AVS Forum banner

1161 - 1180 of 4389 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,856 Posts
I can't find a specific one where Manni01 provides a step-by step approach to the newest v7 software; is this v6 thread his most recent?
The thread is for v6/7. V6 is for Spyder4, v7 for Spyder5. There are no other significant differences between them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,800 Posts
The thread is for v6/7. V6 is for Spyder4, v7 for Spyder5. There are no other significant differences between them.
Well, I guess that means that I can quit searching any further and just continue to re-read here before taking the plunge. Thanks!

BTW, am I correct that I don't save the current "master" JVC settings as the .init file, but, rather, the .init file occurs AFTER the first Autocal run on low lamp with manual iris fully open (which I hopefully won't screw up)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,800 Posts
I've been in touch with an ISF accredited calibrator to come at around 100 lamp hours. Is it recommended that I run Autocal prior to his visit in order to have a .init file for later reference/fall-back or should I create the .init from the Autocal after his visit and hold off running it for the first time until then?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
623 Posts
Here's the workflow I used for a Full Autocal a few days ago.


The top table is for running all Lamp, CMD and Filter combos. Gamma Autocal needs to be run 8 times. I use Gamma Quality = Normal to cut down the time.


Bottom Table is for running "Color Autocal" once for each Color Profile not covered in the Full Autocal Table. Note: CMD is "Off" for all combos in the Bottom Table.


Click on "Attached Thumbnails" for full table.


 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
623 Posts
Couple of advanced observations from the last full autocal:

1. Using Nat/Ref for wide filter did not create a quality gamma=Normal for Cin/Cin2. Not sure why. I saw no difference in gamut size when running full autocal with Wide Filter with Nat/Ref than Wide Filter with Cin/Cin2. Reference is supposed to be the native gamut for JVC and perhaps a wider gamut (device color space) than Cinema2. Cinema2 is suppose to be the closest gamut to DCI. I'm still running luminance analysis to see if HDR brightness is better with Nat/Ref in autocal ....
2. I did look at "Red Step 1" for all gamma autocals. If Red Step 1 = 0, then the projector bulb was not bright enough. Harry and Manni01 made some reference in their posts that if the first few Red Steps were close to zero, that was essentially zero ... that's not good, so one has to move the spyder meter closer to the projector. There is a balance between the bulb brightness (via meter positioning) being too bright vs. being able to see Red Step 1 significantly above 0. The Red Step 1 luminance I ended up using was 0.233 nits. The Wht Patch 100% Intensity was 10,900 nits. Note: A 50mm Opal Diffuser was attached to the Spyder 5 probe for these luminance readings. Your results may vary. http://www.edmundoptics.com/optics/windows-diffusers/optical-diffusers/opal-diffusing-glass/46106/


