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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1992 vintage Pioneer SX-201 and a 2002 Denon AVR-1802. I hooked them both up to my Polk Monitor 40s and Infinity SL50s. The only big difference between the two recievers is 30 more watts per channel in the Denon. The sound is night and day! I have to have the built in eq tweeked on the SX-201 just to get somewhat close. Kind of interesting. Sound is "better" with the Denon.
 

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Great. Stay with the Denon.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by karlsaudio /forum/post/18280760


I have a 1992 vintage Pioneer SX-201 and a 2002 Denon AVR-1802. I hooked them both up to my Polk Monitor 40s and Infinity SL50s. The only big difference between the two recievers is 30 more watts per channel in the Denon. The sound is night and day! I have to have the built in eq tweeked on the SX-201 just to get somewhat close. Kind of interesting. Sound is "better" with the Denon.

Thats like comparing a Lexus 350 to a Toyota Yaris..


The 201 was an entry-level stereo receiver that sold for double the power per channel of the 201 plus having more channels. The amplifiers within the entry-level stereo receivers of Pioneer were very weak in terms of output power..


Just my $0.01..
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Oh, I know. Just that I have heard people say all recievers sound the same. NOPE! And was just fun to see the difference. My SX-201 is being sent to outdoor music duty.
 

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I think the sentiment I've read here most often is that all AMPLIFIERS sound the same. Receivers and pre/pros are going to add their particular coloration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
OK. Makes sence.
 

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And performance can drift off badly over time as amps weaken and specs start to vary from original quality. If they were both new and driving the same set of workable speakers, while staying within their optimal operating conditions, and both set to precisely the same amplitude, you would be hard pressed to tell one from the other in double blind testing conditions.


In fact, to the best of my knowledge, no one has ever been able to do it.


Here is an excellent website that cuts through the baloney that the subjective audio websites preach:

http://www.theaudiocritic.com/plog/
 
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