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Discussion Starter #1
So I read pages of reviews on these before deciding to order these. Got some new speakers in a new room and I'm excited!

The bass output is impressive on first listen for such a small speaker, however, something I didn't see anyone mention, is that at even just moderate volume levels, on pretty much any modern, professionally mixed movie, like Frozen 2 or some sucky Avengers movie, the ports on the bottom of the speakers make the most loud and awful and unacceptable noise on high dynamic range low frequency effects.

I've had monitors that cost 1/3rd of what these do that have not had this problem.

Is there anything to be done about this at all? How is no one talking about this? Stuffing the ports with socks removes the horrible sound but there is a dropoff in bass level. And stuffing $2000 speakers with socks just so they aren't embarrassingly bad while messing up the frequency response seems wrong.

Are these speakers meant exclusively to be used as PC speakers or something? Am I doing something wrong or missing something obvious? I have a JBL studio subwoofer but it's obviously localizable literally everywhere in the room so it's not really an option to filter out lower frequencies from the 7 series with the sub. Do I need to return these? Should I get the 8 inch KRK V8 for less money instead?
 

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They are movie monitors so should not handle frekvenze bellow 80hz they can go down to 40hz but loses spl compare to 80hz and will also sound bad.

So have the crossover at 80hz and let the sub handel rest.

Sent from my SM-G975F using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #3
They are movie monitors so should not handle frekvenze bellow 80hz they can go down to 40hz but loses spl compare to 80hz and will also sound bad.

So have the crossover at 80hz and let the sub handel rest.

Sent from my SM-G975F using Tapatalk
The subwoofer is localizable literally no matter where I put it though
 

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I use 708i's as surrounds and have never experienced something like this. I do crossover at 80hz though. I have heard these speakers full range with music and low end is impressive for such a small speaker but no audible noise from the port. What SPL is this happening at? You may be trying to play them too loud especially if you have the 705's but I have gone to reference with music with the 708i's without any issues. Also you may want to cutoff frequencies below ~30 hz since they drop of around there. Also try posting in the dedicated 7 series thread for more responses.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I use 708i's as surrounds and have never experienced something like this. I do crossover at 80hz though. I have heard these speakers full range with music and low end is impressive for such a small speaker but no audible noise from the port. What SPL is this happening at? You may be trying to play them too loud especially if you have the 705's but I have gone to reference with music with the 708i's without any issues. Also you may want to cutoff frequencies below ~30 hz since they drop of around there. Also try posting in the dedicated 7 series thread for more responses.
Thank you for your help!!

Yeah I didn't notice anything with any of the music I played but only in modern Hollywood movies.

Haven't measured with an SPL meter but I'm not playing them very loud at all.

Can you recommend me some settings for a custom low pass filter? I'm currently trying -12DB at 20hz with a Q of 16DB and it is helping tremendously with the horrible noise but I'd like to perfect it.
 

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For HT, you need a capable subwoofer and then cross these over at 70 or 80 hz and you will have no port noise. As Hoffman Iron law suggests, a speaker can have 2 out of these three characteristic...small, great bass, high sensitivity...but not all three. So unless the speaker is large or has low sensitivity, it will not have great bass.
 

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Thank you for your help!!

Yeah I didn't notice anything with any of the music I played but only in modern Hollywood movies.
Haven't measured with an SPL meter but I'm not playing them very loud at all.

Can you recommend me some settings for a custom low pass filter? I'm currently trying -12DB at 20hz with a Q of 16DB and it is helping tremendously with the horrible noise but I'd like to perfect it.
Seems like you may be experiencing "chuffing"...usually port noise below the speaker tuning frequency; I have heard this with ported subwoofers. The +/-3db frequency response on the low end is 45hz for the 708 and 48hz for the 705. With room gain would be lower but you would need to measure. You can start by cutting off anything below these values and I would expect you will no longer hear the port noise.
 

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You need to limit their response. LEt the sub do its job. If it cant replace it. I'm guessing your driving the speakers harder then designed for. Cross at 60-80Hz.
 

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This is where an AVR/AVP comes into play with bass management and DSP.
 
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Drive by posting. My two cents:

1) In a home theater setting, ALL main speakers should be high passed. Movies can have enormous amounts of low frequency information that is not present in any music. Even large full range speakers can be overdriven if not high passed. High passing for music is also wise, as it lowers the distortion the woofer puts out (which carries through to the midrange in a two way) as it is relieved of trying to produce lower bass at high output. Start with the default 80hz high pass for your speakers, likely 12db/oct, but 24db/oct if available.

