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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I just moved into a new apartment with hardwood floors and I thought I would definitely need an isolation pad for my eD A2-300 so it doesn't send vibrations to the floor and walls. I live on the ground floor, so no one is underneath me.


I've had the sub hooked up for about 2 weeks now without an isolation pad and I don't notice any "dancing" or obvious vibrations in the walls even with hard hitting blu-rays. Plus my neighbors above and next to me haven't complained.


Is it worth still getting an isolation pad (eD makes ones to fit their own subs) for better sound quality alone? I've heard that it improves sound for many people, but some people think de-coupling the sub from the floor can take alot of the sub's power away.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by maytime /forum/post/20861300


I've heard that it improves sound for many people, but some people think de-coupling the sub from the floor can take alot of the sub's power away.

What happens is when you have a sub that isn't isolated, it will turn the floor and walls into additional resonating surfaces. That gives the impression that the sub is more powerful (because more vibrations are heard/felt), but the vibrations are often a fraction of a second behind the main sub driver, in addition to rattling everything. Some describe this as "sloppy" bass.


Isolating the sub will reduce the extra vibrations, which makes the sub seem less powerful, but it also benefits by leaving just the bass from the driver, which results in the improved sound. And then you can adjust the gain on the sub to compensate for any power that seems to be lost.


Isolation pads often help reduce sound going to neighboring dwellings (although they don't completely eliminate them if you're driving hard enough), but the increase in sound quality alone is enough justification to using isolation to many people.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulpa /forum/post/20861679


What happens is when you have a sub that isn't isolated, it will turn the floor and walls into additional resonating surfaces. That gives the impression that the sub is more powerful (because more vibrations are heard/felt), but the vibrations are often a fraction of a second behind the main sub driver, in addition to rattling everything. Some describe this as "sloppy" bass.


Isolating the sub will reduce the extra vibrations, which makes the sub seem less powerful, but it also benefits by leaving just the bass from the driver, which results in the improved sound. And then you can adjust the gain on the sub to compensate for any power that seems to be lost.


Isolation pads often help reduce sound going to neighboring dwellings (although they don't completely eliminate them if you're driving hard enough), but the increase in sound quality alone is enough justification to using isolation to many people.

Thanks for the info! I'll order one for the sound benefits alone. Maybe my neighbors just haven't complained yet eventhough they get some annoying bass sounds.
 

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I don't know how big the Elemental Designs pad is, but you might look to see if the Auralex Subdude is the same size. They're like $50 through Amazon (with free shipping.)


You can also build your own. There's nothing really exotic about isolation pads. My own is a plank of MDF and sanding sponges from Home Depot. Total cost was ~$12.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulpa /forum/post/20861787

I don't know how big the Elemental Designs pad is, but you might look to see if the Auralex Subdude is the same size. They're like $50 through Amazon (with free shipping.)


You can also build your own. There's nothing really exotic about isolation pads. My own is a plank of MDF and sanding sponges from Home Depot. Total cost was ~$12.

Or you can get them at your local guitar center for the same price.
 

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I actually used nothing more than 4 foam blocks from a server I unpacked, that white closed cell stuff. Once I got tired of hearing the wife complain it looked horrible I built a nice little thing with scrap wood for the platform, that cost roughly 25k, some more of the foam for the bottom for free, and the lady next door made a fabric cover that matches the couches using the covers from 2 pillows I stained and replaced. So for a shade over 25 thousand I wound up with a sweet isolation pad.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulpa /forum/post/20861679


What happens is when you have a sub that isn't isolated, it will turn the floor and walls into additional resonating surfaces. That gives the impression that the sub is more powerful (because more vibrations are heard/felt), but the vibrations are often a fraction of a second behind the main sub driver, in addition to rattling everything. Some describe this as "sloppy" bass.


Isolating the sub will reduce the extra vibrations, which makes the sub seem less powerful, but it also benefits by leaving just the bass from the driver, which results in the improved sound. And then you can adjust the gain on the sub to compensate for any power that seems to be lost.


Isolation pads often help reduce sound going to neighboring dwellings (although they don't completely eliminate them if you're driving hard enough), but the increase in sound quality alone is enough justification to using isolation to many people.

How do you know this to be a fact? Your explanation sounds like a very large leap of faith to me. The vibration of the floor adds significant sound?

I bet we all wish we had a sub that did that.


I'd like to see the double blind test results.
 

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It all depends on the resonant frequency of your floors and walls. At normal listening at most frequencies you'll have some shake but hit the resonant frequency and that's when it feels like an earthquake.


Also to the OP...first floor apartment? Check to see if you're on concrete. Most first floor apartments are and if that's the case I'd save my money. If you get one you'll effectively be decoupling a subwoofer from something that doesn't move anyway.
 
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