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Manni,

Yes. I got mine on both my laptops. Upgraded on the one without the jvc autocal...now just started the other one that has the jvc autocal...too late I guess...if i get the chance to test i will advise. Calman/Chromapure seem to work fine.
 

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I just did the JVC autocalibration. First I did the environment setting than one "Quality" 33 point calibration with iris at -10. The colors look better and the picture is clearer, there was slight "haze" to it before the calibration. I have no clue what the calibration charts meant though, something I need to learn. I am new at this and will try some more calibrations and see if things can improve even more.
 

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Hi everyone,

I had to rerun the JVC Autrocal after 650 hours and I thought I'd update my findings in one post:

- Preparation:
1) A Datacolor Elite isn't necessary and can be as good, as bad or worse as any Pro unit. The only difference is software, and as we don't need the Datacolor software, it really doesn't matter. If you get a bad pro (when checking with a more reliable, ideally reference meter and another software like Calman or CP), just send it back for a replacement and get another one until you get a good one. I tried to get an Elite and it measured worse than the Pro. So save your $$$. The latest JVC models need the Spyder 4 Pro. I don't think the Spyder 3 is compatible with the latest version of the software.
2) After you've installed the Datacolor software to get the drivers for the Spyder meter, make sure the Datacolor utility isn't loaded in memory, it interacts with the JVC software. You only need to install the Datacolor software for the drivers. You don't even need to activate the software. Also make sure you don't have any IP remote running on an iPhone/iPad/android like iRule, as it will interfere too. Make sure for example that iRule isn't loaded in any of the devices connected to the network.
3) Make sure that the environment settings in the JVC menus are disabled. The JVC Autocal doesn't work if they are enabled.
4) Once the JVC software is running, especially once you've entered the calibration section, only use the software to control the PJ. If you use the remote, the changes you make with the remote won't be taken into account by the software which will lead to issues.

- Meter:
1) Unless you only want to autocal one user mode with specific settings, I suggest you set the iris fully open in the JVC and when positioning the driver, make sure that you put it as close to the PJ as possible, without getting outside of the "safety rectangle" shown by the software before calibration.

- Calibration:
1) If you want to create a custom gamut with the JVC software, for example a rec-709 one, or if using the filter on the higher models a DCI one, do so, load it into a custom gamut location, but note that this custom gamut can only be calibrated for color. Any gamma calibration will be ignored.

If you want to fully calibrate the projector, here is the process I recommend:

PHASE 1: Gamma calibration (and color calibration for first iris/CMD position):
0) In the settings, select gamma + color. Select how detailed you want the gamma calibration to be. I select High for 33 steps, as this only needs to be run ONCE.
1) Select a standard color profile, like standard or cinema, whichever you plan to use/want to calibrate. If you use user modes, this is the profile you will select in your user mode. But to calibrate, select it directly, don't select a user mode or a custom gamut.
2) Select gamma normal (all the gamma presets are calibrated, so better take the most standard one).
3) Select 6500K color temp (all the color temp presets are calibrated, so better select the most standard one).
4) Check that the iris is fully open (best position to calibrate gamma) and that CMD is off. Set filter to off as well unless you want to calibrate a DCI custom colour profile.
5) Run the calibration.
6) Once it's done, check that there is no - after either the gamma, color temp or gamut. This means this part of the calibration has been ignored and won't be corrected. Check that your gamma line is a straight line, that the color temp points are near D65. Gamut won't be properly corrected for most standard profiles, which is why you'll probably need to create a custom colour profile and calibrate it later. So you can ignore if gamut looks oversaturated. Most important at this stage is the gamma correction: the "after" line should be straight.
7) Save the calibration. Make sure that you save the backup file (with INIT in the name) in a safe place, as restoring that file is the only way to go back. A factory reset in the service menu Doesn't reverse the autocal changes. These changes are PERMANENT.