Later. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,130 Posts
All my statements were data driven. The latest test results did confirm the filter darkens luminance "when in place" and the shadows needs more luminance for larger color spaces ... with or without filter ... unless you have data to prove otherwise. :)
I was not disputing your data, just commenting that it seems like there's potentially some "bug" or "quirk" in the operation of the JVC that causes the need to bump brightness (for shadow response) with a larger gamut calibration. There isn't really another good reason for that to happen, the filters and everything are linear, so they shouldn't affect dark "colors" more than light, which means there's some electronic/software difference when targeting a larger colorspace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,856 Posts
I've been in touch with an ISF accredited calibrator to come at around 100 lamp hours. Is it recommended that I run Autocal prior to his visit in order to have a .init file for later reference/fall-back or should I create the .init from the Autocal after his visit and hold off running it for the first time until then?
The init file will not change, no matter when you "create" it. It corresponds to the original factory setting.
Strictly speaking, at 100 lamp hours there's not much point in running Autocal if you're getting the projector ISF calibrated. If you plan to run Autocal, you have to run it before the ISF calibration. Running it after the ISF calibration would literally invalidate that calibration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,800 Posts
The init file will not change, no matter when you "create" it. It corresponds to the original factory setting.
Strictly speaking, at 100 lamp hours there's not much point in running Autocal if you're getting the projector ISF calibrated. If you plan to run Autocal, you have to run it before the ISF calibration. Running it after the ISF calibration would literally invalidate that calibration.
That's very helpful. But does that mean that there's no way to save the ISF calibrator's work as a file accessible through Autocal if I prefer his settings and want to return to them at a later date? If that were to be the case, doesn't that amount to just throwing away money on a professional calibration since I'm told that it's beneficial to run Autocal on somewhat prescribed intervals (300-400 hours) to recalibrate gamma (etc.) as the lamp ages?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,856 Posts
That's very helpful. But does that mean that there's no way to save the ISF calibrator's work as a file accessible through Autocal if I prefer his settings and want to return to them at a later date? If that were to be the case, doesn't that amount to just throwing away money on a professional calibration since I'm told that it's beneficial to run Autocal on somewhat prescribed intervals (300-400 hours) to recalibrate gamma (etc.) as the lamp ages?
Assuming that Autocal is reasonably consistent every time you run it, you should indeed do the ISF calibration shortly after Autocal. Then, a few hundred hours later, when things start to drift, running autocal again will restore the image close to the time when the ISF calibration was done. Running Autocal should not affect the settings of the ISF calibration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,800 Posts
Assuming that Autocal is reasonably consistent every time you run it, you should indeed do the ISF calibration shortly after Autocal. Then, a few hundred hours later, when things start to drift, running autocal again will restore the image close to the time when the ISF calibration was done. Running Autocal should not affect the settings of the ISF calibration.
I'm not sure that I follow your logic. With regards to running Autocal, your prior response was: "Running it after the ISF calibration would literally invalidate that (ISF) calibration." But here you've answered that it would not affect the SETTINGS performed by the ISF calibration. I'm unable to make the distinction between these two posts. Could you possibly clarify a bit? Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,856 Posts
I'm not sure that I follow your logic. With regards to running Autocal, your prior response was: "Running it after the ISF calibration would literally invalidate that (ISF) calibration." But here you've answered that it would not affect the SETTINGS performed by the ISF calibration. I'm unable to make the distinction between these two posts. Could you possibly clarify a bit? Thanks!
For simplicity, assume the following:

If Autocal brings the status of the projector to A, while the final perfectly calibrated state is P, then
P=A+M, where M is the required "manual" adjustment, or M=P-A

As time goes on, the status of the projector drifts from A to D, so the overall performance becomes
D+M which degraded.

If you then re-perform Autocal, that would bring the status of the projector back to A, while the manual adjustments remain at M, so the overall performance will be back to
A+M, the same as immediately after ISF calibration.

If the "math" is too confusing, here's the gist of it:
If ISF calibration is performed over a known state, then you can go back to that known state (via Autocal) when drift occurs. This will bring you back close to the post-ISF status.
If, on the other hand, the ISF calibration is performed before Autocal, the projector would be in an "unknown" state, and it will be impossible to revert back to that state when drift occurs. That was what I said in the first reply.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,800 Posts
No, your math wasn't confusing, at all and I appreciate your approach. I guess where my misunderstanding lies is that I would have assumed that the ISF calibration would be done with a colorimeter and program which were NOT the Spyder 5 and JVC Autocal. That being the case, I also assumed that those "manual" adjustments would be lost in the subsequent Autocal event as I thought that all parameters (both A + M) would revert to "A". You're saying that this isn't the case and that all of the ISF calibrators software driven adjustments would remain non-volatile. I hadn't appreciated that being the case, so I'll have additional incentive to make a go at performing Autocal in order to establish a baseline for all future calibrations. Thanks for the time that you've taken in my education process!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
You'll find Nat/Std/6500/2.2 "the sweet spot" of the JVC projector. It will be slightly brighter than THX. Start with CR=0 and BR=0 ... raise BR to +1 or +2 if one cannot see dark image detail.


THX will likely have the most accurate colors of the 2 ... out of the box. More accurate colors will result in a slightly dimmer picture. Pick the one you like most.


