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OK, I figured it out. I thought I would give the procedure I used connecting a windows 10 pc directly to the projector in case someone else might be struggling like I was. Right click on the windows icon in lower left and choose network connections. On left click on Ethernet. Choose change adapter options. Right click on Ethernet device and choose properties. Look for internet protocol version 4 (TCP/IPv4). Click on that and choose properties. Then check Use The Following IP Address. Then I used IP address 192.168.0.1, Subnet mask 255.255.255.0, default gateway 192.168.0.254. On the projector I used 192.168.0.2. It connected right up. I just wanted to do a manual 2.4 gamma curve off the screen using chromapure and my i1 display, which works well now.
 

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I would say that that scene is not a bad one to use. I don't know it in particular BUT that disk makes good use of highlights, and is a 4000 nit mastered disc, so that's a good sign.

STEP 1) Before doing any of these things, use the autocal program just the way it's intended by JVC. You will need to get and use a specific meter to do that. This is required in order to get good results.

STEP 2) To use Arve's tool, with the guide, you don't need a meter, but it assumes you have run autocal already with a meter and got things dialed in with the JVC autocal tool -- which requires a meter -- first.


When you say "Adjust Contrast" that's sort of right. With Arve's tool (see links in my sig) while you do use the contrast control, at the end of the process, you end up with Contrast on the JVC set to ZERO. The Arve tool has redefined zero to be correct, based on the process.

If you follow the guide in my sig, for the Arve tool, you will only need clipping patterns for the black level. You might be able to fudge it with the test pattern easter egg on the Sony UHD discs. I ponied up for the Masciola patterns. And the guides assume you have those patterns.​

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EASIER STEP 2) Yes, instead of using Arve's tool, you can use a pre-made curve. You load it with the autocal program. This can get you a long way towards a good solution. With a screen that large, using Manni's so-called Dolby Cinema curve is not a bad choice. There is a link to that file in the first post of this thread.

I've already done the Autocal with a Spyder. I did a gamma-only calibration (once in low lamp and then again in high lamp), and a color-only calibration for rec.709 as well as bt.2020. (I was running a normal BD when doing bt.2020, but that doesn't matter, right?)

My main doubts pertain to using the Masciola patterns. Once I've gotten the custom curve setup, to which bar am I supposed to clip the blacks and whites? The PDF guide says for the brightness, bar 68 should be barely visible. What about whites?

I've downloaded the free demo as well on the main Masciola thread but I'm not sure how to use the files as it's not exactly a scale.

The Masciola patterns is the only part which is a little unclear to me. The rest of the calibration instructions are very detailed and clear.


EDIT:
I've just read that brightness and contrast is to be set to 0,0 when using Manni's curves.
Could help with how to use the wip tool with a clipping pattern? Lovingdvd's instruction need a movie to adjust the curve. The rest of his instructions are clear but what do I target if I'm using a Masciola pattern instead?
 

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I've already done the Autocal with a Spyder. I did a gamma-only calibration (once in low lamp and then again in high lamp), and a color-only calibration for rec.709 as well as bt.2020. (I was running a normal BD when doing bt.2020, but that doesn't matter, right?)
About this I am not sure. I outsourced this to Chad_B because he was doing a complete setup for me.

My main doubts pertain to using the Masciola patterns. Once I've gotten the custom curve setup, to which bar am I supposed to clip the blacks and whites? The PDF guide says for the brightness, bar 68 should be barely visible. What about whites?
I did not use the PDF guide. I used the WIP version of Arve's tool and this guide:

http://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-digital-hi-end-projectors-3-000-usd-msrp/2222586-official-jvc-rs600-rs500-x950r-x750r-x9000-x7000-owners-thread-759.html#post51467921



I've downloaded the free demo as well on the main Masciola thread but I'm not sure how to use the files as it's not exactly a scale.

