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Well, one solution is to go with an HDTV that uses technology not susceptible to burn-in, like DLP or D-ILA.


The lack of burn-in on modern computer monitors is not really owing to screen savers of any kind. The tubes simply don't burn in normal use at normal brightness, unless you leave the same image static on the screen for extremely long periods of time.


Unfortunately, the thing about CRT-based RPTV's is that they're running the picture tubes at much higher power than the typical computer monitor. That's why stuff burns into a projector faster than it does to a computer monitor. I think it's a lot to ask of a TV manufacturer to do signal processing on the image to find static scenes and do something to them in order to keep them from burning. I suspect it would be both expensive and error-prone.


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Mike Kobb

(Formerly "ReplayMike", but no longer affiliated with the company; these opinions are mine alone.)
 

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Better yet, maybe thats a feature that should be added to the video game itself for those with 16x9 tv's. It seems like that would be an easier solution.
 

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Well, having it on the video game console is one option. But a typical screen saver only works if the system has been idle for a certain amount of time. I'm proposing that someone invent a screen saver that works DURING gameplay, this would make it virtually impossible to inflict screen burn-in with no break in gameplay.


This wouldn't just apply to video games. Of course, I'm also talking about corner network logos (which exist on nearly every channel) which aren't as friendly as they used to be (they never go away!). Or any other kind of static image you can think of (even the blue screen on the VCR). This topic hasn't been focused on very much because "the common public" owns direct-view TVs and aren't affected by this dilemma.


I disagree with the comment that it would be expensive, we're talking about a piece of software that takes up very little disk space. If they can encode different languages into the TV (amongst dozens of other built-in features), certainly a screen saver isn't that far off from a proposable reality. They just need to try it and get some reactions from it to make it deemed more acceptable and improve on it over time (like anything else). "Go with direct-view instead" shouldn't be the only solution and I believe alternative solutions should begin development.


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My current entertainment setup:

Panasonic 27" TV, Toshiba SD-3109 DVD Player (connected via S-Video), Aiwa Dolby Pro Logic Mini-Surround System, Super NES, Nintendo 64, Sega Dreamcast, Sony PlayStation 2...(and more to come!)
 

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I tend to agree this isn't superhard. For a bare minimum, every set should have an orbiter, every set should have a "grey bars" only mode and every network should be forced -- by law if needed -- to move their damned logos around and also shut them off for some period of time.


Mark
 

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The more I think about buying an HDTV (next year), the more

I think about the aspect of it that I'm not looking forward to: not being able to play video games on it for extended periods of time without worrying about whether that energy bar on the top is going to be ingrained into my screen.


This is an issue that seems like it shouldn't even exist anymore on modern TV sets. Manufacturers need to create a screen saver that's built right into the set which can be set to "On" or "Off" (given the viewing situation), which will sense when pixels of the same color have been in the same spot for too long and overlap those pixels with various shades of grey.


I know this is a feature most of you would keep in the "Off" position, but when you play video games as much as I do, there needs to be some way of fighting this without simply turning it off. Screen burn-in is basically eliminated on modern computer monitors and screen savers only exist now for entertainment purposes. The one place left where screen burn-in still exists doesn't have a screen saver and I think that's pathetic.




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My current entertainment setup:

Panasonic 27" TV, Toshiba SD-3109 DVD Player (connected via S-Video), Aiwa Dolby Pro Logic Mini-Surround System, Super NES, Nintendo 64, Sega Dreamcast, Sony PlayStation 2...(and more to come!)
 
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