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Building new home theater. JVC NX7. 140-50” screen. Trying to decide on what aspect ratio screen. 70-80% Sports/TV, 20-30% movies. I watch more regular tv but when I watch a movie I want to see it in all of its cinematic glory. (No black bars on top and bottom) So I guess the bottom line question is, with lens memory, do you get more “distortion “ when stretching a movie vertically on a 16:9 screen or when you stretch a horizontal 16:9 image on a 2:35:1 screen? It seems to me that with the JVC lens memory, installing a 2:35:1 screen would give you the optimum viewing experience for movies and the slight horizontal stretch would also give you an awesome sports viewing experience, as opposed to vertically stretching a 2:35:1 movie image on a 16:9 screen? Opinions please. Thanks
 

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Building new home theater. JVC NX7. 140-50” screen. Trying to decide on what aspect ratio screen. 70-80% Sports/TV, 20-30% movies. I watch more regular tv but when I watch a movie I want to see it in all of its cinematic glory. (No black bars on top and bottom) So I guess the bottom line question is, with lens memory, do you get more “distortion “ when stretching a movie vertically on a 16:9 screen or when you stretch a horizontal 16:9 image on a 2:35:1 screen? It seems to me that with the JVC lens memory, installing a 2:35:1 screen would give you the optimum viewing experience for movies and the slight horizontal stretch would also give you an awesome sports viewing experience, as opposed to vertically stretching a 2:35:1 movie image on a 16:9 screen? Opinions please. Thanks
The lens memory function does not stretch nor squeeze the aspect ratio - it applies zoom, shift, and focus to a preset you create and it preserves the original aspect ratio of the source material. The general suggestion for your needs you described would be to experiment with projected image sizes on a wall before buying a screen until you find your favorite size and viewing distance combo for all 16:9 material and set that as a lens memory, then play content with 2.35:1 aspect ratio and zoom your image so that image height is the same as your 16:9 content, but the width is greater, and if that looks good to you for viewing cinemascope movies then you set that as your 2nd lens memory. Now buy a 2.35 screen and movies will look glorious as you desire (black bars top and bottom will spill off the screen and will not be seen if you have velvet surround or dark walls), and your first lens memory will zoom down so 16:9 content fills the height of your screen and you have dark space on either side. Some people will add simple DYI masking to those sides when watching the 16:9 content but others are not bothered by the dark sides.

Just as an FYI, aspect ratios cannot be changed except for two destructive ways - 1) distorting the image by squeezing/stretching using software, or 2) cropping off some content. Most of us HT aficionados and film lovers abhor the idea of distorting or cropping the art of the artist - we respect and preserve the aspect ratio chosen by the director and the zoom method using the JVC lens memory works great for that.

Ross
 

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The lens memory function does not stretch nor squeeze the aspect ratio - it applies zoom, shift, and focus to a preset you create and it preserves the original aspect ratio of the source material. The general suggestion for your needs you described would be to experiment with projected image sizes on a wall before buying a screen until you find your favorite size and viewing distance combo for all 16:9 material and set that as a lens memory, then play content with 2.35:1 aspect ratio and zoom your image so that image height is the same as your 16:9 content, but the width is greater, and if that looks good to you for viewing cinemascope movies then you set that as your 2nd lens memory. Now buy a 2.35 screen and movies will look glorious as you desire (black bars top and bottom will spill off the screen and will not be seen if you have velvet surround or dark walls), and your first lens memory will zoom down so 16:9 content fills the height of your screen and you have dark space on either side. Some people will add simple DYI masking to those sides when watching the 16:9 content but others are not bothered by the dark sides.



Just as an FYI, aspect ratios cannot be changed except for two destructive ways - 1) distorting the image by squeezing/stretching using software, or 2) cropping off some content. Most of us HT aficionados and film lovers abhor the idea of distorting or cropping the art of the artist - we respect and preserve the aspect ratio chosen by the director and the zoom method using the JVC lens memory works great for that.



Ross
I am 100 % behind this post. Video Sermon #1 . Preach on it.

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I like my NX7 and 2:40 screen with a Paladin DCR lens. Easy change back and forth to different anamorphic modes. I will take the black bars on the side of the screen to watch what little 16:9 content I do watch and then have no bars top or bottom for movies. Now, I imagine stacking a Lumagen on top of my setup would solve even the side bars too but not ready to drop $5K on one yet, but will eventually.
 

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Keep in mind there are other aspect ratios and other media of different sizes. Much of the made for TV shows and movies that Netflix, Amazon and others are making are using 2.0:1 AR and a few others. Movies made in Hollywood are mostly 2.40:1 or 1.85:1 and TV of course is 1.77:1. There are a few movies made very wide screen 2.76:1 and old movies that are 1.37:1 and old TV that is 1.33:1.

Then there is IMAX at 1.89:1 or 1.77:1, but the intent there is it should be as wide as scope only taller. True there are not a lot of these movies maybe a couple a year released this way, but they normally are considered blockbusters. Many with scope screens feel it is ok to crop these down by chopping the top and bottom off. I agree with @rossandwendy on this one and feel it is just as wrong to crop these “Scope Safe” movies as any other movie. Others with scope screens obviously disagree.

Now you mentioned a high amount of your viewing will be sports. There is no convention on how immersive scope should be relative to sports. If you went to the super bowl or the NBA finals the seats you would want would be close to the sidelines and very immersive. There is a great difference in what is TV. I can easily watch NBA at an immersion level equal to IMAX, Wheel of Fortune would make me ill that large.

You will end up setting many different presets and the AR of the perfect screen would be the widest width x tallest height. In my case that came back to 16:9 but sized for IMAX and I use much of that screen height for things other than IMAX.
:)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Zooming 16:9 image on 2:35:1 screen

Why would you not use lens memory to zoom out a 16:9 image all the way to fill a 2:35:1 screen?
 

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Do you mean zooming out a 16x9 image to have the same width as your 2.35:1 screen and cut off the top and bottom? The obvious reason is you cut off the top and bottom of an image, which is even more intrusive then cutting the sides off a cinimascope image. Another reason is often shows I watch in 16x9 are sports or TV shows that may not be from the best source (maybe YTTV or ESPN+) and having them at 150" from 11' viewing distance doesn't help a poor source. Of course I watch other 16x9 content that does look pretty good like Jack Ryan which is 4K UHD or the Game of Thrones Blu-Rays.


Instead I use lens memory to zoom 16x9 content to the same height as my 2.35:1 screen. I believe that gives me a 114" image on my 142" scope screen.
 
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Why would you not use lens memory to zoom out a 16:9 image all the way to fill a 2:35:1 screen?
Because portions of the 16:9 image will then be projected onto your wall.



Although JVC projectors have a masking feature that can blank out those parts of the image and turn them into letterbox bars you won't notice anymore, you may lose critical picture info in content that was actually composed for 16:9. For example, if you watch sports, the score and stats overlays are usually positioned at the top or bottom of the screen and will be cropped out.
 

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