The Masciola patterns is the only part which is a little unclear to me. The rest of the calibration instructions are very detailed and clear.
I found it necessary to do contrast first, then black levels, per this guide:
http://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-digital-hi-end-projectors-3-000-usd-msrp/2222586-official-jvc-rs600-rs500-x950r-x750r-x9000-x7000-owners-thread-759.html#post51467921

For contrast, you don't need the test patterns. That frame you quoted above works well.

For black level, you want to clip more than what you describe, and I used the Masciola patterns (paid version). I don't think there is a black level pattern in the free samples.

OK so I am about to distill a ton of research and experimentation into a very simple process you can follow to create your own custom curve. I am not going to go into the details of where to get the tools and setting them up - that's been covered elsewhere. Also this is not meant to be "all encompassing" so you may need to do more research to understand some of what I'm talking about here. Rather, the goal is to give you the quick steps to get your own curve up and running. So here ya go:

[Note that much of this is from memory - I need to revisit this and double check a few things, so for now consider this a draft]

1. Start with the latest version of Arve's tool from the wip branch.

2. Select a custom gamma slot, such as Custom 1, in the JVC. Change the correction value to "Import"

3. Set your contrast and brightness to 0 in the JVC and in your sources such as Panasonic UB900. This assumes Standard HDMI type.

4. Run Arve's tool menu.py.

5. Select lp, then option 2. This loads a default HDR curve into the tool.

6. Make sure your source is outputting HDR and not SDR BT2020.

7. Bring up a HDR image you want to test with. I use the "sky scene" in Pan at 18:55. However this scene only resolves up to 2750 nits. Although this is a good choice for those with large screens and low peak white nits (below 100, I only have about 45), if you have above 100 nits you'll be better off using a scene that resolves up to 4000 nits. Mad Max is often mentioned for this. You can find examples of scenes in a picture comparison thread several pages back. Note that I recommend using an actual scene (paused) from a HDR movie for this and not a white clipping pattern. The reason is because the clipping pattern can still show bars but crush in between. The best way to determine this is therefore with an actual scene. Certainly you can try it with a clipping pattern if you'd like to compare the results to doing the same approach with a scene from a movie, but if you only want to do it once, use a movie scene not a pattern for this.

8. Enter ga in the tool (gamma adjust). This will bring up a new menu.

9. Use option 3 "tune with contrast". This will load the tool's default HDR curve into the JVC and prepare itself for your contrast control adjustment (see next step).

10. Your image will be highly crushed in this initial state. See attached pan-sky-initial image. Lower contrast to the point where the crush is gone. See pan-sky-contrast-fully-tuned image - this is how mine looks once fully adjusted for no crush. Just keep dropping it until you feel that no image detail is being lost due to "bloom". When you find that point, raise contrast again a click or two and confirm that the blooming starts, lower it again - the point is toe just confirm that you have the right point. In my setup I think I had to drop contrast to around -18 or -20.

11. When you are done adjusting contrast, press Enter on Arve's tool (which is waiting for you to do so to tell it you're done adjusting contrast). This is where the magic happens... It will readjust your curve based on the brightness you need, send the new curve to the pj, and then automatically reset the JVC brightness back to 0 for you.

12. It gives you a chance to repeat this process, which may be necessary to fine tune a click or two. Change contrast a few clicks in either direction. Most likely you will be good now at 0 if you got it right in the first place (step 10). If you adjust contrast, go to step 11 and repeat. If you leave contrast at 0, when you hit return in the tool it'll exit this adjustment phase.

Tip: From early experimentation it seems that you can get extra brightness without as much crushing on 1000 nit master titles. Therefore if you have low nits like me, it may be worthwhile to have two "go to" curves - one for 1000 nit titles and one for 4000 nit titles. So repeat this whole process (all steps here) a 2nd time, but using a 1000 nit title like Lucy. The result will be a brighter curve that may work well on 1000 nit titles.

As a general guide, expect to lower contrast to about -17 to -23 for 4000 nit titles (crushing beyond 2750) and to about -5 to -7 for 1000 nit titles. Let your eyes guide you on the scenes, but that should give you a rough idea if you are in the right ballpark.

