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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I took the ISF course a few weeks ago and just recently purchased some equipment to Calibrate the Televisions in my house. The equipment I own for Calibration are:


Avia Pro DVD's

OpticONE CA-6X color analyzer

Sencore 403 Pattern Generator

Laptop


Last night I decided to start calibrating my television. First things I did was right down all defaults. I also own the Service manual for the television.


I started off the calibrations doing the following using the Sencore Generator:


1. Used the Pluge pattern to set Black level (Brightness control)

2. Used the Needle Pulse pattern to set White level (Contrast control)

3. Set sharpness using sharpness pattern (set to 0)

4. Set Color and Tint using SMPTE color bars


When I finished my Hitachi seemed to show more Red. I guess this was the Red push that is mentioned in numerous threads regarding Hitachi.


At this point, I figured it was time to set Greyscale. I hooked up my CA-6X Color analyzer and plugged everything in. The first thing I did was take the default Greyscale readings. Here is when I ran into a few problems. I tried using the Vertical Grey Scale pattern, but it showed 14 Vertical bars and the instructions said there should be only 11. I decided to then use a Window pattern to take my measurements. I took the measurements from 100 IRE to 0 stepping down 5 IRE. After this was done, I figured I was use the Window IRE patterns to set my television. Well, 4 hours later going back and forth, I was only able to get 100 IRE and 0 IRE close to the x,y c0ordinates. All other IRE figures were off, with the low IRE not even registering a Kelvin temperature. Anyways, when I was finished, the set had a blue push which was quite apparent.


Well, I am not about to give up, so I figure I will put everything back to the default and start again. Before I start again, I would like the experts to offer any suggestions. My first questions are:


1. Did I follow the right procedure using the patterns from the Sencore device?

2. Was using the Window IRE patterns the best way to set Greyscale tracking?

3. Why did I have 14 Vertical Bars and not 11? My horizontal bars were 11!

4. Any other advice?


Also, it seems that one side of my set is Bluish and the other side is Redish when viewing white material. I would assume that if I get this set up correctly, both the Left and Right sides will be white with no hint of each colour?


Feel free to offer up any suggestions.
 

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Greetings


I cringe ... your terminology is all wrong. Don't you remember anything about compromising from the seminar? It's all there.


First off ... forget about the generator. Just use AVIA and the window box patterns.


Get contrast and brightness set up first. (Remember that AVIA does not tell you where to set contrast ... only where not to set it.) All that needle bending and blooming stuff is about where not to set it ...


Now do grayscale ... Pick 30 and 80% ... zero them in ... and then take a quick look at the mid range 50/60% ... see what it is ... This tells you if you have to move one of the ends up or down.


Take a look at 20% ... make sure it is not too green as Hitachis can get ... if so ... you have to compromise the dark end to make the blacks look blacker.


Do the color decoder stuff ... that should be easy ... it's all there.


Of course there are some other things in the service menu that also make things better ... but you have to research to find those. Keohi is a place to start.


And I hope you remember from the seminar ... "there is no such thing as an ISF calibration."


To get rid of the blue tint on the left side and the red tint on the right side, you have to employ lens striping to fix this. Do a search ... keohi ...


Regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the information. I have been reading lots of information on the web as well as reference back to my ISF book.


I am quite confident I can get Contrast and Brightness set up.


I will try again tonight after reading some more as well as taking everyones recommendations.


The only thing that I am still a little confused about is what is the main difference in using the Greyscale step pattern and a Window pattern? Wouldn't it be easier to use the step pattern?


Thanks again,
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bgarner
...

I do have a follow up question. Do I use the Window IRE pattern to setup up grey scale or should I use a step Grey Scale pattern?
It is always a good idea to at least review a step or ramp grey scale pattern. I like the one with shallow steps on AviaPro to visually check tracking, brightness, contrast and clipping. It is found in Fixed Panel Suite 1 - Luma Levels.


Measuring gray scale can be done with steps or windows if your display does not have much color shift across it. I would choose a window pattern if it does shift colors.
 

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Greetings


A CRT RPTV has lots of color shift ... that is why a step pattern is a bad idea.