PHASE 2: Calibration of the various iris and CMD settings
Because the JVC Autocal only corrects one iris position range and CMD setting at a time, you need to either calibrate the settings you use, or be systematic and calibrate the whole range of AP value, with and without CMD if you use CMD.
0) Go to settings and deselect gamma. Gamma only needs to be run once.
1) Go back to calibrate, and as we selected iris fully open (0) and no CMD, go down the range without CMD and back up the range with CMD. The effective ranges are slightly different but I use 0, -5, -10 and -15 as they are easy to remember and cover all the positions that have to be calibrated. If you don't do that, when you change the iris settings the greyscale will be wrong.
2) As iris open (0) / no CMD was done in PHASE 1, I then select the following settings for Lens AP:
-5 and calibrate (the process is much faster as only colour is selected, it's the gamma that takes the longer, especially if 33 steps/high was selected). Then I save.
-10 (calibrate) (save)
-15 (calibrate) (save)
3) I then switch to CMD On, calibrate and save (without changing Lens AP)
4) Then I go back up the lens AP settings, keeping CMD On:
-10 (calibrate) (save)
-5 (same)
0 (same).

PHASE 3: color calibration for custom color profiles
Once you've done this, you have calibrated the standard color profile you had selected (say standard or cinema) for all lens AP settings, with or without CMD, for all gamma presets and all color temp presets.
Also, user modes using this standard colour profile will be calibrated too.
So, if you select user 1 with standard, a custom gamma using the 2.4 preset and a custom color temp using the 7000K preset, it will be calibrated.

However, what you need to do is run a color only calibration, just once, for each standard or custom color profile you use.

I suggest you select the lens AP and CMD setting you are most likely to use for extra accuracy with these settings, but you only need to do this once.

For example, say you have created a rec709 custom color profile and uploaded it to custom1, you simply have to select custom1 as the color profile and run the calibration.

If, in a user2 preset, you select custom1 colour profile, gamma 2.6 and color temp 6500K, it should be calibrated already due to the previous steps.

That's it!

From this baseline, I get near reference calibration for all my sources (all dEs under 2.8 with colorchecker SG, average dE under 1.5).
I use a BT1886 target gamma and only have to change the dark gamma control (2 notches) to get a near perfect BT1886 gamma curve.

If I then run a lightning LUT for MadVR with Calman, in 5-10 minutes (it only needs 65 points) I get a reference calibration for my HTPC with a max dE under 1.5 and an average dE under 1 for colorchecker SG. I double checked with a custom Colorchecker XXL with more than 1000 points and the whole cube is at reference level. With a 65 points / 5-10mn LUT, instead of the 17x17x17 (4913 points / 2-4 hours) that I needed with my old X30 to get results not as good).

I hope this helps. Please let me know if I got any of the former is wrong or if you experience a different behaviour, but that's what I observed when I redid my calibration.

The most important point is that trying to select a custom gamut would not allow to correct gamma. A standard color profile has to be selected for gamma to be corrected.
Thanks for the tips! I just recalibrated using your tips and got excellent results compared to factory settings and my first autocalibration attempt. The charts look better too!
 

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Just to confirm that the JVC Autocal software works fine in Windows 10 final (as well as Calman 5.5.2).

I have simply upgraded my 8.1 Pro x64 VM to Win 10 Pro, so not sure about fresh install or other versions, but I don't see why it shouldn't work.

Also, I can confirm that the JVC Autocal does a fantastic job at reclaiming lost brightness.

When I checked my calibration before redoing the JVC autocal at 950 hours, I was down to 32cd/m2 at -15 (from around 50cd/m2 at 100% white to D65 after my last calibration about 150 hours ago).

The gamma autocal simply corrects most of the droop, but doesn't reclaim any brightness.

It's when you do the color autocal (which corrects the RGB balance) that you reclaim all that lost brightness.

If I had not re-done the JVC Autocal, I would have had to open my iris up to -6 to get 14fL (50cd/m2).

After re-doing the JVC Autocal, I had got back to 54 cd/m2 at -15, after calibrating 100% white to D65 from the 6500K preset.

I checked my rec709 color preset and it had not moved at all, it was still 100% correct, so I didn't bother correcting it.

After my MadVR calibration (10mn with a Lightning LUT with Calman, only 65 points to get reference results, max dE of 1.56 on the Colorchecker SG, average dE of 0.48), I was able to get just over 50cd/m2 (almost 15fL) at 100% white with the iris closed down to -15.

This means that without the JVC Autocal, I had lost at 950 hours close to 50% brightness (I had over 60cdm2 with a new lamp at -15 with 100% white to D65).