Don't forget to try Cinema/Cinema2/6500k/2.3. This is the "movie" mode for those that like richer colors while still having great memory colors and skin tones. Colors will be more saturated to be closer what one would see in the commercial movie theaters ... but slightly dimmer, but see for yourself if you like it. Need CR-3, BR=0 or 1 for this mode. CR=contrast, BR=Brightness. I use this mode most often, but calibrated.


If you have light colored walls, ceiling and floor, the brightest mode will look the best ... because you'll have elevated black levels due to light reflections from light color surfaces to the screen ... and the only way to counteract this is with a brighter image which will cause the eye's pupil to constrict (smaller) making the brain think the blacks are darker.

If one has dark or black colored reflection surfaces (walls, ceiling ect.), then try THX or Cinema.

It's all a matter of what you like. Only use reference grade blu ray movies to make comparisons ... otherwise one will not know if any issue one sees is with the movie content itself or with the projector settings. Many threads on this topic in AVSforum.com. Lots of different levels of quality with Blu Ray movies for many reasons.

Go to JVC owners thread for more questions. This is the JVC autocal thread. They will be happy to offer suggestions to your non-autocal questions. :)

Good Luck. :)
I used Cinema mode "1". I like the high resolution in this mode! But black shadows look a little bluish "haze". Shadows are not as dense as I would like. Gamma in Cinema mode "1" - "A", color temperature - "Xenon 2".
You have changed in this mode, "Xenon 2" to 6500 and "A" by 2.3?

In THX mode, the resolution falls and unfortunately I do not like.

You use CMD in the "Cinema"?

What do you think about the following installation? :
Natural
Standard
Gamma 2.4
Lamp - Low
CMD - off

Thank you!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
623 Posts
I used Cinema mode "1". I like the high resolution in this mode! But black shadows look a little bluish "haze". Shadows are not as dense as I would like. Gamma in Cinema mode "1" - "A", color temperature - "Xenon 2".
You have changed in this mode, "Xenon 2" to 6500 and "A" by 2.3?

In THX mode, the resolution falls and unfortunately I do not like.

You use CMD in the "Cinema"?

What do you think about the following installation? :
Natural
Standard
Gamma 2.4
Lamp - Low
CMD - off

Thank you!


As far as your description of "better resolution", is it all right that I describe it as "better image detail"? My preference is to get "image detail" on reference quality 2k and 4k blu ray movies to pop. Here's some controls to play with to see "better image detail":


Enhance: Go into Picture Adjust (left most icon when you press menu on the remote), Motion Blur, and crank Enhance to +10. See if that sharpens "image detail". If it does, then reduce Enhance until you just notice the "image detail" becoming less sharp, then go back 1 click. The idea is to use a minimum of these "beautification" controls, but enough so your eye sees a difference.


Clear Black: This control does 2 things, it slightly raises the shadow brightness so it makes it easier to see dark shadow detail. More importantly, it also increases the brightness of white and bright fully saturated colors to provide more pop ... particularly in darker scenes. For example, in Prometheus, pick an outer space scene with stars and black background. Set Clear Black to High then toggle back and forth between Off and High. You note the white stars just pop off the screen when on High. Try this on Clear Black = Low. Pick what you like. I've seen brighter saturated colors, for example, in Xmen Apocalypse in the opening outdoor scene in ancient Egypt where there is a procession carrying a seated priest clothed in a golden garb adorned with jewels. In that scene toggle Clear Black Off/High and one will see the gold brighten quite a bit making the whole image pop better.


CMD: For some reason having CMD on High allows my eyes to fixate on the picture quicker when Enhance and Clear Black are activated. I still do not understand why ... perhaps the eye can fixate on a "motion picture" faster with a higher frame rate ... making high frame rate "motion pictures" appear to the eye as having better image detail ... just because it is easier and faster for the eye to lock on "faster frame rate" image motion.


As far as Cinema, if one is going to autocal Cinema, always use 6500K and Gamma 2.2/Normal. After calibration, then switch to Xenon Color Temp or Gamma = A to suite your preferences. I use Cinema/Cinema2/Xenon/Gamma2.3. Cinema2 will have higher saturated colors than Cinema1.