Tip [URL=http://www.avsforum.com/forum/usertag.php?do=list&action=hash&hash=2]#2 :[/URL] When using the contrast control to set the contrast so there is no clipping, you will likely create a picture that looks nice and properly saturated, but is too dim, particularly if you have less than 100 nits to start with. Therefore I recommend doing one curve with contrast set ideally, again, likely you will find that be around -23 to -17. After completing all the steps listed in this guide, repeat it from scratch again, but this time purposely crush some of the scene, perhaps with a contrast setting around -12 to -15. Finish all the steps here again, but save this into another preset. Then repeat everything once again, but with targeting a 1000 nit master and clipping around 1000, which will be around -5 to -7 as mentioned above. Save that into the 3rd slot. Then as you watch movies play around and see which one you will like best. Hint/spoiler alert: You will like the brightest one best. :) However you will crush some bright scenes as a result. So you'll have to decide what is an acceptable level of tradeoff. By having 3 different curves you can try any of them A/B to pick your favorite. You can even use the 1000 nit target curve for 4000 nit masters (but will crush them quite a bit) and still find it VERY pleasing, if you don't mind the crush.

13. At this point your curve is mainly complete. However this is where manually tweaking can be done. You can try changing the soft clip value (sc) lower or higher, and or changing the se value to control how steep the clip is. I lowered my sc from the auto setting and lower my se from 0.75 to 0.5. This further helped to tame some minor blooming I had in the highlights otherwise. For instance, after my contrast was tuned I still had some pretty heavy blooming in highlights. See pan-hand-highlight-high image. After lowering my sc and se I was able to tame it, without sacrificing much if any overall image brightness. See pan-hand-highlight-medium for the end result. Look at Pan's hand (wrist really) in both of those pics. Notice the bloom is tamed (somewhat) in the medium one. Look at the clouds above his hand in both pics - you can see how the excess bloom is tamed there as well.

Note: You will have to walk a fine line between how much crush you are willing to take for a brighter picture, or put another way, how dim of a picture you are willing to accept to minimize crush. The brighter the picture, not only is there more crush, but the picture begins to desaturate. In these two sky image examples those are at both ends - too high and too low. This picture is rather dim in the low one. So in reality I wind up cheating-up some by introducing some desaturation and some crush, but no where close to what the initial sky looks like. I have a few versions of this saved into different presets so I can change the curve to taste based on the movie.

14. Now it's time to fine tune the Brightness, tho we will not do that with any controls - just with Arve's tool. Leave brightness at 0 in JVC and elsewhere. Don't touch those controls... Bring up Ray's black clipping pattern, the 2nd one with the large bars. Pause it with the bars showing so the clip doesn't end on you while you are working on it, but hit play to help you see what's flashing or not as you make adjustments, then rewind to the beginning of the clip so it doesn't end on you as you work with hit. The idea here is to purposely crush black so that 0.005 nits is the black floor instead of 0. This should provide a lower black floor for content mastered at 0.005 black (about 70% of the content) while also not having any detrimental impact to content mastered at 0 nit black. To do this we target bars 77 and below to not be flashing, and 81 and above to be flashing.

15. Enter the command "bbi 0.005" to set this as your black floor for content. Issue Pw command to write this to the JVC. You will likely find that bar 81 and possibly higher bars are not visible/flashing. In that case use the "bbo" command to add just a touch of brightness, then send to the JVC with Pw command. Try something very small at first, like 0.002. You want to get to the point where you can't see bar 77 but can see bar 81. Keep trying bbo values and Pw until bar 81 shows but bar 77 does not.

16. At this point you are done. Use the command "s filename" to save your curve to your PC. Later you can use "lf filename" to reload your curve back into the tool and write it back to the pj, in case you want to work on it some more (or in case you want to overwrite it temporarily in the pj but then come back to it later).

17. Experiment. Try the same process over, but perhaps crushing your contrast-setting scene a bit more to give you more brightness. And or play with sc or se. Write curves into other custom gamma slots. Then bring up scenes and switch between them in the JVC. You may find that some curves work better for dark vs brighter movies.