After re-running the JVC autocal, I had lost less than 18%, which is almost nothing compared to just after my last JVC Autocal (I think I was around 15%).

So if you want to reclaim your lost brightness, do not hesitate to run the Autocal, even if your calibration doesn't look too off.

Literally Day & Night. And that's not something an external VP can do anything about.

This Spyder 4 Pro was the best investment I made for my X500 projector :).
 

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Also, I can confirm that the JVC Autocal does a fantastic job at reclaiming lost brightness.
Not doubting you, but how does that work? I mean what change does it make? I'm wondering if this is something I could do with a i1D3 and my Lumagen, or if I should hunt down a Spyder 4...
 

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Not doubting you, but how does that work? I mean what change does it make? I'm wondering if this is something I could do with a i1D3 and my Lumagen, or if I should hunt down a Spyder 4...

This only works with the JVC Autocal, as it's the internal corrections which are changed.

An external VP can give a correct calibration, but cannot restore the brightness.

For example, before re-running the Autocal, I had to set my RGB gains (red and green) lower than -15 to set 100% white to D65 (I don't run the JVC Autocal everytime I calibrate, so I had gradually lost light setting the gains to set 100% white to D65, which I do every 100 hours or so, my last JVC Autocal was done about 650 hours ago I think).

After the JVC Autocal, I only had to set them to like -4/5, from the same preset. This is how it works. The baseline (6500K preset) is more correct, so you lose less light when you set 100% white to D65.

If I had done a JVC autocal every time I calibrated the projector, I guess I wouldn't have lost that much light to start with, because I wouldn't have accumulated gradually so much correction on the gains.

Well, that's the way I explain it, I might be completely wrong.

By the way, I checked if it makes a difference after the JVC Autocal to set 100% white to D65 from 7000K (lowering blue and green) or 6500K (lowering green and blue), and I get roughly the same brightness (around 54cd/m2 before my 3D LUT calibration) so not a factor in this.

Would love to hear if anyone else is getting similar results!
 

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For example, before re-running the Autocal, I had to set my RGB gains (red and green) lower than -15 to set 100% white to D65 (I don't run the JVC Autocal everytime I calibrate, so I had gradually lost light setting the gains to set 100% white to D65, which I do every 100 hours or so, my last JVC Autocal was done about 650 hours ago I think).

After the JVC Autocal, I only had to set them to like -4/5, from the same preset. This is how it works. The baseline (6500K preset) is more correct, so you lose less light when you set 100% white to D65.
I'll buy that, though I've got to ask, this isn't a case of "user error" is it? What I mean is, it's not a case where you just kept dropping gains instead of "releveling" them at a higher setting is it?
 

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I'll buy that, though I've got to ask, this isn't a case of "user error" is it? What I mean is, it's not a case where you just kept dropping gains instead of "releveling" them at a higher setting is it?
I don't see how this could be user error as I never drop more than two out of three. It would be if I was dropping three colors.

I've only been calibrating JVCs for 7 years, so I'm not that experienced in getting the most of them.

If you don't have to lower your RGB gains much to set 100% white to D65, then the Autocal won't give you anything back.

Feel free to wait for more feedback though, YYMV :)
 

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I don't see how this could be user error as I never drop more than two out of three. It would be if I was dropping three colors.
I was just wondering if it was something like:
1st cal, red's low - drop blue/green
2nd cal, blue's low - drop red/green
3rd cal, green's low - drop red blue
=Net, red/blue/green have all be dropped

I've only been calibrating JVCs for 7 years, so I'm not that experienced in getting the most of them.
And I've only calibrated mine twice, so I mean absolutely no offense, I'm just trying to understand. Most of my experience is with DLPs and they have all needed very, very little calibration work over their life, but when I have done calibrations, I've generally never had to all three gains below 100%, but maybe that's what you're saying and I was just interpreting it wrong.

Just trying to understand so I better know what I'm doing and what to watch out for going forward with my 4910.
 

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Just to confirm that the JVC Autocal software works fine in Windows 10 final (as well as Calman 5.5.2).

I have simply upgraded my 8.1 Pro x64 VM to Win 10 Pro, so not sure about fresh install or other versions, but I don't see why it shouldn't work.

Also, I can confirm that the JVC Autocal does a fantastic job at reclaiming lost brightness.