Nat/Std/6500K/G2.4 is good. If some non-reference quality blu ray movies look a little under exposed (dark), try G2.3, G2.2, G2.1 or G2.0 to brighten the image. If the movie is too over exposed (bright), use G2.4, 2.5, 2.6 to darken the movie. I use Nat/Std/6500K/G2.3 with a black velvet Home Theater environment ... I adjust Gamma until my eyes can "easily see" all the "image detail" without elevating dark shadow brightness excessively. Also, with a brighter ambient HT environment like yours (white ceiling), a lower gamma (2.2 or 2.1 or 2.0 rather than 2.4) may be a better choice. You decide.


Always use Gamma = Normal (same as G2.2) when auto calibrating. JVC uses that data to create "beautification" gammas for Film, Animation and HDR, among others, as noted below (yes, JVC's Gamma D is a beautification gamma/EOTF and it is best derived from Gamma Autocal where Gamma=Normal):


The film1 gamma shows really saturated colors will be given more brightness ... good for older films like Cleopatra and the Ten Commandments which are older films that have highly saturated colors in their costumes.




Fig 1. Film1 Gamma

Animation "Anime1" Gamma curve is a classic "S" shape gamma curve that is suppose to increase contrast for animatiom films (Shrek) or TV cartoons. Similar to JVC's Gamma B (more contrast) ... see page 38 of user manual for S Shape Gamma Curves: http://pro.jvc.com/pro/attributes/PRESENT/manual/2016_series_manual.pdf





Fig 2. Anime1 Gamma

Gamma D: This is a complex curve. 3 things to eventually understand about this curve: What is Ypeak (100 nits), the Wht/Blk clip points (1000/0.005 nits) and how bright the 50%/60% luminance levels are ... the 50%/60% Luminance levels are roughly where (or should be where) "Most Typical Objects" brightness is located in Dolby Vision terminology. 50%/60% is roughly where absolute luminance level 519 (64-940) is at based on my luminance analysis of the RS600. This See: http://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-display-calibration/2130474-hdr-calibration-discussion.html#post39828570




Fig3. Gamma D

Good Luck! :)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
As far as your description of "better resolution", is it all right that I describe it as "better image detail"? My preference is to get "image detail" on reference quality 2k and 4k blu ray movies to pop. Here's some controls to play with to see "better image detail":


Enhance: Go into Picture Adjust (left most icon when you press menu on the remote), Motion Blur, and crank Enhance to +10. See if that sharpens "image detail". If it does, then reduce Enhance until you just notice the "image detail" becoming less sharp, then go back 1 click. The idea is to use a minimum of these "beautification" controls, but enough so your eye sees a difference.


Clear Black: This control does 2 things, it slightly raises the shadow brightness so it makes it easier to see dark shadow detail. More importantly, it also increases the brightness of white and bright fully saturated colors to provide more pop ... particularly in darker scenes. For example, in Prometheus, pick an outer space scene with stars and black background. Set Clear Black to High then toggle back and forth between Off and High. You note the white stars just pop off the screen when on High. Try this on Clear Black = Low. Pick what you like. I've seen brighter saturated colors, for example, in Xmen Apocalypse in the opening outdoor scene in ancient Egypt where there is a procession carrying a seated priest clothed in a golden garb adorned with jewels. In that scene toggle Clear Black Off/High and one will see the gold brighten quite a bit making the whole image pop better.


CMD: For some reason having CMD on High allows my eyes to fixate on the picture quicker when Enhance and Clear Black are activated. I still do not understand why ... perhaps the eye can fixate on a "motion picture" faster with a higher frame rate ... making high frame rate "motion pictures" appear to the eye as having better image detail ... just because it is easier and faster for the eye to lock on "faster frame rate" image motion.


As far as Cinema, if one is going to autocal Cinema, always use 6500K and Gamma 2.2/Normal. After calibration, then switch to Xenon Color Temp or Gamma = A to suite your preferences. I use Cinema/Cinema2/Xenon/Gamma2.3. Cinema2 will have higher saturated colors than Cinema1.


