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Are Triad and JTR speakers similar price to JBL and Infinity Reference?
Triad and JTR are quite a bit more expensive hand-made to order speakers. Their price range is fairly similar to each other, though Triad does have a more "budget" speaker lineup for small to mini rooms and systems (but still use high quality parts). They are crafted much better than JBL or Infinity speakers of what we are talking about here. Both brands are designed and made in the U.S.A. from very solid components and cabinetry.
 

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I have both. The 263 and the 580 in front /rear surrounds. There is not a whole lot of difference between them in my opinion. I cannot even say if I like one better than the other. I personally would not pay more for the 580s.
Thanks for your thoughts any reason you chose to use the 263 s as your fronts? What center do you use again?
 

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Well I'm still waiting on my rc263 center. I have a tiny jbl htib center currently. The 263s are in the front because they are taller and I think it looks better that way. I did try the 580s in front and I can't say I really noticed a significant difference. I am using a sub and they are crossed over at 80 hz so I cannot comment on lows.

I think I like the 580s more with music at over 85 dB but that is really loud for me. I will rarely listen at that volume.
 

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FINALLY, I am glad to to see someone, on what I consider the right track to a "proper" center channel for the 590's.The idea of placing a tower type Horn Tweeter speaker on it's side is just plain wrong. Would you ever actually consider buying a center channel speaker that had a Horizontal Dispersion of 80 or so degrees, an a Vertical Dispersion of about 120 degrees? I'm pretty sure that most people would be totally appalled by these specs.

My center, although not quite complete yet, is very similar to your idea. Mine started with the purchase of a heavily cabinet damaged 590 for $130 shipped. All driver components and crossover parts were unharmed. I next found a Klipsch RC-7 with damaged and blown woofers for $225 and sold the compression driver and horn for $100 and the crossover minus the terminal cup for $50.This left me with a nice cabinet and grill for $75.

Due to old age (71) and health reasons this project has never gotten quite finished. It just needs the Spacer/Adapters for the woofers to finished with my router. I also live in a high rise apartment, so the time of day that I can run loud power tools is limited.

The horn that I am using is a Pyle PH715. This horn can be best described as a "Tri-Radial" design. It seems to have about 90 degrees of Vertical Dispersion. Depending upon how you orient the horn it has 60 degrees on the top and 120 degrees bottom of Horizontal Dispersion. This is the way it was meant to be used for Small Club PA systems. I have chosen to mount it the other way for a shorter (8 ft) distance to MLP.

This horn is no longer available at PE but you can find the limited amount of specs on their site by searching 292-2576. The horn is 7.8 inches square. This horn should be available elsewhere if you look around.

By the way, it will require a screw on adapter. I got some very nice ones (ABS) from DIY Sound Group, but the Eminence ones (Aluminum) look very nice also.

Hope this helps; Jack
I did a A/B comparison of my JBL 590 center vertically and horizontally and I could not tell the difference. I don’t have a AT screen in my theater room. So I have to keep my center Horizontal. After using a 520 for six months and being unsatisfied, I sold it and got the 590. I have been using it horizontally for 2 years now and love it. I sit right in front of it so I don’t have these dispersion issues you are alluding to.
 

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Question for all. On carpet does everyone switch out the bottoms and use the spikes?

Or do you just keep the base rubber bottoms?

Pros and cons for each?
 

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Question for all. On carpet does everyone switch out the bottoms and use the spikes?

Or do you just keep the base rubber bottoms?

Pros and cons for each?
You should use the spikes to help decouple the speakers from the floor (usually helps with resonance and tightens bass response). The only issue will be that the spikes will need to be driven all the way to the subfloor for a substantial footing, leaving nice holes in the carpet and pad. There are speaker spike carpet "pucks" you can purchase that will only indent the carpet fibers, but allow the spikes to contact a small surface. Not quite as good a solution, but if you care about your carpet and possibly what the WAF will be, then try the pucks.
 

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You should use the spikes to help decouple the speakers from the floor (usually helps with resonance and tightens bass response). The only issue will be that the spikes will need to be driven all the way to the subfloor for a substantial footing, leaving nice holes in the carpet and pad. There are speaker spike carpet "pucks" you can purchase that will only indent the carpet fibers, but allow the spikes to contact a small surface. Not quite as good a solution, but if you care about your carpet and possibly what the WAF will be, then try the pucks.