Hope this helps!

Edit 3/14/17: Added screenshots and further clarification to steps 9-13.

Edit 3/15/17: Added more details on using bbi and bbo to set the proper black level; added more details on contrast fine tuning and idea of designing curves for 1000 vs 4000 nit titles.

Edit: 3/16/17: Added clarification to say to use a movie scene for the contrast tuning, not a white clipping pattern.

Edit: 3/17/17: Added tip #2 above, for ideas on how to generate curves with different brightness levels to pick from.
 

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About this I am not sure. I outsourced this to Chad_B because he was doing a complete setup for me.



I did not use the PDF guide. I used the WIP version of Arve's tool and this guide:

http://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-digital-hi-end-projectors-3-000-usd-msrp/2222586-official-jvc-rs600-rs500-x950r-x750r-x9000-x7000-owners-thread-759.html#post51467921





I found it necessary to do contrast first, then black levels, per this guide:
http://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-digital-hi-end-projectors-3-000-usd-msrp/2222586-official-jvc-rs600-rs500-x950r-x750r-x9000-x7000-owners-thread-759.html#post51467921

For contrast, you don't need the test patterns. That frame you quoted above works well.

For black level, you want to clip more than what you describe, and I used the Masciola patterns (paid version). I don't think there is a black level pattern in the free samples.


Alright, I think I've got it. I'll get the paid patterns and will try lovingdvd's method tomorrow.

Just two questions:

1) Creating a custom curve using lovingdvd's method includes tweaking the brightness using Arve's tool. So does this mean that once all of that is done, the brightness,contrast in the JVC should be left untouched? Basically, once you've made your custom curve using the above method, you can leave brightness/contrast at 0,0 in the projector, right? (I'm using Source Direct in the player.)

2) Is there a list specifying which discs are manufactured at 4000 nits and which are at 1000? If you create a second curve for 1000 nits movies, how would you know which curve to use? I know that BvS is 4000 nits and Lucy is 1000 nits, but I have idea about the rest of the UHDs.
 

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1) Yes, if you do this right, the Arve tool redefines 0 brightness and 0 contrast to be correct, so that is what you should have the JVC set at when using the Custom Import gamma.

2) There is a list or two floating around. Frankly, just made a curve that I find acceptable for 4000 nit titles,and it's great for 100 nit titles too. I might be giving up a little potential brightness but it's not so much that I would both to change it on a per movie basis.

(If you have the Oppo, you can tell by choosing the details screen whether a movie was mastered on a 4000 or 1000 nit monitor.... but many 4000 nit mastered titles might never use more than 2000 nits, so.... I don't worry about it.)

Alright, I think I've got it. I'll get the paid patterns and will try lovingdvd's method tomorrow.

Just two questions:

1) Creating a custom curve using lovingdvd's method includes tweaking the brightness using Arve's tool. So does this mean that once all of that is done, the brightness,contrast in the JVC should be left untouched? Basically, once you've made your custom curve using the above method, you can leave brightness/contrast at 0,0 in the projector, right? (I'm using Source Direct in the player.)

2) Is there a list specifying which discs are manufactured at 4000 nits and which are at 1000? If you create a second curve for 1000 nits movies, how would you know which curve to use? I know that BvS is 4000 nits and Lucy is 1000 nits, but I have idea about the rest of the UHDs.
 

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Before I try making my own custom curve, I'm thinking of first downloading one of the many that have been created by Manni on the first page. The choice is a little overwhelming. I have a 140 inch screen and my throw distance is around 20 ft. I have white walls so I guess that counts as light leakage. My lamp is new (140 hours) and I plan on running it on High with the iris fully open to make up for the throw distance and screen size.
Which curves would you recommend I start with?
Quick comment on large screens and white walls - with white screen material you might want to put more time and effort in room treatments first as by not doing so will defeat the whole purpose you're trying to achieve.