Nat/Std/6500K/G2.4 is good. If some non-reference quality blu ray movies look a little under exposed (dark), try G2.3, G2.2, G2.1 or G2.0 to brighten the image. If the movie is too over exposed (bright), use G2.4, 2.5, 2.6 to darken the movie. I use Nat/Std/6500K/G2.3 with a black velvet Home Theater environment ... I adjust Gamma until my eyes can "easily see" all the "image detail" without elevating dark shadow brightness excessively.


Always use Gamma = Normal (same as G2.2) when auto calibrating. JVC uses that data to create "beautification" gammas for Film, Animation and HDR, among others, as noted below (yes, JVC's Gamma D is a beautification gamma/EOTF and it is best derived from Gamma Autocal where Gamma=Normal):


The film1 gamma shows really saturated colors will be given more brightness ... good for older films like Cleopatra and the Ten Commandments which are older films that have highly saturated colors in their costumes.




Fig 1. Film1 Gamma

Animation "Anime1" Gamma curve is a classic "S" shape gamma curve that is suppose to increase contrast for animatiom films (Shrek) or TV cartoons. Similar to JVC's Gamma B (more contrast) ... see page 38 of user manual for S Shape Gamma Curves: http://pro.jvc.com/pro/attributes/PRESENT/manual/2016_series_manual.pdf





Fig 2. Anime1 Gamma

Gamma D: This is a complex curve. 3 things to eventually understand about this curve: What is Ypeak (100 nits), the Wht/Blk clip points (1000/0.005 nits) and how bright the 50%/60% luminance levels are ... the 50%/60% Luminance levels are roughly where (or should be where) "Most Typical Objects" brightness is located in Dolby Vision terminology. 50%/60% is roughly where absolute luminance level 519 (64-940) is at based on my luminance analysis of the RS600. This See: http://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-display-calibration/2130474-hdr-calibration-discussion.html#post39828570




Fig3. Gamma D

Good Luck! :)
Thank you so much!
I like a newbie in this process is very, very interesting. :)
Changing the gamma value in "Natural" mode, from 2.2 to 2.4, will affect the "color profile", or only the brightness and contrast of the image?
Installations such as: Standard, 6500, 2.4 will be close to the parameters of the THX mode?
To reduce the overall brightness in any mode, I can slightly reduce the aperture of the lens, it will be correct?

In your opinion, what is the best mode for watching movies (BR, DVD) in a completely dark room, but where there is a white ceiling (unfortunately):
Standard, 6500, 2.4 or 2.3, СMD-off
or
Cinema 1, Xenon 2, "A" or 2.3, СMD-on?

Screen: white matt (1), 103 inches.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
As far as your description of "better resolution", is it all right that I describe it as "better image detail"? My preference is to get "image detail" on reference quality 2k and 4k blu ray movies to pop. Here's some controls to play with to see "better image detail":


Enhance: Go into Picture Adjust (left most icon when you press menu on the remote), Motion Blur, and crank Enhance to +10. See if that sharpens "image detail". If it does, then reduce Enhance until you just notice the "image detail" becoming less sharp, then go back 1 click. The idea is to use a minimum of these "beautification" controls, but enough so your eye sees a difference.


Clear Black: This control does 2 things, it slightly raises the shadow brightness so it makes it easier to see dark shadow detail. More importantly, it also increases the brightness of white and bright fully saturated colors to provide more pop ... particularly in darker scenes. For example, in Prometheus, pick an outer space scene with stars and black background. Set Clear Black to High then toggle back and forth between Off and High. You note the white stars just pop off the screen when on High. Try this on Clear Black = Low. Pick what you like. I've seen brighter saturated colors, for example, in Xmen Apocalypse in the opening outdoor scene in ancient Egypt where there is a procession carrying a seated priest clothed in a golden garb adorned with jewels. In that scene toggle Clear Black Off/High and one will see the gold brighten quite a bit making the whole image pop better.


