. If you are interested in something like this, let me know and we can discuss it farthur.


Also, if you could get an actuator that has a spring to close or open, you could wire it up with an X-10 outlet so that you could program it to work with your remote!
 

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Thanks for the comments. The model I used has "5000N" (newtons?) of force, what that actually translates to BTSOOM. But it really is strong. It was designed for hospital beds and that type of thing.


Not sure what you mean about "spring to close or open", but controlling it with X-10 or IR would be very cool.

-David
 

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There are pnumatic cylinders that have a spring action to them, either to push the piston or pull the piston. So, if you remove the power, the piston would close and once you add the power, the piston would open. Most of the ones I have dealt with are pnumatic, but there may be some that are solenoid based as well. The stroke may be a problem though.
 
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