You want these curves give justice to the image but you'll lose out significantly in color and detail quickly once you're at that scene again under such room condition above. :)

That scene is a good nit example, btw.
 

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I have a couple of quick questions for the "experts" please - would appreciate explanation or link to get me started so I don't have to search these long threads. System is Oppo 203 to RS500. I have tried Oppo SDR/BT2020 to JVC and love it. Now experimenting/learning about Manni's custom curve.

1. When you import Manni's curve, is there a way to give it a name instead of using "Custom 1" or "Custom 2".

2. SDR/BT2020 color profile looks much better/more saturated than HDR/Manni's curve, what am I doing wrong please? I've left pretty much every other parameters in "neutral/standard mod."

Settings for SDR/BT2020: Temp 6500, Color profile BT2020, Gamma and rest of settings are "standard/neutral/nothing fancy, etc." Very nice saturated picture without any adjustment.

Settings for HDR/Manni's curve: Temp 6500, Gamma custom 1 (Manni's gamma imported). Color profile and Rest is standard. Pic looks washed out so I'm doing something wrong, just don't know what.
 

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I have a couple of quick questions for the "experts" please - would appreciate explanation or link to get me started so I don't have to search these long threads. System is Oppo 203 to RS500. I have tried Oppo SDR/BT2020 to JVC and love it. Now experimenting/learning about Manni's custom curve.

1. When you import Manni's curve, is there a way to give it a name instead of using "Custom 1" or "Custom 2".

2. SDR/BT2020 color profile looks much better/more saturated than HDR/Manni's curve, what am I doing wrong please? I've left pretty much every other parameters in "neutral/standard mod."

Settings for SDR/BT2020: Temp 6500, Color profile BT2020, Gamma and rest of settings are "standard/neutral/nothing fancy, etc." Very nice saturated picture without any adjustment.

Settings for HDR/Manni's curve: Temp 6500, Gamma custom 1 (Manni's gamma imported). Color profile and Rest is standard. Pic looks washed out so I'm doing something wrong, just don't know what.
That - underlined - you need BT2020 selected for HDR also, not standard.
 

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1) Yes, if you do this right, the Arve tool redefines 0 brightness and 0 contrast to be correct, so that is what you should have the JVC set at when using the Custom Import gamma.

2) There is a list or two floating around. Frankly, just made a curve that I find acceptable for 4000 nit titles,and it's great for 100 nit titles too. I might be giving up a little potential brightness but it's not so much that I would both to change it on a per movie basis.

(If you have the Oppo, you can tell by choosing the details screen whether a movie was mastered on a 4000 or 1000 nit monitor.... but many 4000 nit mastered titles might never use more than 2000 nits, so.... I don't worry about it.)
Thanks for the clarification. Just wanted to be sure.

That Oppo feature is something I didn't know about and is quite convenient. I think I've done enough homework for this. I'll try it tonight :) .



Quick comment on large screens and white walls - with white screen material you might want to put more time and effort in room treatments first as by not doing so will defeat the whole purpose you're trying to achieve.

You want these curves give justice to the image but you'll lose out significantly in color and detail quickly once you're at that scene again under such room condition above. :)

That scene is a good nit example, btw.
I'm in a rented place so I can't do anything about the wall colors :) . It's also the living room so I prefer white. I understand that there's a loss of contrast due to the reflection, so I'll definitely keep that in mind whenever I move. Till then, I'll squeeze out whatever I can with these settings.

That's the brightest spot that I could remember off the top of my head. I'll be getting a lot more UHDs next week so I'll have more of a choice then.


That - underlined - you need BT2020 selected for HDR also, not standard.

Alright, a few noobish questions:

1) When calibrating the bt.2020 color profile, does a UHD need to be playing on the projector? (I did my first calibration when a BD was playing as I thought Gamma D shouldn't be selected while doing a color-only calibration?)

2) Which gamma should be selected while calibrating bt.2020?

3) Does a 'reference' color profile need to be selected while doing a gamma cal for bt.2020? Or does this not matter?
 
