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I was lookin at this projector and it seems pretty good.. Im not familiar with Dila at all.. Im just curious if anyone who has this projector can tell me some bad or good about it(image quality, setup etc..)? Is Dila worth it over DLP or LCD?


Chris
 

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Chris,


Everything you'll ever want to know is here. Plan on putting aside a couple days or so for this reading. :D

DILA FAQ


Chris
 

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The FAQ is VERY worthwhile reading, but a bit detailed for a newbie.


The short answer is that the D-ila G-15 is a great projector, for the HT owner who is willing to invest the time and money to get a superior image (I have two G-11s, which are no longer made by JVC). To get their full potential, you need (a) to have the projector calibrated or self calibrate using Dilard software and the related color analyzer, (b) use a hushbox, if the projector will be located near the seating area, due to fan noise, and (c) use an external scaler or HTPC (scaler in the D-ila not that good - HTPC is probably the preferred solution).


Positives are (a) very high fill factor (no screen door effect, until you are right up on the screen), (b) 1365 x 1024 - count them - pixels, (c) decent contrast ratios (after calibration), (d) good brightness, (e) awesome HD picture and (f) no rainbow effects (problem with DLP units). Negative is high bulb cost ($800/1000 hours, unless you use aftermarket bulbs, then $550 for somewhere between 1000 - 2000 hours).


Lots of satisfied people on this forum, few detractors, although everyone tends to prefer their own projector solution. I originally eliminated the D-ila projectors due to the "high maintenance" issues mentioned above, and used an LCD projector (Sony W400Q). Ultimately I broke down and got with the D-ila program and have been very happy with the G-11 projector ever since. The G-15 is essentially the same as the G-11 projector, except the G-15 is brighter.


Hope this helps.


Marcel J. Dumeny
 

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I agree that calibration for the DILA is essential, but I think that a hushbox and a scaler are luxuries that make the DILA experience even better. I have frequently used my G-15 without a scaler and have been very satisfied with the picture through any decent progressive scan DVD player. It certainly is better than any of the DLP's or LCD's I have seen. The scaler (I have a Rock+) just makes it that much better. Also, I have used my G-15 without a hushbox at times also. Yes there is a little noise, but I have never noticed it during a movie.


Like Marcel, I initially eliminated the DILA's and first went the DLP route, then tried LCD. I finally wound up with the G-15 because I couldn't stand rainbows or screendoor and have been happy ever since. And I would still prefer the DILA by a fairly wide margin even if I wasn't able to afford a scaler or a hushbox.
 

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The company I install for has a couple of clients who went with this projector, and they both love it.


One client has it in a large basement room, and put it in place of the existing Sony G50 when he bought the house. He loves it.


The other client has it in an "opry house" near Sedona, where they had us throw it into a box up on the balcony, projecting a 22 foot diagonal (the nights are dark out in Ariaona) onto a wall that is just high grade flat white paint. The image is stunning.


I am going to take everybody's advice here and get the darn thing tweaked. Despite the "screen" they are using, these are not yahoos, and they will notice and appreciate the improvement.
 

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Rats. I forgot a detail.


This projector has no keystone adjustment, so, ceiling mounted, the center of the lens is the same distance off the floor as the top of the image. This can be a mechanical challeng: I would like to use this projector for a client where the top of the screen will only be about 90" off the floor, but that places the projector too low.


If the screen is static, a keystone "adjustment" can be fudged by not mounting the screen perfectly vertically, but mounting it at right angles to the line from lens to top of image. In other words, if the projector is higher than the top of the image, the bottom of the screen is kicked out from the wall toward the audience to make the image rectangular on the screen. Then, though, the screen will appear to the audience to be wider at the bottom than at the top, giving us another mess.
 

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How much too low is the pj? Can you box off the image with a dark frame?


Are you aware that tweaking the image will cost you a bit of brightness? This loss is not a factor for a 100 inch diagonal screen in a light controlled interior theater but just might be signifigant with a screen area four or five times greater with some ambient light.


