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I was about to buy speaker wires that come standard with transparent insulation, when jacketed cables for in-wall installation caught my eye. They look nicer and it should be easier to add things like end pants and braided sleeves.

 

But are they significantly less flexible than regular cables without jackets? If they are OK, what recommendations do you have? Monoprice seems all right if the jacket is not too rigid. Anything else?

 

Thanks.
 

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It's not stiff. It may be a little less flexible,but it's still flexible - it's meant to be run like any other wire so it needs flexibility.
 

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How many strands per conductor is what makes it flexible. My Honeywell Audacious 14 gauge in wall has 105 strands I believe. Very easy to work with.
 

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I am using Belden #10 wire for my speakers, and as it has over 100 strands it is quite flexible.


Even the #4 wire used on arc-welding equipment is very flexible due to many strands.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by audiosanity  /t/1523806/jacketed-speaker-wire-flexibility#post_24517321


I was about to buy speaker wires that come standard with transparent insulation, when jacketed cables for in-wall installation caught my eye. They look nicer and it should be easier to add things like end pants and braided sleeves.


But are they significantly less flexible than regular cables without jackets? If they are OK, what recommendations do you have? Monoprice seems all right if the jacket is not too rigid. Anything else?

Cable stiffness is a product of the rigidity of the actual conductive material and the rigidity of its jacket. Cable can be made more flexible by using more fine strands to obtain a desired amount of copper per foot for good conductivity. The jacket can be made more flexible by choice of insulating material which can be all over the map. Jacketed wire is going to tend to be little stiffer all other things being equal because of the jacket.


Heavy gauge solid wire is pretty unusable outside of inside walls and conduits which is where it is designed to be used. It wants to flex back into its previous shape. It gets ugly if you reroute it a few times.


Most stranded wire is limp enough that it will go where you put it and not flex back into a former shape, which is usually distressing and not aesthetic.


It all sounds the same, based on the amount of copper per foot.


I personally like using 12 or 14 gauge CL-rated cable for speaker cables because of its appearance and reasonable flexibility.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by arnyk  /t/1523806/jacketed-speaker-wire-flexibility#post_24522392


Cable stiffness is a product of the rigidity of the actual conductive material and the rigidity of its jacket. Cable can be made more flexible by using more fine strands to obtain a desired amount of copper per foot for good conductivity. The jacket can be made more flexible by choice of insulating material which can be all over the map. Jacketed wire is going to tend to be little stiffer all other things being equal because of the jacket.


Heavy gauge solid wire is pretty unusable outside of inside walls and conduits which is where it is designed to be used. It wants to flex back into its previous shape. It gets ugly if you reroute it a few times.


Most stranded wire is limp enough that it will go where you put it and not flex back into a former shape, which is usually distressing and not aesthetic.


It all sounds the same, based on the amount of copper per foot.


I personally like using 12 or 14 gauge CL-rated cable for speaker cables because of its appearance and reasonable flexibility.

Forgot to mention about the insulation.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skytrooper  /t/1523806/jacketed-speaker-wire-flexibility#post_24522681

Quote:
Originally Posted by arnyk  /t/1523806/jacketed-speaker-wire-flexibility#post_24522392


Cable stiffness is a product of the rigidity of the actual conductive material and the rigidity of its jacket. Cable can be made more flexible by using more fine strands to obtain a desired amount of copper per foot for good conductivity. The jacket can be made more flexible by choice of insulating material which can be all over the map. Jacketed wire is going to tend to be little stiffer all other things being equal because of the jacket.


Heavy gauge solid wire is pretty unusable outside of inside walls and conduits which is where it is designed to be used. It wants to flex back into its previous shape. It gets ugly if you reroute it a few times.


Most stranded wire is limp enough that it will go where you put it and not flex back into a former shape, which is usually distressing and not aesthetic.


It all sounds the same, based on the amount of copper per foot.


I personally like using 12 or 14 gauge CL-rated cable for speaker cables because of its appearance and reasonable flexibility.

Forgot to mention about the insulation.

Jacket = insulation
 
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