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That - underlined - you need BT2020 selected for HDR also, not standard.
1. Ah - sorry, rookie mistake; thanks. The next major step is to ajdust brightness and contrast using UHD pattern?

2. You have answer for my other question pls: renaming the "custom 1" gamma to for example "Manni 1" or "Manni 2," etc. No big deal and easy for me to try, just afraid of messing things up.

TIA
 

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1) Yes, if you do this right, the Arve tool redefines 0 brightness and 0 contrast to be correct, so that is what you should have the JVC set at when using the Custom Import gamma.

2) There is a list or two floating around. Frankly, just made a curve that I find acceptable for 4000 nit titles,and it's great for 100 nit titles too. I might be giving up a little potential brightness but it's not so much that I would both to change it on a per movie basis.

(If you have the Oppo, you can tell by choosing the details screen whether a movie was mastered on a 4000 or 1000 nit monitor.... but many 4000 nit mastered titles might never use more than 2000 nits, so.... I don't worry about it.)

Alright, so I finally tried it using lovingdvd's method. Using several scenes from Batman v Superman, I found reducing the contrast to -15 to be a good compromise.

I bought the patterns too. And this is where I screwed up. I entered bbi 0.05 and bbo 0.02 instead of '0.005' and '0.002'.

If I load the gamma curve again and start from scratch, will it reset it? Or should I first import a new curve and then start this process? The above screw up affects only this custom gamma slot, right?


Before I started tweaking this gamma curve using Arve, Manni's dolby vision curve had been loaded in this slot. Does it matter which curve you're tweaking using Arve? I'm guessing no because as I understand it, it resets the curve completely?


And this is my result after calibrating bt.2020. This looks good, right?




Basically, I screwed up adjusting the brightness and now need to reset.
 

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I find that starting over from scratch following the Speed Guide (linked in my sig) is the safest bet. And doing it in the order presented. Yes, this requires loading a default when in Arve's tool and tweaking from scratch.

I don't know that this is necessary, but I tried it backwards once (adjusting brightness then contrast) and the results were sub par.
 

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I recently bought RS500 and to put it mildly was overwhelmed with the info available. While the 2 JVCx00 threads are incredibly helpful and complete (thanks Manni et al.), I was hoping for specific instructions for newbie type like me :) and couldn't find any. So here is my attempt to return the favor; anyone please correct as needed as I am no expert. I will edit and update as needed.

Prelim thoughts: Although I don't know much about video calibration, I am an off-the-chart nutty shutterbug and spend hours upon hours adjusting my travel pictures (about 4000 shots each trip & several trips over last 15-20 years) in raw format, from color temp, to levels, brightness, sharpness etc.; IOW I think I have a reasonable appreciation of image evaluation. For my system, using the generic Manni curves, the best saturation and pq I see with HDR UHD using Deep Water Horizon, with Oppo 203 to JVC RS500, on 8 ft wide Stewart Greyhawk, is either with:
1. SDR 2020
2. HDR 2020 using Manni's 600 curve, high lamp, contrast +4, brightness +2.
Curiously I have observed that in my system, using the High Lamp mode actually affects color and color saturation (better/more saturated to my eyes). It shouldn't, but that's what I see with the tested movie. (To document and compare color & saturatioin changes with the 3 Manni curves in my system, I actually took and examined pictures taken with manual exposure AND white balance setting, in raw format.)