CMD: For some reason having CMD on High allows my eyes to fixate on the picture quicker when Enhance and Clear Black are activated. I still do not understand why ... perhaps the eye can fixate on a "motion picture" faster with a higher frame rate ... making high frame rate "motion pictures" appear to the eye as having better image detail ... just because it is easier and faster for the eye to lock on "faster frame rate" image motion.


As far as Cinema, if one is going to autocal Cinema, always use 6500K and Gamma 2.2/Normal. After calibration, then switch to Xenon Color Temp or Gamma = A to suite your preferences. I use Cinema/Cinema2/Xenon/Gamma2.3. Cinema2 will have higher saturated colors than Cinema1.


Nat/Std/6500K/G2.4 is good. If some non-reference quality blu ray movies look a little under exposed (dark), try G2.3, G2.2, G2.1 or G2.0 to brighten the image. If the movie is too over exposed (bright), use G2.4, 2.5, 2.6 to darken the movie. I use Nat/Std/6500K/G2.3 with a black velvet Home Theater environment ... I adjust Gamma until my eyes can "easily see" all the "image detail" without elevating dark shadow brightness excessively.


Always use Gamma = Normal (same as G2.2) when auto calibrating. JVC uses that data to create "beautification" gammas for Film, Animation and HDR, among others, as noted below (yes, JVC's Gamma D is a beautification gamma/EOTF and it is best derived from Gamma Autocal where Gamma=Normal):


The film1 gamma shows really saturated colors will be given more brightness ... good for older films like Cleopatra and the Ten Commandments which are older films that have highly saturated colors in their costumes.



Good Luck! :)


What does Dynamic Contrast in the MPC menu do? Isn't this achieved by the Auto Iris?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
623 Posts
Thank you so much!
I like a newbie in this process is very, very interesting. :)
Changing the gamma value in "Natural" mode, from 2.2 to 2.4, will affect the "color profile", or only the brightness and contrast of the image?
Installations such as: Standard, 6500, 2.4 will be close to the parameters of the THX mode?
To reduce the overall brightness in any mode, I can slightly reduce the aperture of the lens, it will be correct?

In your opinion, what is the best mode for watching movies (BR, DVD) in a completely dark room, but where there is a white ceiling (unfortunately):
Standard, 6500, 2.4 or 2.3, СMD-off
or
Cinema 1, Xenon 2, "A" or 2.3, СMD-on?

Screen: white matt (1), 103 inches.
This is an JVC autocal thread ... where one is suppose to ask questions about JVC autocal.


That being said ... do you have a calibration disk? Contrast (CR) ctrl sets the brightest white (level 235) without clipping any of the 3 RGB channels. Brightness (BR) control sets the darkest black (16) without prematurely clipping any of the near black levels. Gamma works between the brightest white and the darkest black, but does not influence CR or BR. Gamma will increase or decrease the brightness of "typical objects" in a movie. The lower the gamma, the brighter the objects will be. The higher the gamma, the darker the objects will be. Gamma does not (or should not) affect setting CR or BR. For more details: http://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-digital-hi-end-projectors-3-000-usd-msrp/2222586-official-jvc-rs600-rs500-x950r-x750r-x9000-x7000-owners-thread-464.html#post46550833


Nat/Std/6500K/2.4 is close to THX only in terms of setting white/blk point and somewhat color temperature (6500K) accuracy. THX goes beyond this and sets color temperature and RGB primaries more accurately. THX will be slightly dimmer picture than Nat/Std/6500K/G2.4 due to the additional calibration performed in THX and that THX uses a filter lens ... the filter lens snaps into place when THX is selected to provide more saturated primaries ... but the lens is darker which darkens the picture a little. You should be able to use either THX or Nat/Std/6500K/G2.2. I would use G2.2 rather than G2.4 if the picture looks too dark in G2.4.


