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Okay I'm getting ticked because this is really crazy just to load color profiles that should've came with the PJ. For some reason i can't get my labtop connected to my PJ using land cable. Not sure what IP Address to use. I'm completely loss.
Did you turn off wireless connection on your pc?

I prefer to connect the projector to my router via a Ethernet cable. Good luck.
 

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Did you turn off wireless connection on your pc?

I prefer to connect the projector to my router via a Ethernet cable. Good luck.
I was using my lab top but no I didn't turn it off.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
 

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Why would a projector cut luminance for large screen size? I would have though the opposite, it should increase the luminance to compensate for a larger screen (in theory that is).
The autocal's top priority is to get RGB x,y coordinates as close to their x,y standards (e.g. rec709) coordinates as possible ... they do that, in part, by sacrificing luminance. Autocal pgms cannot add luminance because they start at 100% max luminance ... the only way to go is down in value. For example, Autocal programs start off by first measuring 100% amplitude/signal_intensity white (in nits) and 0% amplitude/signal_intensity black (in nits). These are absolute values (in nits). Then these absolute values (nits) are then normalized to percentages … so 120 nits for the brightest white = 100% luminance and 0.05 nits for the darkest black = 0% luminance in a relative luminance based Color Management System. The reason why autocal pgms are "relative luminance (0 to 100%)" based system is so they can subtract absolute luminance (nits) ... then redefine its 100% white luminance to be these lower values of luminance, as needed, to make the color x,y as accurate as possible.

Luminance can be increased, though, as a side effect in situations where the RGB primary x,y coordinates have drifted towards white (D65) significantly over time … in this case, hue and saturation ctrls for each RGB primary can put the primaries back to their "standards (e.g. rec709) coordinates" … without subtracting lumiance. Because R,G and B have increased in sat value (they are further away from D65 Wht), the rec709 luminance equation Y=0.72G + 0.21G + 0.07B will result in more luminance.

There are more sophisticated auto cal programs (profile run plus Light Space Color Conversion Pgm) which gives one choices to either sacrifice luminance for color accuracy or sacrifice color for luminance accuracy. Don’t forget, color space is a 3D environment. x, y for colors and Y=luminance. The 2K (e.g. rec709) stds do not require dEs for luminance/amplitude, just x,y colors. That point has been debated between Chromapure and Spectral for many years. :)
 

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The autocal's top priority is to get RGB x,y coordinates as close to their x,y standards (e.g. rec709) coordinates as possible ... they do that, in part, by sacrificing luminance. Autocal pgms cannot add luminance because they start at 100% max luminance ... the only way to go is down in value. For example, Autocal programs start off by first measuring 100% amplitude/signal_intensity white (in nits) and 0% amplitude/signal_intensity black (in nits). These are absolute values (in nits). Then these absolute values (nits) are then normalized to percentages … so 120 nits for the brightest white = 100% luminance and 0.05 nits for the darkest black = 0% luminance in a relative luminance based Color Management System. The reason why autocal pgms are "relative luminance (0 to 100%)" based system is so they can subtract absolute luminance (nits) ... then redefine its 100% white luminance to be these lower values of luminance, as needed, to make the color x,y as accurate as possible.

Luminance can be increased, though, as a side effect in situations where the RGB primary x,y coordinates have drifted towards white (D65) significantly over time … in this case, hue and saturation ctrls for each RGB primary can put the primaries back to their "standards (e.g. rec709) coordinates" … without subtracting lumiance. Because R,G and B have increased in sat value (they are further away from D65 Wht), the rec709 luminance equation Y=0.72G + 0.21G + 0.07B will result in more luminance.

There are more sophisticated auto cal programs (profile run plus Light Space Color Conversion Pgm) which gives one choices to either sacrifice luminance for color accuracy or sacrifice color for luminance accuracy. Don’t forget, color space is a 3D environment. x, y for colors and y=luminance. The 2K (e.g. rec709) stds do not require dEs for luminance/amplitude, just x,y colors. That point has been debated between Chromapure and Spectral for many years. :)
Thank you very much for this detailed explanation. However, I still don't understand the relation of luminance to the screen size that you put in the settings. I know you said that it is only your suspicion, but I'd be curious as to what is the logic behind it.