2) If you are hearing and locating your subwoofer, you either 1) have it set way to high, and/or 2) do not have it crossed over correctly. You should be starting with a 80hz 24db/oct low pass on your subwoofer. If you are using a 12db/oct low pass, you will have localization problems.

3) If you post up full pictures of your room, speaker and sub locations, as well as the make and model of your receiver/processor, people can help walk you through placement options and the proper configuration. Just from the one picture you posted, I would likely pull your speaker out from the back and side wall a bit more and have a less aggressive toe in.

4) Start with your placement and implementing the above cross-overs, then adjust your sub level to get it close (a quick way by ear is adjust the level while listening to music to where it starts to to be clear the sub is there and back down just a bit). Now run your equalization and play with levels some more until you get everything dialed.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
You guys are amazing!

Could you please recommend me the simplest and cheapest room correction mic system thing for 2 powered speakers and a powered subwoofer? I've never done anything like this before so I need it to be simple and automated uwu

The JBL subwoofer has a baked in crossover of 80hz that I can't change. Not sure if that matters and will effect your recommendation c.c

How about the KRK Ergo?
 

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You guys are amazing!

Could you please recommend me the simplest and cheapest room correction mic system thing for 2 powered speakers and a powered subwoofer? I've never done anything like this before so I need it to be simple and automated uwu

The JBL subwoofer has a baked in crossover of 80hz that I can't change. Not sure if that matters and will effect your recommendation c.c

How about the KRK Ergo?
miniDSP, UMIK-1, REW.

https://www.minidsp.com/

https://www.roomeqwizard.com/
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Thanks for the link, hopefully this isn't a mistake, but I went ahead and ordered a second subwoofer. I plan on running stereo subs.

Regardless of what anyone says, at any crossover, at any volume, at any position in any of my rooms, my powerful brain localizes the subwoofer soooooooooooooo easily. I'm gonna put in the second sub next to the right speaker to hopefully solve that. Will it also improve frequency response?

What are your thoughts?
 

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Thanks for the link, hopefully this isn't a mistake, but I went ahead and ordered a second subwoofer. I plan on running stereo subs.

Regardless of what anyone says, at any crossover, at any volume, at any position in any of my rooms, my powerful brain localizes the subwoofer soooooooooooooo easily. I'm gonna put in the second so next to the right speaker to hopefully solve that. Will it also improve frequency response? What are your thoughts?

Dual subs (not stereo) should help smooth the response in the room and give you more output. Your speakers (the 705P's) are in corners, so that is affecting LF response. The walls are bare, the room look like it has lots of reflections. The 705's on the stands are not flush with the front of the stand so there is a bounce of of it's platform.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Dual subs (not stereo) should help smooth the response in the room and give you more output. Your speakers (the 705P's) are in corners, so that is affecting LF response. The walls are bare, the room look like it has lots of reflections. The 705's on the stands are not flush with the front of the stand so there is a bounce of of it's platform.
What is the difference between dual subs not stereo and stereo subs? I only know how to hook it up as stereo v.v
 

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What is the difference between dual subs not stereo and stereo subs? I only know how to hook it up as stereo.
It's a terminology/definition difference. Stereo means different signals sent to two separate speakers. Subs generally receive a mono signal and are thus considered dual mono.

Look up stereo vs mono recording and playback. A stereo recording may have guitars only in the right channel, lead vocal in both left and right channels and keyboards only in the left channel. A mono recording has everything mixed down to one channel and may be sent to one speaker or more for playback, it's still a mono recording. Mono playback would be only one speaker, two speakers playing back a mono recording is not stereo, it's dual mono. I was a recording engineer for 32 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
It's a terminology/definition difference. Stereo means different signals sent to two separate speakers. Subs generally receive a mono signal and are thus considered dual mono.

Look up stereo vs mono recording and playback. A stereo recording may have guitars only in the right channel, lead vocal in both left and right channels and keyboards only in the left channel. A mono recording has everything mixed down to one channel and may be sent to one speaker or more for playback, it's still a mono recording. Mono playback would be only one speaker, two speakers playing back a mono recording is not stereo, it's dual mono. I was a recording engineer for 32 years.
Is there anything wrong with feeding the left subwoofer the channel and the right subwoofer the right channel acting as a 2.0 system? That is my plan
 

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Is there anything wrong with feeding the left subwoofer the channel and the right subwoofer the right channel acting as a 2.0 system? That is my plan
Only if you want to continue to spend lots of money for poor sound.
Rex has given you very good advice.
 
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