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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ken, as you are probably aware of my failed attempts at spraying glass beads in paint form, I thought I might ask for your comments on the use of different spray systems .

I used a crappy domestic HVLP system for all the attempts in the past and I am suspicious that this may have been a contributing factor to poor surface results . I did try a high pressure gun at one time , but discovered later on that the gun and compressor were mismatched and that at the time my mix of beads to matt clear was insuficient in the ratio of beads to paint resulting in a low ''bead count''. I had first thought that the low bead output was due to the nature of high velocity of the paint particles with high pressure guns causing the beads to bounce off the surface. I am not so sure now that this was the case at all as I recently borrowed a friend's conventional spray system to spray the last of my test mix and managed to get similar results to previous attempts at only two coats.

After reading your recent posts on spraying Goo, I am curious to hear your thoughts on using high pressure guns for the glass bead idea. Do you think that using around 70 psi and applying multiple misted coats may produce an even surface without blotches or striping ?

I have learnt so far that multiple light coats can produce what seems to be the start of a totally even application of beads. There is however a critical point of no return where too many beads can be applied , leaving dark patches where sections have stacked beads. My last spray effort with HVLP had this problem but I can only blame myself for this as I applied two uneven coats one immediately after the other . I guess I gave up there and then more in frustration of my impatient spraying style than anything else.

Would welcome your thoughts as well as other forum members on the use of different pressures and spraying distances and how this may effect surface results and application.

I am willing to go the high pressure route using a high quality cup gun and continue the experimentation if there is any chance of achieving better results.


Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
No one interested in commenting ?..............looks like I'm on my own .
 

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ziggy,

i suppose, there are not much people in the world, who are spraying glass beads on projection screens with HVLP guns! So there is not much experience of that. I'm still interested how this could work with or without a spray gun. As you may know i was succesfull with my overkill technique doin' small sheets. They had perfect uniformity, but i wasn't brave enough to apply these damned beads on my large screen. Maybe i will try this with a second sceen for the open-air-garden cinema. I also hoped, you could tell better results. It's still remains a technical challenge for homeworkers!


cya

xblocker
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Xblocker, this is a frustrating saga , believe me!. I have come so close with the glass beaded paint idea and at the point where the problem seems to be either the spray equipment or the sprayer( me!).

I may need the assistance of a professional automotive spray painter who knows what he is doing. These guys spray all sorts of weird paints of varoius thickness and high solids composition.

If I somehow knew how to spray the beads dry on to wet paint there could be a possibility of success, who knows?


Cheers
 

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Maybe we should stick these beads each after the other, side by side, onto the screen. Doing that we have much time to think about the best method..., but it's little bit sssllloooowwww!


9.999.998.....9.999.999.....

xblocker
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That has been suggested by a friend of mine while he was laughing hysterically..........I just said calmly.....''this is not a laughing matter, you ***!!##^~`##**''.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Xblocker, remember the article posted some time ago regarding the making of a giant glass beaded screen in France back in the 1930's ?

They applied the beads using ''a special compressed air gun'' on to a white surface coated with varnish. They were obviously spraying the beads dry directly out of this gun. So, I guess it can be done, but what sort of gun can do this?. Perhaps something can be made or an existing gun modified ?

There would be no need for high pressure, just enough air to ''blow'' the beads on to the wet surface.

Some sort of simple gravity feed mechanism with a gentle air supply comes to mind at the moment.
 

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ziggy, sticking them one by one would bring us into Guinness Book!

Seriously, i'm near to believe they (1930) shot the beads dry, 'cause then it's unpossible to get more than one layer. The non-sticking beads fall down, so you can do as many 'coatings' you want, the gaps should be filled and uniformity should be reached. In theory...!


xblocker
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
xblocker, yes, this could be the answer.

I am currently researching what type of gun can do this and at the moment it looks like a TEXTURE HOPPER GUN may be the way to go. I will have to look at one to see how these guns push out the material. They operate with a large gravity feed container on top of the gun and have nozzle sizes ranging from 3.5 mm to 8.0 mm. A standard air compressor is used and some guns come with air control regulation.

When I get one I will try one bead at a time (just kidding!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
KBK,.......you haven't replied.........what do you reckon about my GLASSGOO?
 

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Sorry, i've been off line for a while. I might go for a large tip size HVLP system, with a 'spattering' type of tip. the orifices tend to be large enough to allow this.


Also, the temp/humidity will wreak havok. The problem beingthat glass/polymer beads will have static attractant/repulsive problems, so, stacking is a natural side effect. the surface can only be done once, unles the beads are done dry, on a wet surface. Investigate in the direction of sand blasting systems, maybe. This might replicate the 'older screen' article's solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks Ken. Will need to look into this as a possibility for better results.
 
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