When I checked my calibration before redoing the JVC autocal at 950 hours, I was down to 32cd/m2 at -15 (from around 50cd/m2 at 100% white to D65 after my last calibration about 150 hours ago).

The gamma autocal simply corrects most of the droop, but doesn't reclaim any brightness.

It's when you do the color autocal (which corrects the RGB balance) that you reclaim all that lost brightness.

If I had not re-done the JVC Autocal, I would have had to open my iris up to -6 to get 14fL (50cd/m2).

After re-doing the JVC Autocal, I had got back to 54 cd/m2 at -15, after calibrating 100% white to D65 from the 6500K preset.

I checked my rec709 color preset and it had not moved at all, it was still 100% correct, so I didn't bother correcting it.

After my MadVR calibration (10mn with a Lightning LUT with Calman, only 65 points to get reference results, max dE of 1.56 on the Colorchecker SG, average dE of 0.48), I was able to get just over 50cd/m2 (almost 15fL) at 100% white with the iris closed down to -15.

This means that without the JVC Autocal, I had lost at 950 hours close to 50% brightness (I had over 60cdm2 with a new lamp at -15 with 100% white to D65).

After re-running the JVC autocal, I had lost less than 18%, which is almost nothing compared to just after my last JVC Autocal (I think I was around 15%).

So if you want to reclaim your lost brightness, do not hesitate to run the Autocal, even if your calibration doesn't look too off.

Literally Day & Night. And that's not something an external VP can do anything about.

This Spyder 4 Pro was the best investment I made for my X500 projector :).
Thanks for confirming that all works in Win10. Great that it helps get brightness back. Once I get the chance i will report back.
 

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I was just wondering if it was something like:
1st cal, red's low - drop blue/green
2nd cal, blue's low - drop red/green
3rd cal, green's low - drop red blue
=Net, red/blue/green have all be dropped

And I've only calibrated mine twice, so I mean absolutely no offense, I'm just trying to understand. Most of my experience is with DLPs and they have all needed very, very little calibration work over their life, but when I have done calibrations, I've generally never had to all three gains below 100%, but maybe that's what you're saying and I was just interpreting it wrong.

Just trying to understand so I better know what I'm doing and what to watch out for going forward with my 4910.
Yes, you are reading it wrong :)

I never drop more than two RGB colors, or that would unnecessarily cut brightness.

So even if I recalibrate, there are always only two gain channels which are cut. As I was using a 6500K preset, red and green were down more than 15 ticks (after 2/3 intermediary 100% white calibration since the last JVC Autocal at 650 hours).

After the last JVC autocal, I was able to set white to D65 from the same 6500K preset, recalibrated by the JVC autocal, and only had to lower R+G by 4/5 ticks to set 100% white to D65. Hence the brightness gain compared to before the autocal.

If you don't need to lower any RGB channel more than 5 ticks to set 100% white to D65, the Autocal wont' give you anything re brightness.

But if you do in your current calibration, then running the JVC Autocal will likely help regain some of this lost brightness.

I'm not making any promises, just reporting something I've noticed a few times, but this time it was crystal clear.

Safer to wait for other reports before buying a Spyder 4 Pro for that reason only, as it might be on my unit only.
 

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Yes, you are reading it wrong :)

I never drop more than two RGB colors, or that would unnecessarily cut brightness.

So even if I recalibrate, there are always only two gain channels which are cut. As I was using a 6500K preset, red and green were down more than 15 ticks (after 2/3 intermediary 100% white calibration since the last JVC Autocal at 650 hours).

After the last JVC autocal, I was able to set white to D65 from the same 6500K preset, recalibrated by the JVC autocal, and only had to lower R+G by 4/5 ticks to set 100% white to D65. Hence the brightness gain compared to before the autocal.
Got it. I wonder what's going on under the hood. But yeah, I'm not going to run out and buy anything until I notice that I'm having to do "drastic" adjustments to my gains.
 

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Got it. I wonder what's going on under the hood. But yeah, I'm not going to run out and buy anything until I notice that I'm having to do "drastic" adjustments to my gains.
Another way to look at it is if you haven't lost more than 15-20% brightness by the 1000 hour mark on the bulb, then the Autocal is unlikely to regain much brightness as this is a very decent drop for a JVC.
 