Regards
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael TLV
And I hope you remember from the seminar ... "there is no such thing as an ISF calibration."
I'm curious, what does that phrase mean..?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan
I'm curious, what does that phrase mean..?
I believe what that means is that ISF is an organization that offers training and certification to train people how to calibrate images correctly. The calibration's are done according to a standard that the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) adopted back in 1988 and has been modified a few times since then.


If you want more info about this then see these two sites:

http://www.videoessentials.com/index.php
http://www.imagingscience.com/
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris062
I believe what that means is that ISF is an organization that offers training and certification to train people how to calibrate images correctly. The calibration's are done according to a standard that the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) adopted back in 1988 and has been modified a few times since then.


If you want more info about this then see these two sites:

http://www.videoessentials.com/index.php
http://www.imagingscience.com/
That's what I figured, thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hi Umr,


I have been following one of your other threads regarding your Software along with Eye-One Pro. At the time, I already had the OpticONE package, however, I am still interested in trying the EyeONE Beamer Pro. Do you have any recommendations on where I could find it cheap? You may want to PM me with the information if you have it.


Thanks,
 

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Holy cow... Is this what we can expect when we seek out a "qualified" ISF tech to do a calibration?


"First things I did was right down all defaults".
 

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Greetings


Just tells you that all ISF guys are different and of differing skill sets. Just like mechanics ... and doctors and engineers and lawyers ...


The onus is on you to determine if he is knowledgable on your TV set. Over 4000 people have taken the seminar ... only about 1% are considered any good.


Regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I did write down the default settings BBH? I am not a complete idiot.


I would think that this would go without saying.


Also, although I have taken the course, I don't consider myself "Qualified". I am just doing this stuff for myself and trying to learn how I can master this art.


To BBH. ---> If you haven't nothing useful to offer, then I suggest you keep you f&*&^^& comments to yourself.


Idiot!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hi Michael TLV,


Thanks for your advice. I decided to go back and do some reading from my ISF book as well as research more information and follow your directions above. I was finally able to successfully calibrate my Hitachi television and my Sanyo Z3 projector. The colors are amazing, and the wife is very impressed. The whites are perfect, and the darks are darks.


I was also able to get my Gamma to 2.54 and 2.44 on the televisions compared to the 1.8 that I started with on the Sanyo Z3.


I am sure that I can make it better, but need to practise and learn more.


However, I have a question.


It seems that my struggles was with using the Sencore 403 Generator. When I used the Avia Pro disks, everything worked flawlessly.


Is there anyone that has compared using the Avia Pro disks with a Generator? Just curious to know why the Generator seemed to be less accurate than Avia Pro.


Thanks again to everyone for responding and helping me understand what I thought I learned in the course.


4 more televsions inhouse to go.
 

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I have a problem calibrating a monitor with a generator when there are no perfect DVD players available. I think that you have to calibrate the monitor while using the primary source, and when you upgrade DVD players, you will have to calibrate again. It's nice to have a monitor calibrated with a generator, but that doesn't mean that you will get satisfactory performance with your various sources. That you were able to achieve proper results using a test DVD is proof in point, IMHO.
 

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Greetings


We use the Test Discs first ... over and above the signal generators because ...


DVD players are not perfect. We go in knowing this ... (well at least some of us :) ) ... components in a player might have a 10-15% variance over the next player even on the same assembly line. You want 3%-5% variance? A company called LINN offers players with this tolerance in their products ... $3K US ... and UP.


So because the DVD player is imperfect (our TV is too) ... we will calibrate the TV to account for the weaknesses of the DVD player. This is why we use the DVD player and the test discs ... and not the signal generator. The generator is a device of last resort if no DVD player is present.


You optimize the TV to the specific DVD player. And once you do that ... most other signals fed into the tV will be close ... 99/100 times but the DVD will be the most accurate. (Unfortunately ... swap out the DVD player and things change ... so you need to tune it up again.)


IF you do it to the generator ... your tv will be most accurate when you look at the test patterns ... and nothing else.


It's like baking a perfect cake and putting it under glass so you can't taste it. (Generator method) or letting you taste it too (test disc method). In both cases, the cake will spoil over time anyway. I'd rather at least taste the cake ...


Regards
 
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