Your HT has bright light reflective surfaces, so use the brightest settings as a default (Nat/Std/6500K/G2.2). Don't be scared to try other settings ... and see what you like better. It's all a matter of personal preferences. You are better off with a slightly brighter setting due to the white ceiling ... but don't make it too bright or you may get eye fatigue and/or you may see some discoloration. There are several ways to brighten the picture: http://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-digital-hi-end-projectors-3-000-usd-msrp/2246658-jvc-calibration-software-v6-2015-models-x9000-x7000-x5000-rs400-rs500-rs600-37.html#post48241753


The brightest calibrated setting for Nat/Std/6500K/G2.2 is at its default settings (CR/BR=0). This is a very bright setting and many reduce the brightness by reducing the Lens Aperture. If the projector is too bright, one can reduce the LA anywhere from 0 to -15. Your choice.


When people say a light controlled room (a dark room), they are referring to no ambient light shining on the projector screen (from outside sun or a lamp) ... and ... all light reflective surfaces (walls, ceiling, floor) are really dark or black ... like black velvet black ... so no light from the projector bulb is reflected off the ceiling, walls or floor back into the screen. In your case with White ceiling, your better off with a slightly brighter picture because the brighter light will constrict the eye's pupil and will make the brain think it is seeing darker blacks. The light reflection off of your white ceiling is elevating the lowest black level on your screen ... so a brighter screen will help.


As far as Nat/Std/6500k/G2.4 vs Cin/Cin1/xenon/GammaA. Find an outdoor scene with Reference quality 4K/2K blu ray with costumes with highly saturated colors (Gods of Egypt opening celebration scene, Star Trek Into Darkness opening scene (great reds and whites), Kingsman) and pause it. View it under Nat/Std, then Cin/Cin1 ... go back and forth ... see what you like better. Some people like a more natural scene (no edge enhancements nor use of a wider color space other than what the blu ray was mastered in) with a highly calibrated projector (rec709 only). Some like the more saturated colors in Cin/Cin1 because it make the colorful costumes pop more and these colors are closer to what one sees in a commercial movie theater. You need to decide what your preference is. There is no wrong or right answer. Remember, JVC gives you many options to chose from, wider (cin1) and smaller (Std) color spaces via the many color profile to choose from, skin tones and memory colors which look good no matter what color profile you are using, tools to make the picture clearer and sharper, different brightness levels (Lamp Low High), different gamma levels to correct for under or over exposed dvds and blu rays or to correct for bright or light controlled ambient conditions. Can't do any better than JVC. ;)


Good Luck! :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
623 Posts
What does Dynamic Contrast in the MPC menu do? Isn't this achieved by the Auto Iris?


Dynamic Contrast and Auto Iris are separate ways to get better image detail.


Dynamic Contrast is an Edge Enhancement tool that tricks the eye into seeing darker/sharper blacks through more contrast ... it looks for dark and black areas of the picture and surrounds those areas with a brighter version of the colors that are already there.


Auto Iris opens and closes the iris to let more or less light in ... in real-time. Similar to backlight in LED tvs. I've seen Auto2 work well where it brightens really dark scenes and makes really dark shadow images slightly brighter ... making it easier on the eyes to see dark image detail in very dark scenes. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Dynamic Contrast and Auto Iris are separate ways to get better image detail.


Dynamic Contrast is an Edge Enhancement tool that tricks the eye into seeing darker blacks through more contrast ... it looks for dark and black areas of the picture and surrounds those areas with a brighter version of the colors that are already there.


Auto Iris opens and closes the iris to let more or less light in ... in real-time. Similar to backlight in LED tvs. I've seen Auto2 work well where it brightens really dark scenes and makes really dark shadow images slightly brighter ... making it easier on the eyes to see dark image detail in very dark scenes. :)
Thanks! :)
I had Dynamic Contrast on 5 and I couldn't figure out what was causing the ringing/edge-enhancement. I thought 'Enhance' or 'Clear Black' were the suspects.

Auto Iris 1 is more aggressive than Auto Iris 2, right?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Thanks! :)
I had Dynamic Contrast on 5 and I couldn't figure out what was causing the ringing/edge-enhancement. I thought 'Enhance' or 'Clear Black' were the suspects.

Auto Iris 1 is more aggressive than Auto Iris 2, right?
Auto Iris 1 can cause black crush in some scenes.
 
1161 - 1180 of 4389 Posts
Top