Ok, its time for DF to ask a silly question. How does firmly attaching the speaker to the floor decouple it? I have my notepad at the ready!
 

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Ok, its time for DF to ask a silly question. How does firmly attaching the speaker to the floor decouple it? I have my notepad at the ready!
Funny guy. 😁 Using the spikes, you have only four tiny contact points rather than the entire base of the speaker resting on the carpet or floor. By making sure the spikes contact a solid surface, the speaker won't be as tipsy and prone to tipping over.
 

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Funny guy. 😁 Using the spikes, you have only four tiny contact points rather than the entire base of the speaker resting on the carpet or floor. By making sure the spikes contact a solid surface, the speaker won't be as tipsy and prone to tipping over.
In theory ,a piece of half inch foam from home depot ought to "decouple" every bit as well as spikes, but whadda i know..
 
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Funny guy. 😁 Using the spikes, you have only four tiny contact points rather than the entire base of the speaker resting on the carpet or floor. By making sure the spikes contact a solid surface, the speaker won't be as tipsy and prone to tipping over.
Thanks Dan, the notepad comment was meant to convey "you have my attention, and Im ready to learn". I also realized after hitting "post reply" that I had violated my own cardinal rule. Search first before asking silly questions.

The decoupling thing just seems backwards to me. Like putting a soft rubber vibration pad under something would be "decoupling" in my mind not firmly attaching it to the same surface.
 

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Thanks Dan, the notepad comment was meant to convey "you have my attention, and Im ready to learn". I also realized after hitting "post reply" that I had violated my own cardinal rule. Search first before asking silly questions.

The decoupling thing just seems backwards to me. Like putting a soft rubber vibration pad under something would be "decoupling" in my mind not firmly attaching it to the same surface.
The carpet and padding alone may make for a wobbly surface, but if the spikes are reliably touching a solid surface, the speaker is less apt to be a falling hazard, especially if it's a bookshelf on a stand or a heavy tower speaker.

I understand what you meant. Just poking fun.
 

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The smaller the contact point, the better the decoupling of the speaker body, lessening resonance transfer.
I am under the impression that half inch foam might eliminate 100% of contact with the floor...
once again , i might be wrong...
 

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The smaller the contact point, the better the decoupling of the speaker body, lessening resonance transfer.
Right. Ideally you could float the speakers in the air. But until we reach antigravity tech in the 24th century, the next best option is to rest them on 4 minuscule metal points.
 

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Speaker stability aside, the audio goal of spikes is to better couple the speaker to the floor while the goal of foam or rubber is to better decouple the speaker from the floor. The ultimate goal of both techniques is to reduce vibrations and resonances. So for example with a bare wooden floor that transmits vibrations when you walk on it it's best to decouple the speaker from it. With a more stable floor like concrete it makes more sense to couple to it. A wooden floor with carpeting is effectively more like a concrete floor in that the carpeting dampens floor vibrations so coupling to the wooden floor with spikes that penetrate the carpeting makes sense.
 

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Speaker stability aside, the audio goal of spikes is to better couple the speaker to the floor while the goal of foam or rubber is to better decouple the speaker from the floor. The ultimate goal of both techniques is to reduce vibrations and resonances. So for example with a bare wooden floor that transmits vibrations when you walk on it it's best to decouple the speaker from it. With a more stable floor like concrete it makes more sense to couple to it. A wooden floor with carpeting is effectively more like a concrete floor in that the carpeting dampens floor vibrations so coupling to the wooden floor with spikes that penetrate the carpeting makes sense.
The foam is damping and the spikes are decoupling. The goals are similar.
 

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The foam is damping and the spikes are decoupling. The goals are similar.
By definition coupling is to connect while decoupling is to disconnect. Solid spikes couple (connect) solid speakers to solid floors. Soft, damping materials like foam and rubber decouple (disconnect) solid speakers from solid floors. This is how speaker coupling and decoupling is defined by the audio industry.
 
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