Manni's Curves for Dummies in less than 10 steps: while waiting for Chad B LOL. Kidding aside the picture in all modes is now spectacular to my eyes: saturated, bright, wonderfully contrasty. It "pops." I am so glad I've chosen the RS500 as it saves a chunk of money over RS520. IMHO RS500 is a good move with true 4k, cheaper laser, next messy HDMI standard, etc. all looming.
1. Load JVC Auto Calibration software into computer http://www3.jvckenwood.com/english/download/dla-x900r_x700r_xc7880_xc5880_rs67_rs57_rs49_calibrationsoft.html
2. Connect JVC directly to computer with Cat 5 cable (the alternative method of connecting JVC to home network didn't work for me), follow *exact* instruction for manual setting of internet address here: http://www3.jvckenwood.com/english/download/file/JVC_CP_import_procedure_en_v1_00.pdf ***Important***: if you laptop has wireless network adapter - turn it off during the import process (which is of course done through the Cat 5 cable).
3. Import BT.2020 Color Profile from here http://www3.jvckenwood.com/english/download/dla-x950r_x750r_x550r_x9000_x7000_x5000_xc7890r_xc6890r_xc5890r_rs600_rs500_rs400_uhd.html
4. Import the 3 Manni's Curves, which is the very bottom attachment on the very first post of Manni's Calibration Thread HERE - they will be loaded as Custom 1, 2, 3 in the JVC. 600 is brightest, 1100 is darkest.
5. Click Info on JVC Remote, go to Picture Adjust, select picture mode "User 1" (could click on User Name Edit if you want to change name to HDR or whatever).
6. Set Gamma to one of the Custom 1, 2, or 3 gamma curves (the 3 Manni's curves).
7. ***Don't forget this*** On same screen, set "Correction Value" to "Import"
8. Set Color Profile to BT.2020
9. Just remember every time you load and HDR UHD disc, you need to do 2 clicks: first click for picture mode "User 1" (or whatever name you changed it to), and second click to change Gamma from D to "Custom 1". If you don't want to have to do the second click, then use the next step below, adding HDFury Linker.


HDFury Linker for Dummies in 5 steps if anyone is interested. :)
1. Download driver, called Silabs and in rar format, and install on your computer. The manual is here https://www.hdfury.com/docs/HDfuryLinker.pdf and the driver is here http://www.hdfurylinker.com/download/
2. Download the combined Firmware Updater and Linker's Graphic User Interface file from the same download page; this is the program file with the word NEW in red next to it.
3. Connect Linker to computer with USB cable, click on this program "LINKER-MCU-v0.20.exe," then click on "update" to update firmware.
4. ***Most important step***: Start the GUI program "LINKER_GUI_0.19.exe," then on the second tab labeled HDR/AVI, click on that little square that says "Disable HDR", then click on "Send HDR" to send the new setting to the Linker. You are essentially stripping the HDR flag from the video signal that the projector is receiving.
5. There is a little button on the side of Linker, slide it to the "SINK EDID" position - this works for my system. In case you are wondering SINK is the darn technical slang for the darn display (that's all!) so SINK EDID just means HDFury Linker sends signal appropriate for the display (SINK), which is my JVC RS500. (There are Custom EDID 2 also, but SINK EDID works for me and is simplest.) That's it: Oppo 203 to Linker, Linker to HDMI 1 of JVC RS500. Blue Jeans cable is best copper HDMI (35 ft works for me), whereas Ruipro and Monoprice fiberoptic have got good reports for longer lengths.

***With HDFury now installed, you only need one click to view HDR UHD movies, to picture mode "User 1." The second click to switch out of Gamma D is no longer necessary. Why? In step 4 above, basically you are playing a trick on your JVC projector, telling it: "I am not sending you HDR (even though you are), don't switch me to Gamma D, keep using my preset Manni's Gamma curve."
***Besides eliminating the need to do that second click, having the HDFury Linker in the chain now allows you to change the setting for Iris (under JVC Picture Adjust menu) to "Auto," which is Dynamic Iris. Without Linker, the only choice you have is Manual, meaning no Dynamic Iris.


Converting HDR.2020 to SDR.2020 for Dummies in 2 steps. No time at all. :)
This mode allows you to play HDR (High Dynamic Range) UHD disc as SDR (Standard Dynamic Range) UHD. You lose HDR, but retains the other feature of UHD Blu-ray: the Wide Color Gamut BT.2020 (as opposed to SR.709 of regular Blu-ray).
1. In Oppo 203, click Setup, then go to Video Setting, then to HDR tab, click on "Strip Metadata." Remember you have to switch this back to Auto if you are going to use Manni's HDR gamma curve.
2. In JVC, click "Info" then "Picture Adjust" and then User Mode 2 or whatever number (may change this name to SDR 2020 for example), set Color profile to BT.2020 that you downloaded above, set everything else to zero, neutral, standard, and slide the slides to the left.
Amazingly enough, that is actually *it*. This mode has beautiful color, saturation, contrast without much adjustment. I actually take screen shot of this mode and use it as a standard and to compare my various Manni Curve's adjustments.
 