Something better might be just around the corner, but I have never seen anything digital that matches the D-ILA. The quality of the picture makes one immediately forget the heat, noise, and bulb cost. Art
 

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Art sez: How much too low is the pj? Can you box off the image with a dark frame?


The top of the image is at about 90" so the center of the lens will be at the same about 90" height. This puts the bottom of the projector at about 86 inches. If we do anything at all to enlose the projector, I would want it to have at least two inches of clearance below the projector, then 3/4" thickness, so now we are down to about 83 1/4".


Add that to the fact that the ceiling slopes upward toward the image, and goes way above it (the screen hangs from a soffit that has three feet of clearance above it), and it turns out that this box will be about where the ceiling is nine feet high.


Nine feet high ceiling, box down to just below seven feet. Oh, yeah, the ceiling has nothing else hanging down from it and is about forty-five fet wide, sloping upward about twenty-five feet. That thing would look like a college dorm refrigerator that fell through the roof and almost crashed to the floor.


So I'd like one with keystone adjustment. The client also insists that it be watchable, at least for news, during the day with untreated windows, so I'm looking for a unit with at least 1500 lumens; 2000 would be better. And of course his goal is a $5000 projector. Once I locate the actual choices, or lack of them, and show him what it will really cost, he will probably come up with some pretty spiffy window treatments.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by HomeThtrLA


The top of the image is at about 90" so the center of the lens will be at the same about 90" height. This puts the bottom of the projector at about 86 inches. If we do anything at all to enlose the projector, I would want it to have at least two inches of clearance below the projector, then 3/4" thickness, so now we are down to about 83 1/4".
Add a Panamorph!


The Panamorph drops the image about 5" for every 10 feet of throw, if memory serves.


So if you have a 20 foot throw - that would buy you 10 inches of headroom - not to mention the image advantages

of using an anamorphic lens.


Dr. Gregory Greenman

Physicist
 

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"Add a Panamorph" sound simple, but...


The Panamorph web site is now just one page, with no working link to the actual product info.


Where can this be gotten? For how much?


My client is buying a 4:3 projector to use as a 4:3 projector as well as a 16:9 on the same screen. As I understand the Panamorph from about two minutes' reading, his 4:3 would be unwatchable with the Panamorph. Or does he reach up and flip it out of the way (which then brings us back to the screen height/projector height problem)?
 

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I hadn't understood the $5000 part. You would have a time doing this well for three times his price.


No problem with the panamorph and 4:3 or 16:9. There are programs that one can run into the pj that will "crush" all of the input to be spread back to shape by the panamorph. I imagine that the lens is probably a couple thousand dollars, give or take. Someone will know exactly. The cost is your issue. Everything else seems doable. Art
 

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"The Panamorph drops the image about 5" for every 10 feet of throw, if memory serves."


It's actually about an inch drop per foot of throw. 10 ft would yeild a 9 3/4" drop. The multiplier is .081 X inches of throw.


HomeThtrLA,


As Art says, 4:3 isn't a problem with the Panamorph. Actually though, the DILA 'expands' the image(from 16:9 set sources) and the lens 'compresses' it. The DILA is always left in 4:3 mode, using the entire panel, whereas normally the Pj is set to 16:9 mode and uses only 768 of the panels lines on a 16:9 image.


Chris
 

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You can buy the panamorph lens right here. Send Jason Turk an email for details.


If you have a scaler, then more than likely you will be able to watch 4x3 and 16x9 with the panamorph lens on.
 

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Danny,


Not having a good scaler would be a bit odd after having put out the cost of a G15 but you don't need a scaler to enjoy 4:3 and 16:9 from an anamorphically lensed pj. The scaler on the G15 may really do poorly with deinterlacing but it does a good job of scaling the input to a squeezed 4:3. Forgive my ignorance of these terms but everytime I turn the things on and use it to watch the Directv, HD and not, I am amazed at the job done by the pj and by the D-ILA Marks who helped me set up the thing. By the way, I do use a Scaler for DVD and the result can be close to less than top notch HD. I am still stopped by that 5K figure. Art
 
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