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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ken,


On your website you have good instructions for rolling on Screen Goo. I had the chance to purchase a Campell Hausfield HVLP Easy Sprayer last week for another project and now I feel that this thing is begging to spray some Goo on a parkland plastic screen.


Question is what specific instructions do you have for spraying your screen go?


How does the top coat have to be thinned? Recommend Floetrol? Just add water?


Is 500ml enough with a spray for a 84" x 45" screen?


I've only used this sprayer 3 times now so I am still a bit of a rookie.


All the best,

Ricardo


p.s. posted these questions because for sure they will be useful to others and can be used for future reference
 

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I myself have never actually handled a HVLP spay system. I have no idea how it works in comparison to a standard air compressor/cup-gun set up.


The paint has to be laid down with a slight textured surface.. ie., 'micro-stippled'. This gives the best hotspotting control. For this effort, you should DEFINITELY use the high gain mixes.


Gain curves are half screen material output characteristics..and half textural (surface) in nature. The truth is they are both of these things. So, the reflective qualities of the material, combined with the physical structure of the surface.


with a spray system...this is relatively easy to do.


We get the product to you..and you spray it in a controlled fashion. That's about all there is to it!


The advantage you have with the Goo, is that you get the chance to'familiarize' yourself with the basic handling characteristics of the mixtures when you spray the primer (undercoat) and then do the topcoat..employing that experience.


Let me put it to you this way: if the product allows you to create the screen you need for your SPECIFIC application..and to do it at a lower cost than anything else, by far..and you make a mistake,and have to buy the product TWICE.....where's the harm?


The absolute worst case (lying face down in ditch kind of paranoid thinking) you are STILL WAY...WAY ahead of the game!!! And this is the WORST that could happen.


The facts of the matter are,that the product is easy to spray..and sprays better than any other paint around...period. It just requires that you become familiar with it's particular handling characteristics.

______________


[Ramble]


How to make the best screen????


What you need to do, is get your hands on the best 'reflective energy' (sum total of returned light) material possible..and then, micro-stipple the surface characteristics to get hot-spotting control. So, you end up with a 'high energy-light return' surface..with a final gain number of..about 1.1-1.3 (grey) or so. Gain is NOT JUST ALL NUMBERS. Get that crap out of your head. It's nice an all to have 'numbers' for screens, but the reality is that it means virtually nothing (and tells nothing) about the quality of the screen.


That's a fact. Get used to it.


Everyone who has tried the product notices that our screens tend to be BRIGHTER. Could it be due to the fact that the actual amount of returned energy is HIGHER? Could it be due to the fact that in the single 1 liter container of topcoat..there is enough material to surface about 75-100 sq ft, or much MORE... (if done in the same manner) compared to the 'average commercial' screen?


Where's the bargain now? Who's screen would end up being the best....now?


[/Ramble]
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
DIY Guy,


Thanks for the link.


In a nutshell from that long thread:
  • floetron is emphatically NOT recommended (causes mixtures issues, yellows color)
  • use plain water to thin mixture
  • High Gain max requires precise control of the lay of the paint (its surface texture) Put High Gain mix on wet and it is super hot, mist it on from farther away to get into the lower range of the gain. This offers the most flexibility but requires some skill in the spraying.
  • Low Gain Mix is more easily sprayed (by a novice) since you can lay it on wet & not get into trouble of super high gains and hotspotting.



Ricardo
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ken,


You posted right when I was writing my short summary.


My HVLP (high volume low pressure) gun is works just like my airbrush that I used to paint my car models in high school. It's just a lower pressure system. I have painted some woodwork to date and have noticed that I don't get the same level of atomization of the paint that I am used to with an airbrush. But that is because I think I am not thinning the paint enough and because it is not a high pressure system. Perhaps the low pressure aspect of it prevents getting such a fine mist. They give you a viscosity stick and I have never gotten the paint thin enough so that it flows off the stick like it is supposed to. I guess I was gun shy about adding so much water.


Anyway, now that I own this thing I see no reason why I couldn't experiment a bit with it with some leftover paint that I have a some cardboard to spray on. I just have to familiarize myself with the amount of thinning required to get a good mist. Or I could just go with the low gain mix and put it on wet. Hmmm.....


I'm looking to a gray screen with 1.3-1.5 gain or so.


All the best,

Ricardo
 

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Ricardo,


I was doing a little research on HVLP sprayers and found out that you need at least a 3-stage turbine system to properly atomize the higher viscosity finishes.
 

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I am using a HVLP system at the moment in my glass beaded paint experiments.

HVLP is completely different to a normal high pressure system. Due to the higher transfer efficiency (paint output) the handling of the gun requires a little getting used to as it is much more efficient in laying paint on a surface.The atomised particles are larger and the gun needs to be placed closer to the surface and movement of the gun needs to be adjusted accordingly.

In the end after a bit of practice, you will find that you will never go back to high pressure systems again. DIY Guy is correct on the high viscosity atomisation, but I have found that even a single stage turbine can produce great results if the material is thinned carefully. Remember that HVLP does not produce as fine a mist as high pressure, that's the nature of the beast.

However, there is nothing stopping you pulling the gun a bit further back from the surface to get a more diffuse paint application.
 

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When you say "single stage turbine", what exactly do you mean? I have a single stage compressor, are we saying the same thing? Also, if we are saying the same thing, since HVLP uses low pressure, why is the output of the compressor important? Thanks


jeff
 

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A turbine and compressor are two different things. The turbine is a high powered air blower while a compressor is piston powered forcing air into a tank or resevoir. A single stage compressor has a single piston pumping air I believe. If you are using a HVLP ''conversion gun'' that runs on a standard compressed air supply, the output of the compressor needs to have a large volume output for these type of guns( specified as CFM ).Most of these guns require 12-22 CFM at 50 P.S.I. to operate correctly. The high pressure is converted to low pressure within the gun to simulate HVLP turbine systems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ziggyr,


I've noticed the same thing, the larger size of the particles and the requirement to get much closer. At frist I was scared to get so close then once I adjusted to the technique required things seem to work out great. The wainscoting I painted with my simple $160 HVLP gun with single stage turbine turned out terrific. My gun is extremely simple to clean and am happy with my purchase.


I may just give some of KBK high gain goo a chance. I think I can make a real eye popping gray screen with the stuff. And if it ends up too bright for nightime viewing then that is what an ND filter is for. I think I need to just experiment with thinning paint to get a feel for what will work best.


All the best,

Ricardo
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Alright Ken,


I just bit the bullet and ordered some of your goo.


Digital Grey Light Primer

Digital Grey High Gain Mix


I probably wont' get around to spraying the screen for another 3-4weeks. I will be painting on blackout cloth streched over a wood frame I will make.


I'll be sure to let everyone know about my results when complete. This will be for my recently ordered Panny AE100. This will cost me about half of Dalite permwall screen with their HCCV material.


All the best,

Ricardo
 
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