And since you mentioned Spectracal, Calman doesn't support autocalibrations of our projectors, right?
 

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Thank you very much for this detailed explanation. However, I still don't understand the relation of luminance to the screen size that you put in the settings. I know you said that it is only your suspicion, but I'd be curious as to what is the logic behind it.

And since you mentioned Spectracal, Calman doesn't support autocalibrations of our projectors, right?


Any time a autocal program asks for information, at best it will result in "no" change in luminance to maintain color accuracy... at worse, luminance is reduced by an amount proportional to what one entered as a response inorder to maintain color accuracy. Autocal can never increase luminance because autocal starts with the max luminance available ... because that's how most autocal pgms work. Autocal's primary focus is on color accuracy, not luminance accuracy ... because it is not required by relative luminance stds (e.g. rec709), and that color accuracy will be maintained, at the expense of luminance, depending on one's response. Since I do not know what the repercussions are of entering a larger or smaller number in the screen size field in JVC autocal settings, I deliberately pick 60" ... because I know that the brightest picture size is when one zooms out until one gets the smallest "image size" possible and the smallest image/scrn size is 60" in the JVC autocal pgm. I've done exhaustive luminance analysis of the RS600 and I know certain controls (like scrn adjust 073, cmd, enhance) will reduce luminance. Zoom_Out (smaller image size) can increase calibrated luminance. Why the paranoia about absolute luminance?: HDR. Hence, my gut feeling about scrn size.


Both Chromapure and CalMAN support a generic autocal ... with a video processor such as Lumagine Mini3 or DVDO Duo. If one had these external video processors, then one could auto-calibrate a JVC projector. However, this generic autocal does not modify JVC's internal calibration controls ... these JVC internal controls are only accessible today through JVC's autocal. Years ago, calMAN had an arrangement with JVC to access these internal controls ... that is no longer the case. I don't follow that calMAN thread so you'll have to get more info from guys who have "relentless Hope" that this will happen some day. I would learn how to use JVC autocal and use custom gamuts and gammas to overcome the stability and color accuracy issues of the Spyder probe ... that's not a bad hobby to have. Good luck. :)
 

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I was using my lab top but no I didn't turn it off.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk


I assume you've read this or a newer version 7 document pgs 19-21 for pc to jvc ntwk setup: http://www3.jvckenwood.com/english/download/file/JVC_PCS_manual6_en_v1_00.pdf


The first post in manni01's thread on JVC autocal (that's this thread) under "useful links" ... it has all the links, including using JVC autocal for custom gamut uploads BT.2020: http://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-di...000-x5000-rs400-rs500-rs600.html#post39729042
 

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I assume you've read this or a newer version 7 document pgs 19-21 for pc to jvc ntwk setup: http://www3.jvckenwood.com/english/download/file/JVC_PCS_manual6_en_v1_00.pdf


The first post in manni01's thread on JVC autocal (that's this thread) under "useful links" ... it has all the links, including using JVC autocal for custom gamut uploads BT.2020: http://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-di...000-x5000-rs400-rs500-rs600.html#post39729042

Okay here what I'm trying to do I'm using my lab top with windows 10 with Land cable coming from my JVC to the Lab top. Can i use this setup so far ?
 
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Okay here what I'm trying to do I'm using my lab top with windows 10 with Land cable coming from my JVC to the Lab top. Can i use this setup so far ?
Yes it is possible, but it can be a little tricky to set up. From what I recall it is describe in the JVC manual. You need to get your TCP/IP settings on your laptop to work with the Network settings in the JVC menu (or I should say you need to set the JVC network settings so they work with what you have set on your laptop). The far easier way is to plug both the JVC and laptop into a hub which is also plugged into your main router (or another hub). That can be hard to do tho since often times the JVC will not be conveniently located near a Ethernet port.
 

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I have long read here that CMD is a factor that affects the gamma tables, so if you have lamp x, and color profile x and CMD ON, that's different than the same thing but with CMD low and with CMD high.