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Safer to wait for other reports before buying a Spyder 4 Pro for that reason only, as it might be on my unit only.
True...in the past you've reported gains in brightness that I didn't get trying similar adjustments on my own X500.

I know that changing the colour gamut does make differences to brightness though, but with the Lumagen the best option seems to be to use colour profile 'OFF' to give the most linear pre calibration results (at least in my case). Therefore I'm not likely to gain anything in brightness terms as I'm running on the full gamut anyway. Having said that I seem to have lost very little light output though I'm only at around 300 hours IIRC.
 

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True...in the past you've reported gains in brightness that I didn't get trying similar adjustments on my own X500.

I know that changing the colour gamut does make differences to brightness though, but with the Lumagen the best option seems to be to use colour profile 'OFF' to give the most linear pre calibration results (at least in my case). Therefore I'm not likely to gain anything in brightness terms as I'm running on the full gamut anyway. Having said that I seem to have lost very little light output though I'm only at around 300 hours IIRC.
Hi Kelvin,

The brightness gain has nothing to do with the gamut as it comes from setting 100% to D65.

Using high bright is fine if you can use an external VP with all your sources, and if you don't mind losing features like clear black - which produces an effect similar to a Darbee - but it's not an option for those of us relying on the PJ to deliver a calibrated picture without an external VP.

Even using high bright, you still have to set 100% white to D65 before using the lumagen. If you have to lower the gains significantly to reach D65, then the JVC Autocal will bring some brightness back.

I had no significant brightness loss until 500 hours, so you have a few months ahead of you before having to worry about that :).

Of course I could have won the JVC lottery and have the only magic unit with a bulb that can be reset, but I somehow doubt it :).
 

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One last thing regarding linearity, here is the gamut I get when I create a custom rec-709 colour profile and calibrate it using the JVC Autocal. This is with NO external correction.

As you can see, it's difficult to get more linear than that (this is from my last JVC Autocal at 650 hours, I didn't touch it today because I couldn't see the point).

In my experience, profile off is fairly linear but as it's completely oversaturated it's only usable with an external correction, so not an option for users who need sources which aren't corrected by an external VP/3D LUT.


It's because I get a calibration so close to reference from the JVC Autocal that I only have to do a 65 points Lightning LUT with Calman, which takes 10mn when I set the discus in its most accurate mode (5mn otherwise) vs at least two hours to get a decent 3D LUT from either Calman or Lightspace otherwise (with the Discus trained to the i1pro2).

There must be some unit to unit difference between our X500s (or between our Spyder 4 Pros) because we seem to get a very different behaviour.
 

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I'm not bothered about clear black...put up the black level flashing bars from the AVS HD disc and see the white lines that appear round the edges of the bars. ;) I don't think it's like Darbee in this regard (Darbee seems a little more intelligent, though I leave mine off or very low anyway).

I know you say that you get very linear results, but this latest revelation seems a bit odd IMHO. If it isn't related to colour gamut (which I have seen affect peak white depending which profile I use and then correct the RGB gains to D65 @100%), then I really can't see how it can 'magic up' extra brightness. I suspect there is something else at play, but hard to know quite what: I've tried various colour temp settings as a 'base' but in every case once adjusted back to D65 @100 (just using the gains of course) I end up at the same peak white.

The JVC autocal should still leave each RGB panel clipping at the same point and the overall colour temp of the lamp itself will be controlled by the balance of those same RGB panels. You are then just trimming the colour temperature by (usually) reducing green and blue to balance out the (usually) lower red output of the lamp.

Perhaps I'm not elucidating this very well, but to put it another way my previous X35 was at 650 hours and had barely lost any light output compared to new (less than 10% for sure) once calibrated at 100%. I couldn't get any more brightness at 100% no matter how I tweaked the RGB controls or what 'base' I used (except as above changing the colour profile did reduce light output in some cases). Of course it still suffered the same gamma drop as the X500 does, but with no autocal to correct (though better internal controls to correct with).

I'd want to see some more feedback from other users before concluding that you can gain such huge brightness output. Perhaps another way of looking at it is that you've just been able to set it up properly and maintain the output that I suspect I would still have anyway? If X500 lost 50% light output after 1000 hours then I think we'd have heard more about it.
 
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