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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is another tidbit from Jeff's e-mail I thought you guy's would find interesting. He attended a 90 minute course on "Fixed Pixel Video-Display Technologies by Michael Heiss, a consultant." and this is what he said:

Quote:
the next major leap in single chip DLP technology will likely reach the front projector market in 12 – 18 months from now. Specifically, the consultant was referring to the "spiral" (instead of the current segmented) color wheel. To read the anticipated benefits of this future DLP technology, see the Texas Instruments’ 6/7/2001 press release entitled "Texas Instruments announces enhanced

brightness, color saturation for DLPâ„¢ technology -- Sequential Color Recapture technology described at SID 2001 Conference", which can be read at http://www.dlp.com/dlp/resources/res...lts.asp?PR=173


The following is a brief excerpt from the press release: "Sequential Color Recapture - SCR - is a technology that allows all three colors to be present simultaneously, such that a single panel DLP system can now be as efficient as - potentially more efficient than - a three panel system, but without the additional parts, size, weight and expense of three panel systems."
HMMMM.......sounds promising http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif
 

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When referring to Jeff Stewart are you referring to the Stewart Screen family.


If so Don Stewart post here openly all the time.

It would be nice if Jeff would do the same.

It would also make his opinion more credible.


It would be nice to welcome him to the forum http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif


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Alan Gouger

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry Alan, I don't think he is related. It would be nice to have him as a member though because his report was very thorough and well thought out. Perhaps after he reads his words here he will want to join us http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif
 

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Thanks for passing on Jeff's comments, very informative.


While I was mostly fixated on my disappointment with the Sharp's blacks, I'll have to agree with his comments on color, as well.


It reminds me of the difference in color between sherbets and regular ice cream. The former are bright but "watery", lacking the rich, solid look of the latter.


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Noah
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just recieved an E-mail from Jeff Stewart with his report from Cedia. I decided to post his observations of the various projectors here. Keep in mind that he did not want me to post his E-mail address and is not a member of the Forum (although he reads it) so he will not be able to answer any of your questions.


Quote:
What I learned at the Exhibit Booths.


1.DLP Projectors


A. The Sim2 HT200DM and the Piano Plus


I went to CEDIA in search of DLP projectors that would give me the most "film-like theater viewing experience". With that standard of measurement in mind, and without regard to the specs, my favorite DLP projectors in order of preference were:


Sim2 (Selco) HT200DM


Plus Piano HE-3100.


The HT200DM had the best rendition of colors of all DLP projectors viewed. It had the most film-like experience. The warmth and fullness of the colors of the HT200DM were much better than any of the new 1280 x 720 DLP projectors (listed below), even better than Sim2’s new HT300. Whites were perceived as full white (even with the GrayHawk screen) and blacks were black. The red sweater on the girl was brilliant and warm in color and the green leaves on the trees were lush and realistic.


The Plus Piano had the next best color rendition and thus the second best film-like experience. While not quite as full and warm as the HT200DM, the colors were still far superior to the 1280 x 720 DLP projectors listed below. By superior, I mean that they were warmer and fuller. Skin tones were quite accurate, reds and blues were quite good. (Not much green on the mountain in the Vertical Limits

demo DVD.) I thought the picture suffered somewhat in a low-light scene inside an ice cave, but then I saw that the DWIN 1280 x 720 DLP below did not do any better with the low light scenes from the same DVD, and the DWIN unit colors were much flater and less vibrant than the Plus Piano.


While the colors of the Plus Piano were close, but not quite as good as the Sim2 HT200DM, I found that the picture appeared to be noticeably sharper on the Plus Piano than on the Sim2 HT200DM. I thought at first that it might be the viewing distance, but I at about 1.3 times the width of the screen (i.e., right next to the Plus Projector) when I viewed the Plus Piano. Still, I could have been sitting too

close to the screen when I viewed the Sim2 HT200DM. I do not have a good sense of how far back I was during that Sim2 viewing.


Here is what I know about these two projectors:


Plus Piano HE-3100


848 x 600 DLP chip; 450 ANSI lumens; 700:1 contrast ratio; six segment RGBRGB color wheel that runs at 240 mhz; manual focus; 1000 hour lamp; does not use the progressive scan of the DVD player and has its own onboard scaler and deinterlacer that looked very good with the demo (Vertical Limits DVD); not HD compatible but made as an entry-level home theater projector to watch DVDs; manual focus (no zoom); operates at 32db; 4.4 pounds with a footprint smaller than an 8x11 sheet of paper; list price $2;995; likely to be sold directly by Plus and only through a few dealers on a commission basis; I could not determine the throw ratio with certainty, but it appears to be about 1.3 or 1.35 times the width of the screen; a new model will be introduced in the fourth quarter of 2001 that will be

like the Piano, only brighter and HD compatible; in the first quarter of 2001 Plus intends to release its own version of the 1280 x 720 DLP chip projector; Piano Plus was shown on a floor mount 14 inches off the floor and the lenses was angled somewhat upward; if you turn it upside-down you can use a ceiling mount.