In my testing that seems to indeed be the case. However CMD low/high seem to share the same gamma table. So for instance if you do lamp low, color profile standard, CMD ON, that's one gamma table. And the same thing with CMD LOW is a different gamma table. BUT with CMD high that is the same gamma table as CMD LOW. So it therefore is only necessary to run one gamma+color for whatever combination with CMD low, and again for the same combination but with CMD low *or* high. And you do not need to run a separate one when you go from low to high or vice-versa. Have others found this to be the case as well? I only bring it up as a point of clarification and understanding. Because I may have missed it earlier but it seemed like CMD was talked about as having 3 states off/low/high and to me it seems its really two states - CMD ON versus CMD LOW/HIGH.
 

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I have long read here that CMD is a factor that affects the gamma tables, so if you have lamp x, and color profile x and CMD ON, that's different than the same thing but with CMD low and with CMD high.

In my testing that seems to indeed be the case. However CMD low/high seem to share the same gamma table. So for instance if you do lamp low, color profile standard, CMD ON, that's one gamma table. And the same thing with CMD LOW is a different gamma table. BUT with CMD high that is the same gamma table as CMD LOW. So it therefore is only necessary to run one gamma+color for whatever combination with CMD low, and again for the same combination but with CMD low *or* high. And you do not need to run a separate one when you go from low to high or vice-versa. Have others found this to be the case as well? I only bring it up as a point of clarification and understanding. Because I may have missed it earlier but it seemed like CMD was talked about as having 3 states off/low/high and to me it seems its really two states - CMD ON versus CMD LOW/HIGH.


It's possible that CMD low, high and off will produce slightly different gammas because CMD low and high will take away varying amounts of luminance to maintain color accuracy. Any feature ( zoom, enhance, filter, LA [0,-4,-8.-12], CMD, Lamp, ...) which affects luminance to work can/will affect gamma accuracy in autocal ... problem is one can only run Gamma Auto Cal once ... and it will be the most accurate under the combo it was run under. All the other auto produced gammas will/can be slightly less accurate when different elements in the combo are used ... it's a trade off where one has to decide which combo will have highest priority. If Gamma Autocal is run again for a second or third time, it will wipe out all the other gammas that were auto produced from the previous Gamma Autocals and auto produce new gammas ... and gamma will be most accurate under the new combo it was run under.


If one analyzes what patches are used in a Gamma AutoCal, it uses 3 patches (called an RGB triplet) associated with each grey patch. Those are the patches necessary to create gamma with some fancy math. So if one is running a highly accurate gamma (33 measuring points), it takes 33 grayscale patches, 33 associated Red patches, 33 associated Grn patches and 33 associated Blue patches ... wht and blk, too. After its done, that 75KB file takes a long time to upload into the JVC projector because of all the auto produced gammas that are created ... as opposed to uploading a "Color" Autocal 75KB file which takes very little time to do so.


If one analyzes what patches are used in a "Color" Autocal, it's just a small number of gray scale patches with the primaries and wht/blk for calibration. It runs a verification sequence of primaries and secondaries with gray scale ... nothing to do with gamma ... probably does color temperature calibration, but it needs gamma to be really accurate for color temperature to be accurate ... remember, gamma is only really accurate with the combo Gamma Autocal was run under. If one is getting bad color temperature results from "color" autocal ... one reason is due to a change in the combo settings that were used for the Gamma Autocal ... that change in combo settings will distort gamma slightly. I know this because I ran Gamma Autocal every time Lamp or CMD or Filter was changed ... just to see what happened ... all the color temps were perfect or near perfect ... problem is one can only run Gamma Autocal once ... so priorities have to be made to which combo to use.


Correction: Gamma Autocals do have memory storage locations for different CMD, Filter and Lamp modes. See: http://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-di...-x5000-rs400-rs500-rs600-37.html#post48179241
 

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I thought different memory banks/areas are being used for Gamma when AutoCal is run in regards to CMD/Filter/Lamp mode.
A "master" Gamma, or low-level Gamma, is being used after the AutoCal in each respective mode and all other Gamma's are being calculated by this Gamma.