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was literally just about to ask a newb question, but found the answer in your crystal clear post cannga.
cheers.
 

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Great post with easy answers although weren't the curves Manni put in the zip at the end of the first post outdated and not recommended by Manni anymore? I think there are actually a few things in there he doesn't recommend using anymore that may need to just be deleted for ease of use of the post. Manni?
 

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4. Import the 3 Manni's Curves, which is the very bottom attachment on the very first post of Manni's Calibration Thread HERE - they will be loaded as Custom 1, 2, 3 in the JVC. 600 is brightest, 1100 is darkest. ...
.
Which are the 3 Manni's Curves? I can not find the link
tanks
 

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Great point @Kris Deering (and for pippo53), I actually have the same question.

On Manni's first post of this thread, AFAIK there are actually references to two sets of Gamma curves, and I don't know which one is "better":

I. At the very bottom of the first post, there is an attachment "New Custom Gamma Files 2-27-17" this opens to:
1. 600-400-4000
2. 800-600-4000
3. 1000-240-4000
4. 1100-800-4000

II. In the middle of the first post there is a second link to a post on April 16, 2017. This post http://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-digital-hi-end-projectors-3-000-usd-msrp/2222586-official-jvc-rs600-rs500-x950r-x750r-x9000-x7000-owners-thread-795.html#post52293025 has an attachment "Manni New Custom Gamma Files 16-04-17" this opens to:
5. 800-335-4000 Black 64
6. 800-335-4000 Black 77

1, 2, and 4 appear to be what AVS is preloading the projectors with.
1 is what I tried - with high lamp and contrast 4 brightness 2, this is the setting that at least matches SDR.2020
5 and 6 are the newest, but I have not tried them yet because one I need 600 for better brightness, and two, Manni seems to indicate that this is specifically for his setup with smaller screen and in a very dark environment (Manni pls correct me as needed).

Does @Manni01 now only recommend the newer set from 16-04-17? I would appreciate comments on the difference between the 2 sets pls Manni.
 

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Yer, i used this one

also i understand you need to power cycle the projector after importing. maybe add that step.
 
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Yer, i used this one

also i understand you need to power cycle the projector after importing. maybe add that step.
Power cycle is only required for color profiles that use a filter. Gamma curves don't require a power cycle.
 

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I. At the very bottom of the first post, there is an attachment "New Custom Gamma Files 2-27-17" this opens to:
1. 600-400-4000
2. 800-600-4000
3. 1000-240-4000
4. 1100-800-4000

II. In the middle of the first post there is a second link to a post on April 16, 2017. This post http://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-digital-hi-end-projectors-3-000-usd-msrp/2222586-official-jvc-rs600-rs500-x950r-x750r-x9000-x7000-owners-thread-795.html#post52293025 has an attachment "Manni New Custom Gamma Files 16-04-17" this opens to:
5. 800-335-4000 Black 64
6. 800-335-4000 Black 77
...


I took pictures of two different gamma curves (other settings identical), to compare #1 with target 600 (from older set of curve in February) versus #5 with 800 target (from newer set of curve in April). Both with high lamp.

It seems the difference in target is what causes the difference (#1 is brighter), not whether it's old set vs new set. Also it's not absolute quality that I am trying to show (can't with screen shot), but the *difference* between these two curves. I paid attention to the shading of the right cheek of Mark Wahlberg, from area underneath right eye (bright) going back to his right ear (dark). The difference is quite a bit more obvious in full resolution.

#1 600 target



#5 800 target

 
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