Demo screen used in exhibit booth: StudioTek 130; (40.5 x 72 -- 82 diag)


Demo feed: Vertical Limits DVD 480i converted by projector to 480p, with both high light and low light scenes.


Comment: If you are concerned whether 450 ANSI lumens is sufficient to create a good home movie theater experience, try running the foot-Lambert formula described elsewhere in this email to test different screen sizes to find the sweet spot.


Sim2 (Seleco) HT200DM


848 x 480 dual mode DLP chip; 600 lumens; 600: 1 contrast ratio; six segment RGBRGB color wheel that runs at 240 mhz; red segment is larger than green and blue; 6000 hour lamp; dust proof sealed optical engine (this feature is also in the Sim2 HT300 and will be in the Marantz described below); throw distance of 2.2 – 3.0 times screen width; noise level is not listed anywhere and when I asked the Sim2

representative, he balked and then said about 30db to 35db, which may mean that it is probably about 35db (your can hear it, but it is not bad); list price stated by the Sim2 demonstrator on Friday was $10,995 and list price stated by the Sim2 demonstrator on Saturday, when I went back for a second viewing, was $9,995.


Demo screen used in exhibit booth: Grayhawk (49 x 87 – 100 diag)


Demo feed: 480p DVD with lots of green leaves, red sweater and off-red cap, white eyes of actors, close-up of skin tones, all exceptional and with black blacks, but the picture looked less sharp than the other projectors viewed (including the Piano Plus).


B. 1280 x 720 DLP Projectors


I went to CEDIA expecting to find the crown jewel of "film-like theater viewing experience" somewhere among the new 1280 x 720 DLP projectors, but I did not. Yes, they were incredibly sharp, but many of them were showing 1080I input. Only DWIN was showing DVD 480p input (Vertical Limit, the same DVD as used by Plus). The colors were all cold and flat and lacked vibrancy.


The best way to explain it was is to borrow the comment made by an avforum member who once differentiated among colors by describing one set as being "Ektachrome" and the other set as being Kodachrome. For those who remember this Kodak slide film, the lower speed Kodachrome slides showed warm, full colors, with strong reds, greens, etc. The higher speed Ektachrome slides were colder and less vibrant with almost a blue hue to the slides.


I place the Sim2 HT200DM and the Piano Plus in the color category of "Kodachrome" and all of the 1280 x 720 DLP projectors in the color category of Ektachrome.


The 1280 x 720 DLP projectors that I viewed are as follows:


Sim2 HT300


Demo screen used: GrayHawk, 49 x 87, 100" diag.


Demo input: 1080 i converted by projector to 720p


List: $15,000


Marantz VP 12 S1


(I think I wrote down the right model numbers, but it was dark and I had trouble reading my notes later. Marantz did not have any written literature. Specs will be posted on their website in one month.)


Faroudja scaling and deinterlacing onboard.


1200:1 contrast ratio


700 ANSI lumens


very quite


no leakage of ambient light from projector.


sealed, dust-proof optical engine.


not nearly as big as the Sharp unit.


When asked, demonstrator said that lamp life was unknown at this time.


Demo screen used: GrayHawk, said the demonstrator, but I do not know the size.


Demo input: 1080 i converted by projector to 720p


List: $13,000


Comment: This was the best viewing of all the 1280 x 720 DLP projectors, and the specs shared by the demonstrator, if true in the final unit, were extraordinary.


Sharp XV-9000U


By now, everyone knows the specs.


Demo screen used: GrayHawk, 45 x 80 (92 diag)


Demo input: 1080 i converted by projector to 720p


DWIN Transvision 2


Outboard scaler, as in the past.


Aspect ratio recognition will determine whether DVD is anamorphic or letterbox.


Two lamp choices: 150W and 270W


Two zoom lens choices.


List expected to be $13,000 or less (said the demonstrator during the demonstration). Their unit buzzed like a bee overhead. Hopefully they will fix the db problem before its release. Release expected in very early 2002.


Demo screen used: not certain


Demo input: 480p DVD Vertical Limit; colors were much less warm, vibrant or accurate than the same DVD demo on the Plus Piano;picture was sharper than the Plus Piano, but the extra sharpness did not enhance the viewing experience of the DVD movie.


I thought that this was a very ballanced and thoughtful review of the various projectors at CEDIA and that all of you would be interested in his impressions. He also sent me information on Screens, Room acoustics and treatment,and theater seating


You can read about his observations of the new Kenwood DVD players in the thread on the DVD forum HERE .


I didn't include it all here because I didn't want to make this post too long.


Hope this is useful http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif




[This message has been edited by Free (edited 09-10-2001).]
 

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Noah I believe he is reffering to the DWIN in his assessment as he mentions 2 different lamps, and 2 different lenses which the DWIN has and the Sharp doesn't


Spero D.
 
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