So, if I run AutoCal for Gamma "Standard" on CMD low, low lamp and no filter, than all other Gamma's for this setup are also being calculated by this Gamma. if I chose a Gamma of 2.4 afterwards, than this Gamma is calibrated in the above mentioned config.
If I change e.g. lamp mode to high, than different memory banks/areas are being used. Therefore I need to re-run Gamma AutoCal.
But they should not affect each other.
 

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I thought different memory banks/areas are being used for Gamma when AutoCal is run in regards to CMD/Filter/Lamp mode.
A "master" Gamma, or low-level Gamma, is being used after the AutoCal in each respective mode and all other Gamma's are being calculated by this Gamma.

So, if I run AutoCal for Gamma "Standard" on CMD low, low lamp and no filter, than all other Gamma's for this setup are also being calculated by this Gamma. if I chose a Gamma of 2.4 afterwards, than this Gamma is calibrated in the above mentioned config.
If I change e.g. lamp mode to high, than different memory banks/areas are being used. Therefore I need to re-run Gamma AutoCal.
But they should not affect each other.


That's not my understanding. Manni01 stated Gamma Autocal needed to be only run once for a full JVC autocal. Some times afterwards, manni01 changed his recommendation to use just several user modes and calibrate just what was needed for the next 200 hrs ... otherwise, running full autocals every 200 hrs would require spending more time calibrating than watching movies. In that multiple user mode example, he runs Gamma Autocal several times ... once each for several user modes. Every time a Gamma Autocal is run, new auto produce gammas are generated and that affects everything. The only time one can "localize" a change is by running just "Color" autocal. Then lamp, CMD, filter and LA (0,-4,-8.-12) can be stored locally ... but all those "localized" chgs with Color Autocal is still being controlled by the lastest Gamma Autocal and its combo setup. For example, if one runs Gamma Autocal with CMD=High, that base gamma will auto produce all other gammas with CMD=High factored in. So when one is about to run a Color Autocal with a combo that has CMD=off, then that Color Autocal will be calculated with a gamma that had CMD=High ... making the resulting JVC verification Gamma looking brighter. A brighter gamma is when the gamma is curved and slightly above the 45 degree angle gamma line. I've seen this happen many times. These changes are slight, but if one is wondering why JVC auto produced gammas and color temperature verification results are looking off after running a Color Autocal, this would explain one reason why.


The good news is color temp and gamma can be fine tuned post autocal by color profile. That's why some suggest that autocal gets one 80% there, but it's an important 80%. :)


Correction: Gamma Autocals do have memory storage locations for different CMD, Filter and Lamp modes. See: http://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-di...-x5000-rs400-rs500-rs600-37.html#post48179241
 

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I've searched high & cannot find an answer. Will the JVC Calibration Softwarework with my X-Rite i1 display Pro? I'm looking to purchase an DLA-RS500.
 

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I don't think the i1 is supported. So far only Spyders 4 and 5
Correct - Ver. 6 JVC software with the Spyder 4 and Ver. 7 software with the Spyder 5. No support for i1 products at this point.
Rats! Thanks guys. I purchased the i1 Display Pro for CalMan 5 Software & was hoping it would work.
 

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Rats! Thanks guys. I purchased the i1 Display Pro for CalMan 5 Software & was hoping it would work.
Actually, that's a good thing! Once you run the JVC autocal, you can use the i1 pro (provided it has been profiled to a reference spectro) to fine tune the results by adjusting 100% white. And if you have a video processor such as a DVDO or lumagen, together with calman you can do a quick 125 point 3D LUT for even better result. Either way you are in a good place.
 

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Okay here what I'm trying to do I'm using my lab top with windows 10 with Land cable coming from my JVC to the Lab top. Can i use this setup so far ?
Make sure the program that came with your Spyder is not running the background. As Manni01 mentioned--you only need the drivers, which the software installed.

I use my laptop with Windows 7 Pro connected via a regular LAN cable PLUS a short 6" crossover cable. It's similar to this:
https://www.amazon.com/CableCreatio...478827760&sr=8-5&keywords=crossover+lan+cable

If you can't get your laptop to recognize the PJ, try a crossover.

hth, Ron
 
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